Question about Nikon Travelite IV

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Lens out of alignment

The lens seems to be out of alignment. I can focus the lens' with each eye but viewing together results in the one lens "dropping" slightly. Especially noticable when looking at a straight line object.

They retails for about $90 online - is it worth sending in for repair or just buying a new pair ?

Thanks ... Meschi

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5 Suggested Answers

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SOURCE: My Nikon Action 16 X 50--4.1 --serial number 715480BJ

id take thm back then the prisems may be out of line

Posted on Jan 29, 2008

  • 112 Answers

SOURCE: Lens Caps

try...15165474200 or 1800 645 6678...hope this

Posted on Dec 02, 2008

lock123
  • 6831 Answers

SOURCE: I see a double image through my Nikon Travelite 12x24s

Hello Scott

While I am mostly a camera expert , I have seen the problem that you are describing. Inside the camera there is a little reflector which is used to invert the picture and focus it to the viewing eyes.

These reflectors are stuck to the camera casing using epoxy and the problem is that with time the epoxy becomes brittle and cracks. When it is cracked , the lens will move out of it's fixed posistion but the epoxy does not always break loose fully which is why you do not hear any rattle.

You could attempt to open it up and glue the lens back into posistion using some new epoxy , but you could possibly have some problems with the screws of they are not standard.

In this case ask a jeweler to repiar the binocular for you as this should not cost much to repiar...no more than $15.

Kind Regards
Andrea

Posted on Dec 30, 2009

  • 6 Answers

SOURCE: my wife dropped her binos.

Pat, Drop me a line and I"ll see what I can do for you. bart bbk940@verizon.net

Posted on Dec 31, 2010

Obertelli
  • 3006 Answers

SOURCE: Brand new and out of

Return them for a refund or exchange. Either the prisms need adjusting or the eyepiece carrier yoke has got bent in transit and neither are user-fixable items.

Nikon are usually excellent, but like all such products only a small sample are quality tested during production, so it's inevitable that a few rogue faulty examples will eventually reach customers.

Posted on Aug 13, 2011

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Everything you need to know to become an expert:
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I see a double image through my Nikon Travelite 12x24s


Hello Scott

While I am mostly a camera expert , I have seen the problem that you are describing. Inside the camera there is a little reflector which is used to invert the picture and focus it to the viewing eyes.

These reflectors are stuck to the camera casing using epoxy and the problem is that with time the epoxy becomes brittle and cracks. When it is cracked , the lens will move out of it's fixed posistion but the epoxy does not always break loose fully which is why you do not hear any rattle.

You could attempt to open it up and glue the lens back into posistion using some new epoxy , but you could possibly have some problems with the screws of they are not standard.

In this case ask a jeweler to repiar the binocular for you as this should not cost much to repiar...no more than $15.

Kind Regards
Andrea

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I bought these for my husband. In trying them


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take it into an outdoor shop and they can check the mirror alignment, seems that it may have "altered' itself

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