Question about Microsoft Windows 98 for PC

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How to get more restore point fron corrupted windows 98 registry. my friends move all directory to d: drive. how to bring back to C :

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  • CLEAR98 Jul 05, 2008

    posted by CLEAR98 on Jul 05, 2008

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Hey there

The first thing that you should aware of is you cannot move the system file that are currently being used by another program to any of the directory. If it is so then you wont be able to log on to ur computer. because it will give you a lot error of missing system files.

For restoring your system do the following:
1. Go to Start -> All Programs -> Accessories ->System Tools
and select System Restore
2. Go to next window, Choose the restore point that is available remembering ur system was exactly what you wanted for.
3. Select that restore point by reading the description.
4. Click next to restore.

Note: Your system will restart after choosing the restore point and clicking next. It takes some time to restore.
for creating the restore point, follow the same step specified above except the second one. you need to select create new restore point insted of choosing restore point to restore.
Type a restore name and click next to create.

Gimme ur acknowledge by rating me
thanx

-
Romy

Posted on Aug 04, 2008

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I'm getting this message every few minutes on a Vista system. Acrord32.exe-No Disk "there is no disk in the drive\Device\Harddisk4\DR4.


These instructions apply If you have "Adobe Acrobat Reader" installed, not if you have the paid for, full suite "Adobe Acrobat".

1. Completely uninstal "Adobe Acrobat Reader"
more details (troubleshooting):
https://forums.adobe.com/thread/755658
2. Reinstall (if you so choose) "Adobe Acrobat Reader"
http://get.adobe.com/reader/
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Feb 14, 2015 | Microsoft Windows Vista Business Edition...

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Missing plug-inn?i want to restore


Title:missing plug-inn?i want to restore

If you set a restore point then do as --
To set a System Restore Point...
  • Open the Start menu
  • Open the Programs menu
  • Open the Accessories menu
  • Open the System Tools menu
  • Finally, start System Restore
  • Pick the option for setting a System Restore Point and click on the Next button
  • Fill in a name for the restore point so you can find it and click on the Create button
  • Click on the Close button when done
Recovery---
In Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7, if booting all the way into normal mode causes problems, such as features that don't work, freezes, etc., it is possible to backdate Windows itself to an earlier state when it was working properly by restoring a restore point created automatically or manually by or in System Restore.
You should know that System Restore does not back up and restore non-system files or third-party software or any changes made by such software. It also does not involve restoring the data files on the computer. Only the essential files required to get Windows running are involved in the creation of its dated restore points that take the system files back to the date on which a particular restore point was created. Nor does System Restore clean up files left over by a botched software installation, which is a common cause of corrupted system files, and it can't be used to restore selectively files that have been accidentally erased. In other words, System Restore is a very handy tool that has saved my PCs on numerous occasions, but it is not a substitute for a full system backup, such as the creation of a disk image of the system, and should never be relied upon as such.

May 07, 2011 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

1 Answer

I want to restore my windows 98


Under normal circumstances, Windows is capable of detecting and recovering from registry errors automatically. If Windows is incapable of this, a previous copy of the registry can be restored manually. Windows makes and stores a backup of the registry when you start your computer successfully each day. By default, five previous copies or the registry are stored. To restore one of these previous copies:
  1. Start your computer, press and hold CTRL, and then choose Safe Mode Command Prompt Only from the Windows 98 Startup menu. If you are running Windows Me, start your computer with the startup disk.
  2. At the MS-DOS prompt, type cd\windows\command, and then press ENTER. Where windows is the name of the folder in which Windows is installed.

  3. At the C: prompt, type scanreg /restore, and then press ENTER.
  4. Select the previous registry you want to restore, and then press ENTER.NOTE: A properly working registry has the word "Started" next to the date.

  5. When you receive notification that you restored a properly working registry, press ENTER to restart your computer

Apr 23, 2010 | Microsoft Windows 98 for PC

1 Answer

Windows xp boots but the desktop will not come up


Hi,
Log in using SAFE MODE. While laptop boots, press F8 and it will prompt for which mode to login. Select 'SAFE MODE'. Once logged in try to restore the OS to a previous good restore point.
If you've a backup of the registry key, it will help better. Just restore the registry from the backup instead of going for an old restore point.
Please come back and rate my solution if this turns to be helpful for you or also if you need more clarification. Thnx

Apr 01, 2010 | Operating Systems

1 Answer

I get the STOP: C0000218 {Registry File Failure} The registry cannot load the hive (file):System RootSystem32ConfigSECURITY or its log or alternate. It is corrupt, absent, or not writable..On my windows xp...


This is one of the main reasons I prefer to do a clean installation from CD rather than simply doing a system restore. There's less chance for something to go wrong with a clean installation. Unfortunately, many computer manufacturers no longer provide a complete CD, but you still may be able to completely wipe your drive rather than using the restore option. The Stop: c0000218 error is typically associated with one of several things, depending on how far through the recovery process you made it before encountering the error.

The first possibility is simply corruption in the Windows Registry. A second option is a component of your system hardware is not compatible with Windows XP or your hard drive has some kind of issue. Since you are re-installing Windows XP using System Restore, it seems unlikely your system hardware is incompatible, although I won't rule out the possibility entirely. The third possibility, a damaged hard drive, is possible even if Windows appeared to run smoothly prior to your reinstallation. Before throwing in the towel, we'll take a closer look at each possibility
Assuming the Windows Registry is simply corrupt, the first thing to attempt is a recovery via the Automatic System Recovery for your particular installation. Since you are attempting to do a system restore, it's possible you already tried this and had it fail. If this is not the case, follow the detailed directions presented in Microsoft Knowledge Base article 307545.

If you attempted your system restore using the OEM provided restore partition or CD and received this error, make sure you don't have any hardware components connected which weren't part of the initial build of your computer. System restore disks look for specific hardware components. If the original components are missing it occasionally introduces errors in the restore process.
A third possibility is the hard drive is damaged in some way. Many disks have bad sectors and you won't know about them until you attempt to write over the sectors during a specific operation. If you can boot from your install CD, you will be presented with the option to Repair or Recover the Windows XP installation. Pressing R launches the Microsoft Recovery Console which then asks for the Administrator password. After entering the password, run chkdsk to check the drive for errors by typing chkdsk /r at the command line. If chkdsk finds errors, you may need to use chkdsk /f to repair the errors before proceeding.
Since you are attempting to revert your Windows installation back to baseline, the best option remains doing a completely fresh install because it will avoid any potential corruptions already existing in your current installation by installing a fresh copy of Windows instead of reusing existing core components that may now be corrupt.

Have this as a guide when you perform system restore in recovery console..http://www.myfixes.com/articles/system..

Hope this will help..

Feb 04, 2010 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

1 Answer

QUICKLAUNCH IN WINDOWS XP KEEPS DISAPPEARING. I CHECK IT (SELECT IT), WHEN A RESTART OCCURS, QUICKLAUNCH IS UNCHECKED AND HAS TO BE RECHECKED/RESELECTED.


Do you have the google toolbar installed? There are reports that this conflicts with the quicklaunch toolbar, and uninstalling google toolbar will correct the quick launch.
If not, it's likely that your registry has been corrupted somehow, perhaps by use of a registry cleaner?
In any case, this post describes the various registry fixes that are available for this error. If you are not comfortable working in the registry, please obtain the assistance of someone competent to do so. Make sure you set a restore point and back up your registry with Erunt before performing any registry edits, in case you need to restore your system. Mistakes in the registry can disable your computer.
An alternative might be to run sfc /scannow to check your system files and correct any corruption found. Here is an overview of it and Here is a guide that describes how to do so with an sp3 updated disc. Here is the MS article. I recommend you use this tool to begin with, since there are obvious signs of some registry corruption on your system.
Furthermore, if you have been using registry cleaners, see this article.

I hope this information allows you to resolve this issue. If you need further assistance, please post back with a comment to this thread.
If I've managed to answer your question or solve a problem, please take just a moment to rate this post....thanks!

Aug 28, 2009 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

1 Answer

Corrupted Registry in Win98SE + Cannot fix.


Try this. Been a long time since I used a command prompt but it should work. If you can get to the boot menu use a start up floppy.

Restoring a Backup

Reboot your computer, press F8 to enter Windows Boot options. Start your computer with Command Prompt ONLY.

To restore your most recent backup.
At the command prompt type --> scanreg /restore and hit enter.

To choose a backup to restore.

Go to the \Windows\Command directory.
Run SCANREG /restore
Select which one you want to restore.

May 21, 2009 | Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition for PC

2 Answers

What happens if we delete hidden directory system volume informat


Hidden directories most often serve to hide important operating system-related files and user preferences. This is mostly to protect the files. But malicious programs (malware, viruses, trojans) can also use this functionality to hide their presence.

The System Volume Information folder is a hidden system folder that the System Restore tool uses to store its information and restore points. System Volume Information (SVI) is the name of the data store where Windows XP and Windows Vista keeps its System Restore files and registration databases. System Restore not only saves copies of critical system files, it also performs automated registry hive backup.

There is one SVI folder per drive being monitored by System Restore. You can not view/access the SVI folder by default but there is a way to make them visible. You might need to gain access to this folder for troubleshooting purposes.

Basically, if you delete the System Volume Information folder, you will no longer have the files and data needed to restore your system to a previous state. For example, if Windows crashes or is stuck in a continuous boot cycle, you can use System Restore to restore your system to a previous "healthy" state. However, if there are no files or registry backups available, this tool is then no longer available to you. Also, if you ever decided to use System Restore, you would need to re-create the foler in the same path so that the system files can be stored there again.

Hopefully, you backup your system and keep good backups often...

Apr 13, 2009 | Microsoft Operating Systems

2 Answers

U need to restore the default settings in registry editor


the only thing I can offer is make a folder on the C:\ my oldxp files and move all your files into this and boot into windows cd from bois and go through the process off installing windows wizard and when you com to the option of format just leave alone then use the setup files directory will delete the windows folder contentents and alter My Documents folder and the Program Files folders and install windows next you will come to the activation seting skip this and get your motherboard drivers installed and your net installed then download Emule then search for cracking software on this then download them but have Avg inastalled as this will bring in virus's and use these cracks to have your windows genuine then make a backup of hdd with an imaging software and install service pack 2 then take another snap shot of hdd when all is well.

good luck

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Backup DHCP,AD of win 2000 .


How To Use the Backup Program to Back Up and Restore the System State in Windows 2000 var sectionFilter = "type != 'notice' && type != 'securedata' && type != 'querywords'"; var tocArrow = "/library/images/support/kbgraphics/public/en-us/downarrow.gif"; var depthLimit = 10; var depth3Limit = 10; var depth4Limit = 5; var depth5Limit = 3; var tocEntryMinimum = 1; .toc{display: none;} SUMMARY loadTOCNode(1, 'summary'); This article describes how you can optionally back up the system state in the Windows 2000 Backup program to back up and restore critical system data. When you choose to back up the system state on a domain controller, the following items are included: • Active Directory (NTDS) • The boot files • The COM+ class registration database • The registry • The system volume (SYSVOL)When you back up the system state on a non-domain controller, the following items are included: • The Boot file • The COM+ class registration database • The registryWhen you back up a member server or domain controller with Certificate Server installed, the following additional item is also included: • Certificate ServerWindows 2000 Backup can back up and restore Active Directory on Windows 2000 domain controllers. You can perform a backup operation while the domain controller is online. You can perform a restore operation only when the domain controller is booted into Directory Services Restore mode (by pressing the F8 key when the server is booting).

uparrow.gifBack to the top
How to Back Up the System State on a Domain Controller loadTOCNode(2, 'summary'); 1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Backup. 2. Click the Backup tab. 3. Click to select the System State check box. (All of the components to be backed up are listed in the right pane. You cannot individually select each item.)

NOTE: During the system state backup, you must select to back up the Winnt\Sysvol folder. You must also select this option during the restore operation to have a working sysvol after the recovery.The following information applies only to domain controllers. You can restore member servers the same way, but in normal mode.

If any of the following conditions are not met, the system state is not restored. Backup attempts to restore the system state, but does not succeed. • The drive letter on which the %SystemRoot% folder is located must be the same as when it was backed up. • The %SystemRoot% folder must be the same folder as when it was backed up. • If sysvol or other Active Directory databases were located on another volume, they must exist and have the same drive letters also. The size of the volume does not matter. uparrow.gifBack to the top
How to Restore the System State on a Domain Controller loadTOCNode(2, 'summary'); 1. To restore the system state on a domain controller, first start the computer in Directory Services Restore Mode. To do so, restart the computer and press the F8 key when you see the Boot menu. 2. Choose Directory Services Restore Mode. 3. Choose the Windows 2000 installation you are going to recover, and then press ENTER. 4. At the logon prompt, supply the Directory Services Restore mode credentials you supplied during the Dcpromo.exe process. 5. Click OK to acknowledge that you are using Safe mode. 6. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Backup. 7. Click the Restore tab. 8. Click the appropriate backup media and the system state to restore.

NOTE: During the restore operation, the Winnt\Sysvol folder must also be selected to be restored to have a working sysvol after the recovery process. Be sure that the advanced option to restore "junction points and data" is also selected prior to the restore. This ensures that sysvol junction points are re-created. 9. In the Restore Files to box, click Original Location.

NOTE: When you choose to restore a file to an alternative location or to a single file, not all system state data is restored. These options are used mostly for boot files or registry keys. 10. Click Start Restore. 11. After the restore process is finished, restart the computer.

Dec 02, 2007 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

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