Question about Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium with Service Pack 1: Windows

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How do you "run" applications from the DOS window in Vista?

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  • Andrew Cerny
    Andrew Cerny May 11, 2010

    if its a native app just type in the name if its something you installed yourself then you have to type the path

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  • 31 Answers

Sorry miss posted that
if its a native app just type in the name if its something you installed yourself then you have to type the path

Posted on Jul 02, 2008

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How to Run Turbo Pascal Full Screen mode on Windows 7


Now that's a program I've not worked with in a while ;-) I haven't used it since my early high school days in the 1990s. Turbo is a really old application that has been around for ages- unfortunately, being as such, it is only capable of developing 16-bit DOS applications, which has, for better or worse, gone the way of the dinosaur. In the x64-bit versions of Windows Vista and 7, all 16-bit native support has actually gone out the window in favor of 32-bit and 64-bit application development. This is why DosBox was invented- it is a true 16-bit DOS environment (much like command.com and CMD.exe used to be) that is capable of running all the older DOS programs that are no longer compatible with Windows.
When you run Turbo from the DOSbox program, press ALT-ENTER and it will fullscreen whatever you're working with.
Hope this helps,
- Vern

Mar 24, 2012 | Operating Systems

2 Answers

Meaning


The most important program that runs on a computer. Every general-purpose computer must have an operating system to run other programs. Operating systems perform basic tasks, such as recognizing input from the keyboard, sending output to the display screen, keeping track of files and directories on the disk, and controlling peripheral devices such as disk drives and printers. For large systems, the operating system has even greater responsibilities and powers. It is like a traffic cop -- it makes sure that different programs and users running at the same time do not interfere with each other. The operating system is also responsible for security, ensuring that unauthorized users do not access the system.
Operating systems can be classified as follows:
  • multi-user : Allows two or more users to run programs at the same time. Some operating systems permit hundreds or even thousands of concurrent users.
  • multiprocessing : Supports running a program on more than one CPU.
  • multitasking : Allows more than one program to run concurrently.
  • multithreading : Allows different parts of a single program to run concurrently.
  • real time: Responds to input instantly. General-purpose operating systems, such as DOS and UNIX, are not real-time.
  • Operating systems provide a software platform on top of which other programs, called application programs, can run. The application programs must be written to run on top of a particular operating system. Your choice of operating system, therefore, determines to a great extent the applications you can run. For PCs, the most popular operating systems are DOS, OS/2, and Windows, but others are available, such as Linux.
    As a user, you normally interact with the operating system through a set of commands. For example, the DOS operating system contains commands such as COPY and RENAME for copying files and changing the names of files, respectively. The commands are accepted and executed by a part of the operating system called the command processor or command line interpreter. Graphical user interfaces allow you to enter commands by pointing and clicking at objects that appear on the screen.

    Apr 08, 2011 | Operating Systems

    1 Answer

    I cant format my window because when i click that will give me that ''not a valid win32 application''


    Exactly what are you trying to format? Usually you cannot/don't want to, format the drive you are working on? "not a valid win32 application" usually means, that the program you are trying to run, is a DOS based program. Formatting is usually done via DOS.

    Feb 26, 2010 | Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium...

    1 Answer

    Turbo c++ doesnot run on my vista bussiness edition


    Windows Vista does not support dos based (FAT16) applications., better to install Turbo C++ for Windows., it will work., Gudday !!

    Mar 09, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

    1 Answer

    Windows problem


    I would say the easiest thing to do with legacy programs is to run a virtualized version of an older windows OS within Vista.

    Visit VMWare Server to download their free product that can run in Vista. You can then "find" a windows 98 cd-rom image to install with. It is fairly easy, but there will be a little work getting Win98 running.

    This is probably the best way since you don't have to worry about compatibility with Vista, and also if the legacy app crashes it only crashes your VM and not your whole system.

    If you would like some more in-depth discussion about virtualization, just email me.

    Feb 10, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

    1 Answer

    Turbo-c++ is not installed in full screen


    Hi sagar,

    Turbo C++ 3.0 is made for MS DOS 6.22 environment. In windows also we can run Turbo C because windows environment provides all native services of DOS. But in Windows VISTA some of the services are revoked. So to enable them either Vista is to be reconfigured or some add-ins are to me installed.

    Other versions those can work in Vista are BOROLAND C++ 4.5, VISUAL C++ 6.0, and Visual Studio 2008. But in all these the graphics header file <graphics.h> will not work. Try to find an appropriate graphics header file or copy graphics.h in the cource directory and use #include "graphics.h" command in your C Program.

    Please revert to me if having problems.

    Zulfikar Ali
    ali_zulfikar@yahoo.com
    09899780221

    Jan 31, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

    2 Answers

    Not working


    Do a file search for cmd.exe and then you can create a shortcut on your desktop pointing to it and then in double quotes put the location of the application you are trying to execute, ie.. It should be located on c:\windows\system32 - cmd.exe

    C:\WINDOWS\system32\cmd.exe - in Properties Target and put this in double quotes and then your application with the full path in double quotes after that.

    Jul 26, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

    1 Answer

    Graphics devlopment


    sorry vishu Micro Soft Vista is not going to support full screen DOS mode in any mean.

    Thanks
    Iqbal

    Mar 30, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

    1 Answer

    Problem in dos application


    hi

    change your resolution to 800x600 or 1024x768 resolution.
    then right click the c++ exe then go to its property and go to screen enable the full screen. now u get the c++ editor in full screen.

    kishor.

    Mar 18, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

    1 Answer

    Old dos software


    the best software for emulating dos is Dosbox

    Mar 03, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

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