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I've bought a USB 3RCA data cable to project video from my Laptop to me TV/projector. However it doesn't work, and no signal appears to be received by either TV or Projectors... USB 3RCA Cable from PC to TV/Projector. I've searched help sites, and seen that Microsoft recommended Service Pack 2 resolved many of the video driver issues from USB ports, but my upgrade has had no effect... Can you help? Thanks

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I have the same problem?????

My computer doesnt even see that iv pluged it in !

I am using vista 32 bit service pack 1.

When i bought the cable it didnt come with a Driver (CD/DVD)

Posted on Aug 24, 2010

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I hope that is a USB driver issue when u plug your device does your computer detect any usb device and then its says unknown/unrecoginzed device. You have to check the cables first then you download USB2.0 driver install it inyour computer andl aslo try to connect the device in another port also put the the driver cd for the TV/projector

Posted on Jul 02, 2008

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I have a zx4800 touchscreen gateway and i want to conect it with the tv is it possible ?


You may be able to add a second monitor. You need a USB video adapter to get an external video port. There are no external video ports on the ZX4800 all-in-ones. Here is an example USB VGA adapter: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812225007 . DVI and HDMI versions also exist. These aren't the greatest solution so don't use them for gaming.

These will work if the TV has a compatible port. If your TV has VGA input, you are fine with this option. If your TV has HDMI inputs, you need to check the specifications. Some TVs have HDMI ports that do not interpret the signal from a computer. If your TV only has composite or component video inputs, you will need a converter from VGA (RGB) to the TVs input. (Component is YPbPr.) One option is http://www.ramelectronics.net/product.aspx?zpid=3294 . VGA to component video cables do not work; those are meant for projectors that understand the RGB encoding.

I hope this helps.

Cindy Wells

Dec 20, 2012 | Gateway GM5664 Desktop PC

1 Answer

Which cords and/or plugs should I use inorder to connect a projector to a computer


if your desktop doesn't have a standard vga socket then you can get a dvi adapter that fits onto the end of a vga lead. you will still need a seperate cable for audio as a dvi connection only does video.

Aug 02, 2012 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

I have a HP m7570n. How do I use a flat screen tv as a monitor


This depends on the TV's available inputs. The Pavilion m7570n has only a VGA output in the standard configuration.

Thus if the TV has a VGA port, turn off the computer and the TV. Then connect a standard VGA (RGB or D-sub 15-pin) m/m cable between the computer and the TV. To use the TV speakers, connect a 3.5 mm audio patch cable between the computers Line-out (green speaker port) to the VGA audio in. Turn on the TV and set the input to VGA (with the Source or Input button on the remote or the TV). Then turn on the computer. Windows XP should find the correct resolution to work with the TV. (If you turn on the TV after turning on the computer, you may get an unsupported signal. Press Ctrl-Alt-Del twice to restart the computer.) If it doesn't work, you may need to connect a different monitor and set the computer to a low resolution before connecting the TV and the computer.

If the TV only has composite or component video inputs, you will need a VGA to video converter (http://www.svideo.com/pctocomponent.html for example). A VGA to component cable will not work; those are for projectors that read an RGB input. TVs interpret YPbPr.

If you have added a video graphics card, you may have an HDMI and/or DVI port(s) on the card. In that case, check the specs of the TV. Some TVs will support HDMI or DVI-HDMI inputs from a computer. Others will not (since computer video signals are not the same as the signal from a set-top box). If you use a DVI-HDMI connector, make sure to use the HDMI port labeled for DVI and connect the audio cable as with the VGA connection. If you use an HDMI connection, you may need to set the sound properties to that of the HDMI port. (Find the control panel item for sound (under Hardware) and then select Manage Audio Devices. Set the Playback properties. If it doesn't work, use an audio patch cable.) Some TVs have RCA audio inputs for the HDMI-DVI connector. In that case, you will need a female 3.5 mm to RCA M/M adapter (if you use a 3.5 mm patch cable). There is a similar device if you want to use an RCA audio cable. You may need to enable the video ports on the graphics card before swapping monitors.

Some video cards have a TV out. In that case, connect the appropriate connector (should come with the video card). Then connect to the component, composite or S-video input on the TV.

Again turn off the TV and the computer before making any connections.

You will probably need to provide your own cables for must of these connection options.

I hope this helps.

Cindy Wells

May 12, 2011 | HP Pavilion m7570n (EX331AA) PC Desktop

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No instructions! do i need a lead to detect tv signals?


By "TV" Signals, do you mean video signals? If so, the WIndows video player does a good job of playing most varieties. If you mean off air or cable TV signals, you'll need a receiver. Look at the Elgato, or similar brands. They plug into a USB port and are capable of receiving analog and/or HD ATSC signals, or cable signals. Keep in mind that digital cable signals are generally a mess to identify and sort out because they are on different digital channels and subchannels. You may need a digital to analog converter in front of your Elgato to keep from going nuts trying to fighure out where everything is.

Nov 14, 2009 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

HP pc with built-in tv tuner


Have 9, 5 and 13 turned entirely digital as yet, so as to leave you without their signal?

From what you say, the tv tuner in your HP receives analog signals better than or instead of digital signals the stations you can receive may be analog while 9, 5, and 13 may have dispensed with their analog transmitters.

They don't have to until June, since the changeover was delayed from the original February cutoff date by Act of Congress. It is actually easier to receive a digital signal than an equally powered analog equivalent so the fact that your system worked so well with analog signals bodes well for the efficiency of your indoor antenna arrangement, though you may have to replace the possibly analog receiver in your pc with a usb digital thumbdrive like model to continue after the changeover is final.

Here's a tip...if the receiver in your pc resembles a square aluminum tin can, mounted on a PCI card in one of your slots, it is very likely analog and not digital.

Usually these receivers (or actually TUNERS) are heavily sheilded while digital receivers do not require the same amount of sheilding to avoid interference with other components, which is the concept of the big square tin can, that a digital tuner does not require.

Mar 27, 2009 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Hi. Love my projector. For some reason tonight, it wouldn't sync with my laptop for an important presentation. The cable works, because we used my cable (pin connector) to hook up the other projector....


Have you toggled the output display function key on your laptop. Should look like a Square Screen and Laptop symbol. Plug in the projector and keep pressing this button.

Jan 22, 2009 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

I cannot get my computer and Infocus LP10 to communicate. This is a new problem. In the past, I hooked everything up and when I powered up the camera and then powered up my laptop, all was well with my...


if you are trying to hook the laptop to the proyector, did you try right clicking on the desktop to view the properties of the screen?
you have to right click at the desktop, then go to properties, then go to the tab of configuration then click on the second screen that will apear, and when it greys out, you there is an option you have to click below that says "extend windows desktop to this monitor", of course, the proyector has to be already conected, when you already clicked that, touch the sync button of the proyuector and it should be working.. otherwise, at the windows of configuraton you have to click on advanced (wich is a button almost at the bottom of the window) and then a window will emerge and (on my version) there is a tab that its called like my video card of the laptop (in your laptop it should be called like your video card), and there must be an option (after you plugged the proyector) of sending the signal like something specific, like a signal for tv, or proyector,or monitor.. .i think it varies depending on the model of the video card.
well.. i think thats all about it.. wish you good luck in your lecture..
also.. check the cables!.. if they are old they could be broken at the begening of the conection... (did i explain that right?)

Apr 03, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

I AM TRYING TO TURN MY JVC TV INTO A MONITOR FORMY LAPTOP BUT I CANT SEEM TO GET THE RIGHT CHANNEL. I KNOW ITS NOTHING TO DO WITH MY LAPTOP SO ITS TO DO WITH THE T.V. I THINK I NEED SOME SORT OF CHANNEL TO...


hi dear


Laptop Multimedia Ports Info
video_out_imgpcmag.gif

Component Video Out: Connects a TV or HDTV to your notebook so you can view high-quality, high-definition video streaming from the notebook. This three-piece connection (color-coded red, blue, and green) is the best method for sending video from your notebook to an HDTV or anything that receives component video. This connection allows the chrominance (color) and luminance (brightness) portions of a video signal to be processed separately, thus producing higher-quality video than an S-Video connection. S-Video works similarly, but component video improves color accuracy even further by splitting the chrominance signal into two portions.
Composite In/RCA: Connects a gaming console or camcorder to your notebook, for viewing video or playing games on the notebook. Color-coded red, white, and yellow, composite video input uses standard RCA-style jacks to connect your notebook to receive video and audio signals from your TV, VCR, game consoles etc.
tv_tuner_imgpcmag.gif

TV Tuner/75-Ohm Coaxial: Connects a cable box, TV, or VCR to your notebook, so you can watch and record TV content on the notebook.
Sometimes called an Rf input, a 75-Ohm coaxial cable can carry video and stereo signals simultaneously. RF cable connectors (often called F-type connectors) screw onto the 75-ohm jack, are pushed onto it, or connect via a dongle that vendors usually supply.
spdif_imgpcmag.gif
S/Pdif/Dolby Ac3 Digital Out: Connects your notebook to speakers or a stereo receiver to play digital audio stored on the notebook. S/PDIF (Sony/Philips Digital Interface) is a standard audio-transfer file format, usually referred to as digital audio. This connection allows the transfer of audio without converting the signal to and from an analog format, which can degrade its quality. If you also have an S/PDIF In port, you can play digital music stored on an MP3 player through your notebook. The headphone jacks found on some notebooks double as S/PDIF Ports.
dvi_port_pcmag.gif
DVI: Connects a digital projector or LCD panel to your notebook to display in large format either video content or a PowerPoint presentation stored on the notebook. DVI (Digital Visual Interface) is a multipin connection used for passing standard-definition and high-definition digital video signals. It's found on HDTV tuners, a growing number of DVD players, HDTV-ready televisions, and some computer displays. DVI-D is the type of DVI connection found on most home video gear and carries digital-only signals. DVI-I is used with some computer video cards and can pass both digital and analog video signals. Some TVs have DVI-I inputs for greater hookup flexibility. DVI connections transfer video signals in pure digital form, which is especially beneficial if you're using a fixed-pixel display like a plasma, LCD, or DLP TV.

firewire_port_pcmag.gif
Firewire/ I.Link 400/ 1394: Connects a digital camcorder or external hard drive to transfer (but not display) large files, such as MPEG video, to your notebook. Also known as IEEE 1394, this is an extremely fast (commonly up to 400 megabits per second), two-way digital connection used for plugging in Your DV camera or other peripherals (such as an external hard drive or optical drive) to your notebook. It is used in digital camcorders because it is one of the few connections capable of quickly transferring full-motion video.
s_video_in_pcmag.gif
S-Video In: Connects a digital camcorder to your notebook to display video stored on the camera on your notebook's screen. Also, if your VCR has an S-Video Out port, you can transfer your VHS tapes to digital format. S-Video inputs use a four-pin jack to receive video signals from camcorders, gaming consoles, TV, or any device that has an S-Video out port. the S in S-Video stands for separate: S-Video connections transmit the chrominance (color) and luminance (brightness) portions of a video signal along different paths, allowing them to be processed separately, though S-Video does not produce as vivid an image as component video. This is a common way to display content from a digital camcorder or any device that has an S-Video Out port. (Firewire also transfers data files from your camcorder to your notebook, but it can't display video in real time on your notebook.)
S-Video Out: Connects a plasma or newer TV to your notebook to display video content streaming from the notebook. The most common way to connect a TV to a notebook, S-Video Out uses a four-pin jack to send signals from your notebook to your TV or anything that accepts S-Video In.

and use Fn+F5 or Fn + F4
to switch your ntbook to tv


oke

Mar 22, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

No input signal form a laptop to a projector


Hi jkoceng,

What type of interface cable are you using to connect to the projector? 15-pin VGA? S-video?

Generally on laptops if you look at the keyboard on the function keys (F1, F2, etc.) you'll see little icons such as adjustment of volume, brightness, etc. Look for one that looks like a monitor or screen. Usually this is on the F5 or F6 key. If the icon is blue, look for the corresponding key on the keyboard (Fn key, CTRL, Alt, etc.) and then hold that when connected to the projector while you press the appropriate function key. This should alleviate your problem.

Of course, you'll also want to be certain that you're using the correct input function on the projector.

Ben

Mar 13, 2008 | PC Desktops

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