Question about Cambridge Audio Azur 640P Amplifier

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Sound Distortion When listening to music (from classical LPs) phono pre-amplified by the 640p, higher volume passages sound quite distorted. I have a MM catridge and have made sure that my turntable is connected to the MM port of the 640p. Furthermore between musical cuts (where there is no music) groove noise appears to be quite audible.

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  • brackster Jul 01, 2008

    Yes. I still need a solution to this problem.
    I am using Apple SoundTrack Pro to record the records. There are now clipped signals in the recording. Yet, the louder passages of piano sonatas sound distorted. The medium volume passages sound great, very clear and authentic but the high volume passages sure sound very distorted. When I use my Technics Receiver of the 1980s, there are now distortions whatsoever, everything else being the same. The final clarity of the recording is just as good. You have to tell me, why would I still want to use your product?


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  • Master
  • 682 Answers

Use sonic slide switch and make ground connection between your 640p and turntable.-check cables and test with another good cables.-shut down any light dimmer around you and test.

Posted on Jul 15, 2008

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2 Answers

Sound is distorted at certain frequency / volume what would cause this?


More infornation is required to provide a real answer, but I can give you a few possibilities:

1) There is a problem within the feedback loop that is allowing some frequencies through. This will be more prevelant at higher volume levels.

2) If there is a tube pre-amp section, the tube can be "microphonic". This too is generally more likely at higher volume levels.

3) Defective components in the amp section. These may pass some DC voltages that will sound like distortion.

If you can, please experiment a little to try to find when the problem is most obvious. With more details about when the problem occurs may give us enough info to determine the cause. Otherwise a trip to a service shop that has access to test equipment will be required.

Dan

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4 Answers

Audio output


but the real tek must be ur audio driver.

was the same one bundled with ur mother board disk?

Jun 16, 2008 | ION Audio iTTUSB Turntable

Tip

How Loud Can it Go?


I don't know if I ever installed a sound system to any concert fan who didn't ask me this question. So how loud can I safely play my sound system?

If you have a receiver or amplifier that has an analog dial that goes from 7 o'clock to 5 o'clock the majority of units will output maximum volume at around 1 o'clock assuming a line level signal is sent to it (again it varies a lot from piece to piece). Anything higher then that and the unit will send out a distorted signal colloquially referred to as "clipping". Most modern units now use digital volume controls and everyone is different. The only way to detect this distortion is listen to when the music sounds tinny and harsh instead of clean and musical.

If you do not find it is loud enough for your liking you must invest in a more powerful amplifier or higher efficiency speakers; or you will continue to destroy your innocent speakers and blame them for your over driven amplifier.

on Jan 27, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I thought there was a problem with the speakers or receiver, but after turning off the speakers and listening to the sound from the needle, it appears that the distortion is coming from the turntable. The...


The "needle", now called a "stylus", doesn't produce anything on its own. At the worst, the tip will shear off and it will slide across and damage the vinyl. So probably your "cartridge" is defective. Now, most low rumbling distortion would come from your turntables motor or platter bearings. Also if you unplugged the Phono leads from the preamp ports in the back of your amp and the noise goes away then you have learned that the amplifier is not producing the effect. Does this help?

Jul 03, 2009 | Stanton ST-150 Turntable

3 Answers

Distorted sounds


The AT-PL120 uses a magnetic cartridge to extract a music signal from the record. Magnetic cartridges all put out a very weak electric signal, and so their output must be strengthened, or amplified, to where it is as strong as the input from, say, a CD player. This amplification is provided by a pre-amp. If your receiver has dedicated "phono" inputs the pre-amp circuits are already in the receiver. If you do not have dedicated phono inputs you must either buy a pre-amp, or buy a magnetic cartridge turntable with a pre-amp built into itself. The AT-PL120 has a built in pre-amp. You can switch the AT-PL120's preamp on or off. The switch is located under the platter at the back side of the turntable. Take the platter mat off and turn one of the platter's holes to the back and you should see the switch through the hole. If you push the switch to LINE OUT the preamp is turned on and the turntable sends an amplified cartridge signal out the cables which MUST be connected to a receiver inout suitable for a CD player (a "high level" input). If you push the pre-amp selector switch to PHONO OUT the turntable sends the weak unstrengthened cartridge signal out the cables which MUST be connected to the receiver's dedicated PHONO inputs so the signal can be amplified with the receiver's own pre-amp circuits.

If everything is set wrong (i.e. LINE OUT (pre-amp on), and connected to phono inputs) you are applying two steps of strengthening to the turntable's signal which is too much. The resultant sound will be garbled. Try not to do this!

The other way to do everything wrong is set the pre-amp switch to PHONO OUT (pre-amp off) and connect the turntable's cables to a high level input. If this happens the turntable signal receives no amplification and the resultant sound will be thin and weak.

May 09, 2009 | Audio Technica AT-PL120 Turntable

1 Answer

WEAK SOUND WHEN CONNECTED TO DURABRAND AMP


The electrical output from a turntable actually comes from the cartridge on the tone arm. Specifically, it's generated by an interaction between a magnet and a coil inside the cartridge. They come in two types, MC ("moving coil") and MM ("moving magnet") according to which of the two elements moves and which is fixed. MM cartridges produce more current but MC cartridges usually sound better. No matter which you have though, the total output is too low for the regular line inputs on amplifiers. Ten or twenty years ago, amps has special "phono" inputs. This would have a special pre-amplifier in it that would amplify the cartridge's singal to a level suitable for the rest of the amp. Most amps having a phono input only deal with MM cartridges, which have a higher signal.

I use an MC cartridge with an amp that doesn't have a phono input at all; therefore I needed to buy a special external phono pre-amp. I bought a Musical Fidelity X-LPS. But cheaper pre-amps do exist.

Apr 13, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Speaker distortion on high end


Sounds like classic dry joint on speaker terminal ROTELS are well known for it,if you can use a soldering iron or know someone who can resolder the pins where these terminals are connected,always make sure amp is unplugged from wall socket before ...

Dec 18, 2008 | Onkyo M-282 2-Channel Amplifier

1 Answer

Sound in computer is raspy


Distortion usually happens when a sound is amplified too much. The key to solving it is finding out where the amplification is happening.

If you've got your "wave" volume at max, and your "main" volume at minimum (or vice versa), you might experience distortion. Try reducing the higher one, and raising the lower one.

Sep 17, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

James


Do you have the amp bridged first off? if you do unbridge it. Next,

1) Turn all the settings all the way down on the amp.
2) Turn your bass on the radio into the negatives (-2 or-3)
3) Turn the volume up to the point where your highs start to not sound good, then turn them down just enough to where they sound good again.
4) Turn your crossover to about half if your box is ported, or three Fiths if its sealed.
5) Raise your gain slowly untill either the volume doesn't get any higher or you hear the subs start to sound funny. Now turn it down just a hair.
6) Turn your crossover up a hair then down a hair and see what happens, if it gets a touch louder with out distortion then leave it. If it losses clarity then place it back to where it was.
7) Listen to a couple songs you know well and stand in front of your subs at volume to be sure theres no distortion.

You should be good at this point let me know if you need something else.

Dec 02, 2007 | Rockford Fosgate Punch P2002 Car Audio...

1 Answer

Using a tube pre amp with my CA Azur 640A?


There are many answers to your questions but Ill have a go with the basics...
Audio connections should be matched.... its called Frequency impedance,.... to get a signal along wires or cables (or Fibre) the Impedance of the cables and wires must be matched to the device they are connected to transfer the signal along the cables without distortion...

Manufacturers provide many sockets on the input side of amplifiers and preamplifiers to allow the consumer to connect various devices of different impedance.

They label these inputs like CD, or Tuner, or PHONO etc etc,

That means if you have a CD player it must be plugged into the CD input socket then the impedance will be correct and the sound will transfer along the CD cables correctly, without distortion..same with the Phono input etc...
You will find on the sound output to the speakers terminals are also labelled 4-6ohm, or 8-10ohm, these are the impedance expected for the coil ratings of the speakers them selves and its important to get the correct speakers to the correct out put terminals...

In your case all you have to do is follow these simple rules and all will be well....you say you have a squeeze box well there probably isnt a port labelled squeeze box so you need to experiment and try out each input port for the squeeze box to see what input gives you the correct sound output...Watch the Phono inputs as these are very sensative to input sound levels and must be treated very carefully as they have a double stage of sound amplification and as such you need to have the volume right down when connecting up the Phono inputs then increase the volume carefully after the cable connections are completed.

If you follow these rules then all will be well,,,,there is no difference if the Pre amp or Power amp is valve or transistor or FET or has IC outputs to the speaker the same impedance rules apply..just treat it as a box with input and output terminals and all the impedance will be taken care of for you...if you read the lables...

You need to connect you signal source to the Preamp inputs the out put from the Preamp connects to the power amp input then the power amp output goes to the speakers. this is a basic configuration for sound systems, there are other variations but are outside this discussion.

Cheers From YUBEUT

Nov 12, 2007 | Cambridge Audio Azur 640A Amplifier

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