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I have jbl eon15 g2 which recently started to crackle when adjusting the levels. Recently that noise stopped, but when I raised it to high level (not out ordinary for the last 7 years) the sound cut out! I immediately pulled the cord from input 3 and plugged into input 2. It worked for a few seconds, then did it again. I pulled it from 2, put it back in 3 and so the cycle repeated it self. My guess is that it made no difference which one it went into, rather whatever heated up, seemed to have reset itself. I have some knowledge of electronics and can to some testing and soldering. Any ideas of what causes this?

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Open up the unit and clean the gain/volume control using an electronic swithc cleaner spray. Make sure that the cleaner contains a lubricant as well. That should resolve the problem. If not, update this with any changes in behavior.

Dan

Posted on Jul 03, 2008

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Its shorting out on you i did more research on this inside there is a chipboard now there is a fault inside and you need to take it in for test so they can find exactly whats shorting it out

Posted on Jul 03, 2008

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1 Answer

My PIONEER STEREO RECIVER MODEL SX-650 has very recently started making this weird crackling noise and ive tryed it on all kinds of differnt speakers so there not blown. Then i took it apart and cleaned it...


if the unit is under warranty just bring it back to the store or in the authorized service center. because there is no serviceable parts inside the unit esp on that kind of problem... ty

Jun 23, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

To reduce background noise from an audio mixer


when you say background noise I assume you mean the inherant noise that electronics produce. the the first thing to do is to make sure that all you input connections are shielded type, you don't need to spend money on gold plated connections, but do buy cables that are made with stranded wire and of decent size, bigger (fatter) is better when it comes to minimizing high frequency losses. Next, calibrate your inputs one at a time with a 1000hz signal that is 0db inn level. You can find this signal online through a search. you can also buy small plug in devices that produce this signal at 0 db (that is Zero Decibles) this is a common reference for "consumer" grade mixers, If you can't or don't want to spend any money on this you can use a signal from any tone generator, and some mixers have them built it. If you don't have any of the former, here is what you can do. turn all you mixer controls to 0 (zero) detent. in other words, flat, no treble, no bass, no midrange. on your inputs there should be input level knobs, these woule be set to thier lowest positionn if using a line input signal. if a microphone that level would be different, but wait on that for a bit. now have all you input knobs (or sliders) at minimum level. Now turn on your amplifer (if your using one) or what ever you monitor the output with. Headphones is a good choice as you can hear everything.
You should hear nothing. (nothing is supposed to in the inputs yet) if you hear noise take note of what it sounds like. turn the sound output level out (if headphones, turn up to a high level) and listen again. is the noise white (hiss) or hum (low freqency) if you have no noise, you have a good mixer and that is what it should be.
No plug in your first input, this is your choice but I would suggest you plug in microphone, now turn it up to the point where you can hear your own voice, you should hear just that, and maybe anything in the backgroud (furnace, tv, etc_) the quieter your environment, the better you can adjust this. Remember you will now need to turn up the input level. If you have meters you should be able to adjust the input to register in the green without turning red, a litlle yellow once in awhle is ok.
If this is quiet and clean you are ready to move on. turn that mic down to zero, but leave the input where you set it.
now plug in a line level source (your tape player,/cd player/ but don't use your computer as a source (yet). without anything playing on your machines you should hear very little noise in your headphones, if you hear a lot of noise you have bad cables.
Now play something through the tape/cd player, what ever and turn up the slider (not the input) this should give you a level,again in the green, with a little yellow, NO RED
once finished with this turn it back down and go to the next input. this time plug in your computer which most likely is coming from the green jack on the back (or front) of your PC/Mac or whatever. computers are very noisy machines, and just being close to one is sometimes enough to cause noise in a high gain system. anyway, plug in your computer and listen, you should hear some noise and I'd be surprized if this wasn't the source of your problem. make sure your volume level on the output of your pc is set to maximum, this will give you an advantage when recording. now turn up the slider on this input and listen for the noise level. good cables are important here and also the price of your computer may be reflected here as well since more expensive machines are better filtered and therefor produce less noise.
play a sound file (windows audio samples are noiseless and clearn) so use them if you can find thiem, look in your music folder for the sample files
You may hear some noise but your mixer is now set up at optimum and should give you nice sound if it is a quality mixer, good luck, Keith

Mar 24, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Hi. I have just connected my Bose Acoustimass 6 series III speakers. When I run a MCACC test, the display shows 'noisy' and there is no error message. If I run it again it stops and shows just noisy after...


Either your ambient noise level is too high for the test, or you need to increase the volume for the test tones.

For any such audio calibration testing your ambient noise level should be as quiet as possible, preferably below the measurable level of an SPL meter...usually 50dB for most models.

Dec 12, 2010 | Pioneer VSX-818V-K Receiver

1 Answer

On my Pioneer vsx-55txi, the protection circuit cuts in whenever I raise the volume to a reasonable level. If I sit 10 feet or more, the volume is too low. I don't like my music or movies loud, but this...


The protection circuit is enabling because the output transistors are 1. drawing too much current causing them to heat-up 2. the transistors are going out 3. the threshold level for the quiesce state is set too high and may need to be adjusted internally. Try to cool down the Unit and see if it occurs again.

Nov 28, 2010 | Pioneer VSX-55TXi 6.1 Channels Receiver

1 Answer

Hissing


Sounds like you're connected to a cable, satellite, or DVR box ("set top box"). Many times these units have their own volume controls.

Try reducing the volume of the set top box to 80% or below, preferrably somewhere between 50% and 70%. When the volume is set too high, the background noise will be amplified as well, which then gets amplified by your receiver and becomes audible.

You will need to adjust the volume level of your receiver to compensate for the lower input level, and keep in mind that some channels may have more noise than others. It'll be a balance between having all your input sources are relatively-similar input levels (so you don't have to adjust the volume a lot when switching between sources) and how much noise you can hear or ignore.

Apr 06, 2008 | Denon AVR-2801 Receiver

1 Answer

Sony STR-DE475 - Sound levels dropping


When did this start? Did it ever work right?

How's the sound from your TV speakers by itself and from DVD? The same? Problem's in the TV.

If it's just the receiver doing it from both sources that's where we start.

Check the settings for dynamic range (ratio of loud sounds to soft sounds) in both your receiver and your cable TV tuner. Many devices have a setting sometimes called "MidNight Mode" to be used in the event you're listening while someone else might be sleeping or otherwise would be disturbed by the TV volume.

The assumption is that you will turn the TV down but that normally means you would lose the quiet programming in the background nosie of your home. Through the magic of dynamic compression the quiter sounds are raised to audibility while loud things like explosions and fanfares will be limited in volume. Depending on the design and whatever the broadcaster is doing to the sound themselves this could be anywhere from pleasingly effective to aggravatingly inconsistent with odd variations in the levels.

Hope this helps.

Dec 17, 2007 | Sony STR-DE475 Receiver

2 Answers

Onkyo Amp


Set your input to the amp at mono.Then check levels again.If it is still low you have a prob w/amp circuitry

Oct 16, 2007 | Onkyo TX-SR604 Receiver

1 Answer

JVC RX558 VBK, Crackling noise from speakers


A quick quess of mine is the following:

The OVERLOAD indicator lights up when the receiver is maxing out on the current it is sending to the speakers. My guess is there is possibly something wrong with the receiver itself, especially since the B speakers won't play. Either that, or something is broken in your speakers or you are using a set of speakers that have too low an impedance rating for your receiver.

Apr 23, 2007 | JVC RX-558V

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