Question about Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for PC

1 Answer

Want to give security to for every folder in windows server 2003

I m having two drive first is C:/ &D:/ in that there is full permission to access any folder . i want to that is i have three folder one is account , 2nd is design , 3rd is admin . & i have 30 user to use this folder and everry ten per son working on each folder which i want to make rule which
user cannot enter in one folder to another folder whithout my permission is this possible
or can i make password to paticular folder
for example i have folder which name is (kamran) for that i want to give permission to only three person so can i make it in server 2003 service pack 1

if u can say how to do but say step by step

Posted by on

  • kamran792 Jul 01, 2008

    i still dint get sollution so plz send me sollution

  • Anonymous Jul 01, 2008

    i have stiil same problem

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1 Answer

I m having two drive first is C:/ &D:/ in that there is full permission to access any folder . i want to that is i have three folder one is account , 2nd is design , 3rd is admin . & i have 30 user to use this folder and everry ten per son working on each folder which i want to make rule which
user cannot enter in one folder to another folder whithout my permission is this possible
or can i make password to paticular folder
for example i have folder which name is (kamran) for that i want to give permission to only three person so can i make it in server 2003 service pack 1

if u can say how to do but say step by step

Posted on Jul 02, 2008

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1 Answer

Remove the protection of removable drive


You have to be the computers administrator to change any values on any hard drive on your computer


click start control panel user accounts on the users tab click the name of the computer administrator you must have full control


click start click to open on my computer you should see your usb drive could be E: or something right click select properties there will be an array of options

select the sharing tab option then advanced sharing make sure you have a tick in the share this folder box


then click permissions make sure you have all 3 boxes ticked full control changes and read in windows 7


click start control panel user accounts click on the administrators account if you have made one or you will have to create one in windows XP

click start right click on my computer select open
Right click the icon of your usb drive (It should be E:/ or something)
Click Properties in the menu that comes up
Click the Sharing tab
Click permissions
And finally, click Allow next to Full Control.


if you need more help with this post a reply

hope it helps

Jul 16, 2012 | Operating Systems

1 Answer

I am trying to instakll adobe reader but it wont let me


Make sure your user account has administrator rights.
To determined your user account:
For Windows XP:
1. Click on Start then select Run
2. type control userpasswords2
3.Click on OK

For Vista and Windows 7:
1. Click on Start then on the bottom to search for Program or files
2. Type run
3. Click on Run then type control userpasswords2
4. Click on OK

If your user account has an administrative rights then there is problem on permission or ownership on the hard drive or a folder.
How to take ownership of a folder loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); You must have ownership of a protected folder in order to access it. If another user has restricted access and you are the computer administrator, you can access the folder by taking ownership.

To take ownership of a folder, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder or the hard drive that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties.
  2. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message (if one appears).
  3. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab.
  4. In the Name list, click your user name, or click Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group. If you want to take ownership of the contents of the folder, select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box.
  5. Click OK, and then click Yes when you receive the following message: You do not have permission to read the contents of directory folder name. Do you want to replace the directory permissions with permissions granting you Full Control?All permissions will be replaced if you click Yes.

    Note folder name is the name of the folder that you want to take ownership of.
  6. Click OK, and then reapply the permissions and security settings that you want for the folder and its contents.

Please let me know the exact error message when you try to install Adobe reader.

Apr 07, 2011 | Adobe Operating Systems

1 Answer

How can i set up network file sharing


First step is to check if the file sharing option is checked in my computer folder options.

Start- My computer- TOOLS - FOLDER OPTIONS- and click on the second tab VIEW- scroll down to the last option which will show as USE SIMPLE FILE SHARING.

Level 1: My Documents (Private) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); The owner of the file or folder has read and write permission to the file or folder. Nobody else may read or write to the folder or the files in it. All subfolders that are contained in a folder that is marked as private remain private unless you change the parent folder permissions.

If you are a Computer Administrator and create a user password for your account by using the User Accounts Control Panel tool, you are prompted to make your files and folder private.

Note The option to make a folder private (Level 1) is available only to a user account in its own My Documents folder.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 1, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Select the Make this Folder Private check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 2 (Default): My Documents (Default) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); The owner of the file or folder and local Computer Administrators have read and write permission to the file or folder. Nobody else may read or write to the folder or the files in it. This is the default setting for all the folders and files in each user's My Documents folder.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 2, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Make sure that both the Make this Folder Private and the Share this folder on the network check boxes are cleared, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 3: Files in shared documents available to local users loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); Files are shared with users who log on to the computer locally. Local Computer Administrators can read, write, and delete the files in the Shared Documents folder. Restricted Users can only read the files in the Shared Documents folder. In Windows XP Professional, Power Users may also read, write, or delete any files in the Shared Documents Folder. The Power Users group is available only in Windows XP Professional. Remote users cannot access folders or files at Level 3. To allow remote users to access files, you must share them out on the network (Level 4 or 5).

To configure a file or a folder and all the files in it to Level 3, start Microsoft Windows Explorer, and then copy or move the file or folder to the Shared Documents folder under My Computer.

Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • Power Users: Change
  • Restricted Users: Read
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 4: Shared on the Network (Read-Only) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); Files are shared for everyone to read on the network. All local users, including the Guest account, can read the files. But they cannot modify the contents. Any user can read and change your files.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 4, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Click to select the Share this folder on the network check box
  3. Click to clear the Allow network users to change my files check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
  • Everyone: Read
Network Share Permissions:
  • Everyone: Read
Level 5: Shared on the network (Read and Write) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); This level is the most available and least secure access level. Any user (local or remote) can read, write, change, or delete a file in a folder shared at this access level. We recommend that this level be used only for a closed network that has a firewall configured. All local users including the Guest account can also read and modify the files.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 5, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security
  2. Click to select the Share this folder on the network check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
  • Everyone: Change
Network Share Permissions:
  • Everyone: Full Control
Note All NTFS permissions that refer to Everyone include the Guest account.

All the levels that this article describes are mutually exclusive. Private folders (Level 1) cannot be shared unless they are no longer private. Shared folders (Level 4 and 5) cannot be made private until they are unshared.

If you create a folder in the Shared Documents folder (Level 3), share it on the network, and then allow network users to change your files (Level 5), the permissions for Level 5 are effective for the folder, the files in that folder, and the subfolders. The other files and folders in the Shared Documents folder remain configured at Level 3.

Jul 20, 2010 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

Passworded user from old pc to new pc


How to take ownership of a file loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); You must have ownership of a protected file in order to access it. If another user has restricted access and you are the computer administrator, you can access the file by taking ownership.

To take ownership of a file, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the file that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties.
  2. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message (if one appears).
  3. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab.
  4. In the Name list, click Administrator, or click the Administrators group, and then click OK.

    The administrator or the administrators group now owns the file.
To change the permissions on the file that you now own, follow these steps:
  1. Click Add.
  2. In the Enter the object names to select (examples) list, type the user or group account that you want to have access to the file. For example, type Administrator.
  3. Click OK.
  4. In the Group or user names list, click the account that you want, and then select the check boxes of the permissions that you want to assign that user.
  5. When you are finished assigning permissions, click OK.
  6. You can now access the file.
How to take ownership of a folder loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); You must have ownership of a protected folder in order to access it. If another user has restricted access and you are the computer administrator, you can access the folder by taking ownership.

To take ownership of a folder, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties.
  2. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message (if one appears).
  3. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab.
  4. In the Name list, click your user name, or click Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group. If you want to take ownership of the contents of the folder, select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box.
  5. Click OK, and then click Yes when you receive the following message: You do not have permission to read the contents of directory folder name. Do you want to replace the directory permissions with permissions granting you Full Control?All permissions will be replaced if you click Yes.

    Note folder name is the name of the folder that you want to take ownership of.
  6. Click OK, and then reapply the permissions and security settings that you want for the folder and its contents.

Source: Microsoft

Jan 21, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

1 Answer

Can not save a file or move a file to my desktop in vista.


Your account permissions are not set correctly. You need to change them so the account you are having problems with has the correct permissions. One way to do that is found here.

May 28, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

3 Answers

Network User Accounts


Hi Ben,

You have 6 people in your family. Are Bob and Fred the only person in your family having coursework? If they are the only ones then all you have to do is create a shared folder for both Bob and Fred. You can password the folder if you like so that only Ben and Fred will be able to access their coursework folders. You can place the shared folders either on the upstairs computer or the downstairs one, it does not really matter. So even when Fred is using the computer upstairs, Bob can still access his own coursework folder by using the computer downstairs. Hope it works for you.

Dec 25, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

1 Answer

File sharing


it is possible

If you have multiple computers in your home and they are connected through a home network, you can share files among your computers. That means you no longer have to copy files to a floppy disk or USB flash drive to transfer them to another computer. Once you configure your computer to share files, you (or another user with the appropriate permissions) can, by using Windows Explorer, open them from other computers connected to the network, just like you’d open files that are stored on a single computer. You can also choose to have folders visible—but not modifiable—from other computers on the network.
To share files on your computer with other computers on a network, you need to:
Share a folder on your computer. This will make all of the files in the folder available to all the computers on your network (you can’t share individual files).
Set up user accounts on your computer for everyone who needs to connect to your shared folder. If any of the accounts are Limited User accounts (unless an account is a Computer Administrator account, it is a Limited User account), follow the steps in Set permissions for files and folders to enable them to open your files.

To access shared files that are on another computer on your network, you need to:
• Connect to the shared folder from other computers on the network. This procedure is described in Map a network drive.

Note: By default, file permissions only allow your user account and administrators on your local computer to open your files, regardless of whether a person is sitting at your keyboard or at another computer. It may help to keep these three things in mind when setting up file sharing:
• Files have user permission settings.
• Every computer has its own user database.
• Some accounts are administrator accounts and some aren’t.

Configure your computer to share files To share a folder on your computer so that files stored in the folder can be accessed from other computers on your home network
1.
Log on to your computer as an administrator. For more information, see Access the administrator account from the Welcome screen.
2.
Click Start, and then click My Documents.
68599-click-my-documents.gif 3.
Right-click the folder that you want to share, and then click Sharing and Security.
68599-click-sharing-and-security.gificotip.gif Tip: If you want to share your entire My Documents folder, open My Documents, and then click the Up button on the toolbar. You can then select the My Documents folder.
4.
If you see a message that reads, As a security measure, Windows has disabled remote access to this computer, click the Network Setup Wizard link. Then follow the instructions in How to set up your computer for home networking. On the File and printer sharing page of the Network Setup Wizard, be sure to select Turn on file and printer sharing. If you do not see this message, skip this step and go to step 5.
68599-click-network-setup-wizard.gif Note: If you do not see the Network Setup Wizard link or the Share this folder on the network check box, your computer probably has Simple File Sharing disabled. This is a common change made to computers used for business. In fact, it happens automatically when a computer joins an Active Directory domain. You should follow these instructions to share a folder instead.
5.
In the Properties dialog box, select the Share this folder on the network check box.
68599-click-share-this-folder.gif 6.
If you want to be able to edit your files from any computer on your network (instead of just being able to open them without saving any changes), select the Allow network users to change my files check box.
68599-click-allow-network-users-to-change-my-files.gif 7.
Click OK.
68599-click-ok.gif Windows Explorer will show a hand holding the folder icon, indicating that the folder is now shared.
To connect to the shared folder from another computer, follow the steps described in How to map a network drive.
Note: By default, only you and other people with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder will be able to open your files. To limit access of specific users with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder, read How to set permissions for files and folders.

Aug 14, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

1 Answer

Access Dened on Local networked drive


if u r using NTFS you should go to the shared folder-->right click it-->click sharing and security -->go to security tab-->add the your user and give it full permission.

you may need to be logged with same user name on the other Pc that has the mapped drive .

Jul 07, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

1 Answer

Denying permissions to other users


You can make your Documents folder private from restricting the users access. You can do this while creating the user account.

Otherwise simply right click on the folder that you want to protect and go to Properties -> Security -> Edit -> add the user name -> enable deny permission

Bala

Jun 25, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

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