Question about Singer 7462 Mechanical Sewing Machine

1 Answer

Tension not right causing oops of thread along the stitch line.

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  • thehays Jul 02, 2008

    Great. Seems to have fixed the problem.



    Thanks



    George Hay

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  • Singer Master
  • 1,388 Answers

Please TRY the solution BEFORE giving your considered rating.




Ensure that all is clean and free of lint and jams, this is the most likely cause....now for tension troubleshooting .......

This solution is for tension problems...if you cannot form any sort of stitch, the issue is quite different, so please let me know if you need a different problem solved.....

It is quite long, but just work through each section in order.
The "knotting up" can reveal a lot. If you have loose threads on one side or the other, the tension on the opposite side will be the culprit.

QUICK SUMMARY FIRST:
Ensure sharp new needle,
Thread guides and Bobbin are Clean & Clear of lint
Set Top Tesion to 4 ....then....
Balance Bobbin to suit.

TOP THREAD TENSION:
If the looping threads are on the underside as you sew, it is the top tension. Top tension ought to be between 4 & 6 (this variation to allow for the different weights of fabric in your
projects).

IS YOUR NEEDLE SHARP ?
If you are using a needle that has seen quite a deal of work, or you suspect it may be blunt, change it for a new one !

TOP TENSION & GUIDES:
Make sure that when you thread the machine the presser foot is up so the thread goes between the discs and not to one side, top tension between 4 and 6, and that you have threaded through all the guides, including the last one, usually on the needle arm, just above the needle clamp.

It may be there is lint trapped between the discs, this will keep them slightly apart and reduce the actual tension, sometimes dramatically.

If tensions appear correct, and the thread is definitely in the channel between the discs, but still too loose and looping, try raising presser foot and remove your thread.

Now, with a 2" (50mm) wide strip piece of fabric 8 - 10" (20 - 25cm) moistened with methylated or denatured spirit, gently insert the fabric strip and clean between the discs with
a see saw / to and fro action.

In the worst cases, gentle use of a needle to pick & remove the jam may be necessary, but be very gentle and make sure the tension is set at Zero and the presser foot is raised, (to
disengage tension plates).... do not gouge or score the plates, they need a polished surface to work correctly.

BOBBIN TENSION:
Far less common, but if the loose threads are on the top, it is bobbin tension that is loose, it too may have lint in the spring and be giving a "false" tension.

I would not recommend fiddling with bobbin tension without good reason, it may end up with missing small screws and spring pieces, however, you can take the needle plate off to clean
the hook race area (where bobbin case sits)

...this is just good housekeeping, my wife does this every time she replaces the bobbin....

just take it out and clean the bobbin case and the fixed metal hook race with a small brush to remove lint. If there is a significant amount of lint, use a vacuum and small brush to get the worst.

Then wipe all this area with a cloth or cotton bud (Q tip) moistened (not soaked) with methylated spirit, especially if there appears to be fine dirty deposits....oil and lint combine to conspire against you.

If it seems likely that you ......really ....do .....actually .....need .....to adjust the bobbin case, first check there is no lint trapped in the metal spring where the thread is tensioned.

TOP LOADER:
Drop-in Bobbin case will look similar to this image with the tension screw in the middle of the metalwork....

tension not right causing oops - 4c76dc1.jpg ...the other screw at one end is holding it all together, so beware....it is not a tragedy to undo the whole lot and clean it, but very gingerly and lay the bits out in sequence and orientation, or you risk tearing your hair out !

FRONT LOADER:
....this is a bobbin case from a front loading machine and works in a very similar fashion to the top loader with drop in bobbin, again, if you dismantle it, take care so you can put it all
back properly.
165ca5c.jpg FINISHING UP
GETTING THE BALANCE RIGHT:
When you are certain there's no trapped lint in top tension or bobbin, set the top tension to 4 and the bobbin tension to a point where you just begin to feel resistance.

Try using good quality thread of contrasting colours so you can more easily spot the changes.

Set your zigzag to one width less than maximum (eg. 5 of 6 ...or... 4 of 5 etc) and sew a sample for a few inches and check the result.... adjust the bobbin tension screw very little at
a time, perhaps 1/16 of a turn.

You may find you are playing with this balance for some little while and if you are putting the needleplate on and off each time begin to think it cannot be correct to do this.....BUT....it is,
and eventually, you do get a "feel" for the correct tension and then it happens quite quickly.....as a user you won't be doing it very often unless there is lint built up (or are there small hands at work around the house !?!?!)

OTHER ISSUES:
If you live near the ocean as we do, salt air can play havoc with metalwork inside and out, so to help minimise this, keep a few small packets of dessicant (silica gel) in your machine
case....no case ? then make some sort of cover !

Same applies in any damp or humid environment, keep your machine dry and dust free.

Budget for a proper full service every couple of years (more often if heavily used) and if you don't use your machine for a few years, be aware that old oil will dry out and combining with
dust and form a "clag" like glue (another reason for some sort of cover, even a teatowel !)

FINALLY, A WORD ON THREAD:
If it is worth spending the time, energy and money on making something that you would like to give lasting enjoyment......use quality thread, .......it may seem to cost a little more at the
time, but the results, ease of use and added longevity will be worth the extra, and as a bonus, your tension troubles may be fewer and further between, because there is a more consistent diameter with good thread, and less compensating to be done by your tension plates and less thread breaks !


Posted on Jun 30, 2008

  • Bargain Box
    Bargain Box Jul 24, 2008

    Great...."fixed the problem" and have been given a "helpful" tag..........please be aware that our status is determined by your considered vote, and you have said it yourself, Fixed is Fixed ?!?!?!?!

    I despair at times and wonder if the time I spend answering problems is actually of any use to anyone when they don't bother to rate the solution at all, and then even more so when the rating devalues the effort spent,.......well, why would you ....

    The solution has taken a great deal of time to create and refine and has cost you NOTHING, so please, in future, rate things with the value they deserve......fixed is fixed.


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1 Answer

Bottom thread is still loose even if i try to balance the tension, how do i balance the thread tension?


You bobbin tension CAN be adjusted. First, thread your machine with different colors in the top and bobbin, set your top tension at its default, and run a line of straight, and then a line of zigzag stitches, and compare the results at the top and bottom. You will be adjusting your bobbin to your top tension. If the top tension looks like a straight line instead of stitching and the zigzag looks like "chicken tracks" instead of a zigzag, but the bottom looks like a zigzag, your bobbin tension is too loose.

Remove the bobbin case, and locate the straight-slot screw. There are generally two; one is a Phillips and one is straight--you want the straight one. Leave the other alone.

The rule is "lefty-loosy, righty-tighty." If your stitching displays the above symptoms, it needs to be tightened, so turn 1/4 turn to the right--no more--then test again. You will need patience, but don't turn more than that. It is easy to do, but if you don't do it systematically, you can make things worse, and very slight adjustments can alter the stitching significantly.

Apr 15, 2015 | Singer Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Brother 1034d serger skipping stitches. Stitches are loose even when adjusting the tension.


It appears that there are two issues: skipping stitches, and, loose stitches. Let's deal with them individually but first some general points to check.
1. Change both needles for completely fresh ones out of the package. Make sure that they are inserted all the way up, this is very important. The right needle should appear longer than the left one. Make sure also that you are using the correct needles for your serger.
2. Use a good quality thread with very little stretch, almost no fuzzies, and in pastel colour. Dark thread ages quicker, therefore has a shorter shelf live. A good quality sewing machine thread is also acceptable.
3. Make sure that the tension dials are clean and free of lint or other debris.
4. Re-thread the serger in this order, keeping the presser foot in the down position at all times
a) Upper looper. Ensure that the thread is securely embedded inside the tension discs. Place the thread tail under the presser foot to 11:00 o'clock and place the presser foot down again
b) Lower looper. This is the difficult one to thread but make sure that all the thread guides are properly threaded as well as the upper looper elbow. Check that the thread is lodged between the tension discs. Once the lower looper eye is threaded, place the thread in front and over the upper looper and then under the presser foot to 11:00 o'clock and place the presser foot down again.
c) Right Needle. Thread the right needle path, again ensuring that the thread is between the tension discs. Place the thread tail under the presser foot to 11:00 o'clock and lower the presser foot.
d) Left Needle. Proceed as with left needle.
e) Double check that all tension dials have their respective threads embedded between the discs by pulling firmly up on each thread above the tension dials.
f) Check that the stitch length is set to between 2.5 and 3.0, differential to normal, blade position to middle, blade is engaged, and upper looper converter not in use.
g) Set tensions to recommended setting for 4-thread overlock.
g) Make a test stitch out. How is it? Still having the same issue/s?
If yes, continue with the items listed below, otherwise have a great time serging.

Skipping Stitches:
1. Check that the looper tips are smooth. Burrs will cause problems.
2. Check that the needles match the type of fabric being sewn.

Loose Stitches:
1. Double check threading.
2. Debris caught between tension discs will also manifest itself in loose stitches. Take an 8" X 6" piece of medium weight clean and lint free cotton fabric, fold it in half length-wise and pass the fold only firmly between the tension discs from top to bottom (with the presser foot up and no thread in the tension dials).

Re-thread and test stitch. How is it now?

Sep 30, 2014 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

My Bernina Bernette 65 has a problem with the thread bunching up every 10-15 stiches on the bottom. Some of the thread stitches on the bottom of the fabric are in a straight line, and then the thread will...


try a new needle--one that is for the fabric being sewed
then try to adjust the top thread tension again, if the stitches remain loose and the tension won't adjust then the tension knob needs to be checked to see if there is something wrong with it.
also check to make sure the bobbin is inserted correctly into the bobbin case, if the bobbin is not turned the right way in the bobbin case the sewing machine will not stitch correctly.

Aug 05, 2013 | Bernina BERNETTE 65 Mechanical Sewing...

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The bottom stitching looks like a line and not stitches the top stitching is fine


whether its bias or straight does not matter to machine. loosen the bobbin tension and put more tension on take up spring by inserting a screwdriver in the slot of the top thread tensioner. turn to right.

Dec 13, 2012 | Juki DDL8300N Sewing Machine

1 Answer

How do you adjust the tension on a Bernina 180


There are two tension adjustments, which should be done with a proper set of weight gauges - top and bottom thread tension should be carefully balanced to get the best stitch formation. It is best that you assume the top tension is correct and adjust the bobbin tension to match. Load the bobbin with thread of one colour and put a spool of the same thread but a different colour on the top. Thread-up the machine, load the bobbin and sew-off a satin-stitch on max width zig-zag. In this configuration, there should be a very small 'bead' of the top thread showing along each side of the satin-stitch on the underside of the material. If there's excessive top showing, the bobbin tension is too high and if none, the bobbin tension is too low. To adjust the tension, remove the bobbin case and you will see a spring around the edge with two screws through it. One of the screws holds the spring in place and the other adjusts the tension - this is furthest from the edge of the spring and is in a small 'cup' in the spring itself. To reduce tension, turn the screw VERY SLIGHTLY anticlockwise and to increase it turn it clockwise. Make very slight adjustments and re-check sewing-off the satin-stitch every time until you get the required thin line of top showing down each side of the stitch on the underside. Ideally this should be done with Mettler Metrosene thread, but as we're just balancing against the top tension, it shouldn't matter too much provided you use a good thread top and bottom.

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1 Answer

When sewing, the top stitch and thread is fine. when you look under it is a huge mess of upper thread. I have cleaned shuttle, fixed the bobbin, replaced bobbin and upper thread. A number of times.


Recheck the tension on the top thread. Test it before you put it through the needle to see if there's any tension. It should pull but with some resistance. Also check the needle and make sure it is the right type for the fabric and not bent etc.

Looping on the underside of the stitch is from the upper thread, usually tension problem. But do check the bobbin tension and make sure it isn't too tight, though that's not usually the problem you're describing. The two tensions need to work together in order to get a nice, flat (not puckered or loopy) stitch.

One last thing you might check too, though again this wouldn't typically be the problem - is the dogfeed moving the material along under the presser foot correctly?

Most of the time the problem you're describing is due to not enough tension on the upper thread.

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1 Answer

The thread underneath when sewing is too loosed


Usually thread too loose on the bottom is caused by the upper tension being too loose. The top and bottom tensions work together with the top thread making the underside of the stitch seem too taunt or too loose and the bobbin thread causing the top side of the stitch to be loopy or too tight. Select a large zig zag stick and sew a couple of inches. Then examine the stitch. It should look identical on both sides. Look to see which side is drawn too tight, the zig zag being smaller on that side with threads from the bottom threads pulled through. Then adjust the two tensions so that they make a uniform, identical stitch.

Also, when the bobbin tension is right you can hold the bobbin dangling by the thread and it won't spool out to the floor but will let loose a bit with a slight flick of the wrist. Too loose it will just spool out. Too tight and it won't drop at all. When you get that set right then do the above zig zag test to see where the top tension should be set.

Mar 02, 2011 | Sewing Machines

2 Answers

The top thread is looking good, the bottom stitch is bunching up


re-thread the top, when the top looks good but the bottom is bad it is the top thread

Oct 16, 2009 | Necchi Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Loose stitch


Welcome to FixYa. I am the sewing machine expert that chose your issue to solve.

When everything seems to be working fine and an occasional stitch is loose.....now get ready.......here it is.......the needle!

It seems impossible, but the needle is the most neglected part of the machine. The one you are using could be slightly bent or have a slight burr that you won't see with the naked eye. Also, needles, especially in an embroidery machine (which work their buns off), are only good for about 8 hours of cumulative use. I would say that an embroidery needle should be retired after 3 or 4. They get dull like a razor blade which can cause enough drag to create a timing issue that's barely perceptible.
Welcome to FixYa! I am the sewing machine expert that chose to help you with your issue.

There are really only two things that can cause bottom (note: remember that problems with the bottom thread, almost always comes from the top and not the bobbin. Bobbins rarely need tension adjustments). These two things are:
  1. An area was missed when the machine was threaded (most machines have an arrow at each area on the thread path where the thread MUST run or the stitch on the bottom will be sloppy. Threading can be tricky and even the most experienced miss once in a while.
  2. The tension adjustment mechanism in the thread path. If the thread is not properly through this area, the thread on the bottom will be sloppy or if, threaded properly, and the tension is set too loose, the stitch will be sloppy. If the tension is set too tight, the bottom thread will be tight and pucker the fabric.
It is counter-intuitive that problems with the top tension cause problems with the bottom stitch but it sure will.

So try it and see if that helps.

Thanks for using FixYa.com

P.S. - If you find that the solution/answer I provided led you to, or resulted in a fix, please close the ticket with a FixYa! rating. I would be very grateful for your show of appreciation.
If it hasn’t, please do not assign a rating just yet. Please post back as to what steps you took, results, etc, and I will try to assist you further.



Jan 31, 2009 | Bernina Bernette 75

1 Answer

Machine not stitching


Hi there!

This is nearly always down to the top thread tension being too tight.

At some point before the stitch-arm, there should be a tension wheel or adjuster.
Back it waaaaaay off, and spread the plates to see if there is any trapped thread in there. Clean it out if there is.

Then rethread as normal. Tighten down the top tension wheel untill you feel it bite on the thread when you pull it through. About the same drag as pulling a teacup along a table is good.

Also make sure the bottom bobbin is in the right way around. I don't know why, but it does make a difference to the tension.

If this helps at all, rate as Fixya.
If not - contact me again and we'll try something else.
Thanks for posting.

Jun 14, 2008 | Sewing Machines

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