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HP 7920 motherboard

Color coded wires on 6 wire micro-atx do what?

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Please list the name & model number of the motherboard. Did you receive a manual for this board. It sound like you are asking where to plug in the case's LED's to the motherboard.
You can find the model number printed on the board or inbetween the PCI slots.

Mike

Posted on Jul 09, 2008

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I have an Hp m260n. I just need to find out what type of case it has (ATX or uATX).


http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?lc=en&cc=us&docname=c00026876

Motherboard: ASUS P4SD Motherboard Specifications

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c00022505&lc=en&cc=us&dlc=en#c00022505_doc

Board Form Factor: uATX

uATX stands for Micro-ATX,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MicroATX

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_form_factor

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_form_factor#Tabular_information

HOWEVER, the Power Supply is an ATX form factor,

http://www.911forpcs.com/hp-media-center-power-supply.html

,of a sort.

Form Factor related directly to desktop computer Motherboards.
Now has 'evolved' to relate to the computer case, and Power Supply.

When referring to a Power Supply, and the ATX form factor; you are not only referring to the size, and shape of the Power Supply's case; but also the type of power cables used, and the technology used within.

Size and shape of an ATX power supply is approximately;

6 Inches Wide, 5.5 Inches Long, and 3.5 Inches in Height.
(152.39mm Wide, 139.69mm Long, and 88.89mm in Height)

Power cables included with Power Supply's nowadays, will include all the power cables you'll need, with probably some left over.

HOWEVER, looking at the 'ATX' form factor designated for your computer, to wit from the ad above, it does NOT fit the above size, and shape.

More like 6 Inches Wide, 4 Inches Long, and 3.5 Inches in Height.
Looks like they just crammed everything into one small box.

Remove motherboard, and all internal hardware, into a new computer case?
No prob!

Most Mid-Tower to Full Tower size computer cases, will have a Support Plate that accommodates a Micro-ATX form factor motherboard, OR an ATX form factor motherboard.

Just look at the Support Plate mounting holes.
Ones for a Micro-ATX (uATX) motherboard, will have uATX next to them, or MATX, or mATX.

Ones for an ATX motherboard, will have ATX next to them.

However check the computer case manufacturer info to be sure.

[ The motherboard mounts to a Support Plate.
The Support Plate can be an integral part of the metal frame, of the computer case; or a separate metal plate that attaches to the computer case metal frame ]

Not what you had in mind Joel? Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Feb 17, 2013 | HP Media Center PC M260n (DF200A#ABA) PC...

1 Answer

My dell dccy will not power on. It was working fine and was powered off but will not power back on. I have checked the power cord. I have opened the case and reseated all connectors. Pushing the power on...


Yes, it's called bypassing the Power On switch. Has nothing to do with the switch itself, or it's wires.

You use a jumper wire on the 20 or 24-pin ATX main power cable's connector.
Touch the jumper wire from the Green wire (Soft Power On) to ANY Black wire. (Ground)
(Soft Power On is abbreviated as PS_ON)

If the Power Supply comes on, the problem is the Power On switch.
If the Power Supply does Not come on, the problem is the Power Supply.

1) 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

2) 24-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

Look at the photos of the ATX main power cable plugged into the motherboard.
Where the wires go down into the connector is the Back of the connector.

This is where the jumper wire goes down into.

The jumper wire goes down into the socket hole, in the Back of the connector, RIGHT NEXT to the wire IN the socket hole.
The jumper wire has to go pretty far down in the socket hole.

[ATX power cable plugged into the motherboard, Power Supply plugged into power ]

At the end of every wire in the ATX main power cable's connector, is a metal terminal.

A Female Molex Crimp Terminal connector,

http://www.alibaba.com/product-gs/336134982/molex_female_crimp_terminal_connector/showimage.html

[You can click on the Zoom In icon { + } at the top to enlarge the view]

The jumper wire Must touch that metal terminal.
The jumper wire is made from a straightened out paper clip, bent into a U shape.
The middle of the U is wrapped a few times with Black plastic electrical tape.
This where your fingers hold onto the jumper wire.

(One wrap of Black plastic electrical tape is good for 600 Volts DC)

One 'leg' of the U shaped jumper wire goes down into the socket hole with a Green wire.
The other 'leg' of the U shaped jumper wire goes down into ANY socket hole with a Black wire.
(ALL Black wires are Ground wires)

The contact period made is no longer than 2 seconds.

The Voltage is 5 Volts DC.
Two flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC.

This is one generic ATX power on switch that I have found fits many computers,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

NOTE*

WATCH IT when buying an aftermarket Power Supply for your computer, if it needs one.
For a time period Dell was strictly a Proprietary computer manufacturer.
Dell wanted THEIR parts used in THEIR computers only.

They had the motherboard manufacturer switch the pins around in the ATX main power cable connector, on the motherboard.
They also had the Power Supply manufacturer switch the power cables around in the Power Supply.

This means if you plug an ATX main power cable, from an aftermarket Power Supply, into one of these proprietary Dell motherboards, you WILL fry out the motherboard!

Can also fry out the Processor, Ram Memory, and Harddrive. (Plus a graphics card if you have one installed)

CHECK the color code of the aftermarket Power Supply's ATX main power cable, to the color code of the Dell power supply.

See that the color code of the wires matches the socket holes in the connector.

Have further questions regarding this, post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Nov 29, 2010 | Dell Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I am looking at a Dell Dimension 4550 PC for a friend and it won't boot up...i push the power button on and there is an almost orange/greenish light on the power button... no beeps no diagnostic lights are...


Bad Power Supply. Weak voltage power rail.

[There are three main voltages produced by the Dimension 4550's Power Supply.
1) 3.3 Volts
2) 5 Volts
3) 12 Volts ]

The Power On button LED functions as a diagnostic light also.

Dell Support > Dimension 4550 > Service Manual,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim4550/

Left-click on Solving Problems, then click on Power Problems

The Power Supply is just an ATX form factor version. The common Power Supply form factor used in MANY desktop computers.
(ATX form factor for a Power Supply refers to the size, and shape of the Power Supply's case.
Approximately 6 inches Wide, 5.5 inches Long, and 3-1/2 inches Tall)

HOWEVER, (Not shouting), there is an area of concern, should you try a Power Supply you may have available for a test, or purchase one.

It involves the wiring of the 20-pin ATX main power cable. More specifically the power cable's connector.

To explain view the standard wiring, set for a 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Looking at the photo to the far right, observe the color code of the wires, going down into the socket holes of the connector.

Look at the Lock tab on the side of the connector. This will help you orient the color code of the wires, and their placement in the socket holes, to the chart below the photos.

The connector on the end of the 20-pin ATX main power cable, is a Male connector.
Where the wires go into the connector, is the Back of the connector.
In the middle photo you can see the Front of the connector.

The wires going down into the ATX main power cable's connector, end in a female metal terminal.
The connector on the motherboard, (Shown in the photo to the Left), has Pins.
The metal female terminals go over the Pins.

The pins are numbered. The color code of the wires match up to the pins.
This is shown in the chart.

Now look at Dell Support > Dimension 4550 > Technical Overview > DC Power Connectors >
DC Power Connector P1

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim4550/techov.htm#1101897

The illustration may not be accurate. You'll have to compare since you have the computer, and Power Supply in front of you.

For a time period Dell was a Proprietary manufacturer.
Meaning they wanted THEIR parts used on THEIR computers, and ONLY THEIR parts.
They had the motherboard manufacturers make motherboards according to their specs.

One of the specifications was that the pins would be CHANGED around, in the motherboard connector for the ATX main power cable.

They also had Power Supply manufacturers make the ATX power cable to their specifications.

This means if a user bought an aftermarket Power Supply, the color code of the wires in the ATX main power cable would Not match.

Many users did buy an aftermarket Power Supply, and installed it.
Burnt motherboards, fried Processors, and graphics cards, resulted.

Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
Red wires are 5 Volts
Yellow wires are 12 Volts.
Black wires are Ground wires.

Guess what happens when you plug a 12 Volt wire into where a 3.3 Volt, or 5 Volt, or Ground wire is supposed to Be?
POOF!

My suggestion would be to look for a Power Supply that is an ATX form factor, is KNOWN to be good, and is compatible, for a test unit.
You, or someone you know may have upgraded to a better computer, and you may be able to borrow the Power Supply for a test unit.

Compatible:
Has the Correct power cables.
1) 20-pin ATX main power cable, OR a 20/24-pin ATX main power cable.
(20-pin connector that has an additional connector with 4 pins. Just use the 20-pin)

2) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable. (Also referred to as P4 MB, and P4 ATX 12V)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

(Power for the Processor)

3) Enough standard 4-pin Peripheral power cables.
(Misnomered as Molex)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

(Power for the IDE Harddrive, and Optical drive/s)

Also:
You can change the power wires around in the ATX main power cable's connector.
Change them around, in an aftermarket Power Supply's ATX main power cable's connector.

Want to know how post in a Comment.

Oct 09, 2010 | Dell Dimension 4550 PC Desktop

2 Answers

Need to know which style of m b I have is it an atx


The difference between ATX and MicroATX is the size. An ATX board will usually have 6-7 slots to add cards like video, network or sound cards. An ATX board will also usually not have a video port on the board. A MicroATX board will usually have only 3-4 slots to add cards into it, at least one of which being dedicated to AGP or PCI Express Video cards.
To answer your question: That computer uses a MicroATX board. A Micro ATX board will most likely work in any PC Case whereas an ATX board requires an ATX size case (Mid or Full size Tower).

Jun 06, 2010 | eMachines T3508 PC Desktop

1 Answer

I would like to move it in to a bigger case


When looking at the specifications of the HP Compaq DC7700 SFF Desktop PC, all they state is the motherboard form factor is, 'Custom'.

Same thing for the DC7700 USDT Desktop PC.
Both of these desktop computers are of the 'Pizza Box' design.
(Flat rectangular box)

The DC7700 CMT model is a tower model, and the motherboard form factor for it is uATX.
uATX can also mean Micro-ATX.

The form factor of a Micro-ATX motherboard is 244mm by 244mm, or also said as 9.6 inches by 9.6 inches.
(9.6 inches is approximately 9 and 9/16ths inches)

To regress for a moment, and explain the term Form Factor.
This term is supposed to apply only to motherboards, but has gone on to apply to computer cases, and power supply's.

Form factor means the dimensions of the motherboard, and also where the I/O area is located.

[I/O = Input/Output
Area for the Input/Output devices that are attached to the computer.
Examples: Mouse, Keyboard and Monitor]

Whether the motherboard is installed onto the Left side of the computer case, and the I/O area is on the Left side also (ATX , Micro-ATX, and uATX form factor),
or
whether the motherboard is installed on the Right side of the computer case, and the I/O area is on the Right side also. (BTX)

Dimension sizes:
ATX is 305mm x 244mm. (12 inches by 9.6 inches)
Micro-ATX is 244mm x 244mm (9.6 inches by 9.6 inches)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_form_factor

Above the link is the Maximum size for the Micro-ATX form factor.
It can also be the Minimum size of 171.45mm x 171.45mm

(Or 6.75 inches by 6.75 inches.
6.75 inches = 6 and 3/4 inches)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MicroATX

Point of all this?
The motherboard form factor inside a DC7700 SFF is probably a uATX form factor, and is 6.75 inches by 6.75 inches.
Or some variation thereof.
It's a custom size.


This means good luck in finding a computer case you can buy off of the shelf, and is large enough to install an ATX power supply.

You can get a custom one made, and you're probably looking at $150 to $200.

Or, you can modify one of these computer cases VERY easily,

1) http://www.directron.com/cs888uvbl.html

The above is an Acyrlic plastic computer case. It's approximately 1/4 inch thick for the case walls, bottom, and top.

VERY sturdy.

It has metal Standoff's that are set up for an ATX motherboard.

It should have holes in the case where a Micro-ATX motherboard can be mounted, by unscrewing the Standoffs, and screwing them into the Micro-ATX holes.

[A Standoff is a piece of metal that is hex shaped, and has a threaded hole in one end, and a threaded end on the other side ]

If there isn't the proper holes for mounting your motherboard, you make the holes.
The case is plastic.

Uses an ATX power supply.
The cost of the case is $50

Mar 08, 2010 | HP RT810UTABA - HP dc7700 small form...

1 Answer

Ok! I have an ak32 shuttle mother board I'm wanting to upgrade. Over the years I've added newer graffics, audio, extra usb ports,and earthnet card. I built the pc in 2002. I had a cooling fan recently go...


the case isnt amd athlon 2100 xp, thats the processor, the case is either a atx or micro atx case, so refer back to the case and find out if it is a atx case or a micro atx case, then find a micro atx or atx motherboard so you dont have to replace all of your components

Jan 05, 2010 | Computers & Internet

4 Answers

Conections


Hi peju90,

If you've gutted out the old dell computer, then your only talking about a empty case. Put all the right chips and cpu's that the Asus board requires, and you should have no problem with the CD rom or any other hardware. Except if you try and put the hard disk from the dell, it will not have the same configurations, and probably be a bit crazy. But, reformat the drive to it's new board, and your home free.

The power connections will be the same as it was on the old Presario, if you have the old power supply then nothing changes on that. You'll need to hook up the front connectors for USB and Hard drive lights, reset etc, but that would be the ugliest senario. Meaning the csse fit a special connector that the board doesn't carry. In that case you to option, either cut the special connectors and replace them with the ones from the old Presario case, or don't connect them, all but the power, you're gonna need that hooked up, one way or the other.

But, that's as tough as it gets my friend. A case is a case is a case.

Good Luck

Mark

Oct 17, 2009 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Psu


The big thing you have to check on is wattage if they have the same output power and the mounting holes matchup i don't see why not. Most pc components are made by 3rd party vendors and then the companies name gets slapped on it. So double check

Mar 25, 2009 | HP Pavilion a705w PC Desktop

1 Answer

Hp m7580n mobo asus a8m2n-la was hit by lighting at ethernet input


Depends on what CPU you have stuck in it. Any micro atx AM2 mb will work as long as you know what power rating the cpu is 65w,85w95w. With HP and the rest of the crappy inti-graded mb using companies they like to use there own board connector which will not work with an after market. All you need is an old chasis tower pull the single pins off the wires and place them on the HP chasis wires getting rid of the 6 in 1 connector pin they use. After that you can use any after market like mother board in that tower.

Nov 21, 2007 | HP (D7580-60003) Motherboard

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