Question about Philips Magnavox MWR20V6 DVD Recorder/VCR

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VCR tape playback not good

Picture and sound are very poor when videotapes are played back. These tapes were recorded from tv on a Magnavox VCR I no longer use and hoped to use the new DVD/VCR combo to transfer the old tapes onto DVD. Quality of the tapes is good and played very well on the old machine. Is there something I am missing in the instructions? Thanks for any help.

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  • Anonymous Mar 17, 2014

    VHS tapes have a loud buzzing sound during playback. DVD less noticeable. Combo even buzzes when just turned and nothing is playing. Any thoughts?

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This may sound silly, but try it. Rewind the tape, then take a spoon end and put it in the same rewind wheel and simply tighten it. Reload it. This should make it track better then before.

Posted on Dec 04, 2011

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Check your "tracking" If the tape played fine in the old machine, then tracking is the answer, provided that the new machine records good.

Posted on Jun 27, 2008

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1 Answer

Samsung DVD-V3650 Combo Player ejects most videotapes without playing them


You can only compensate for minor scratches. As for the vcr side the rollers could be dirty or the brake worn out. The tensioner may be too sensitive as well. Basically the mechanism probably needs servicing.

Sep 06, 2016 | Samsung DVD-V3650 DVD Player/VCR

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How a VCR and Videotape Work and the Most Common Problems


A common complaint about videotape is that over time, playback becomes unstable and often deteriorates to the point that the tape becomes unplayable or that the tape works on one VCR, but not another. All of these problems can be traced to tape path alignment in the VCR and damage to the tape itself. I will address each issue separately.
First you need to understand a little about the tape media. When you record on VHS videotape, the recorder lays down three (four for stereo sound) magnetic tracks on the ½ inch wide tape. Analog audio is recorded along the top edge as a thin horizontal stripe (or parallel stripes for stereo) for the entire length of the recording. In the center of the tape, video is recorded as diagonal parallel stripes by two or four heads that rotate on a drum at 360 RPM. On the bottom edge (the most vulnerable place for damage to occur) there is another horizontal track that is critical to playback. It is the sync track and it's purpose is provide the VCR with the feedback it requires to maintain the tape speed within extremely tight parameters. If the tape does not move at a precise speed, the picture and sound can become unstable to the point that it will be unusable.
As you record, a fixed frequency sine wave is recorded on the sync track. If during recording, the tape speed increases or decreases, it will be reflected on the sync track. During playback, the VCR's circuitry senses the small millisecond-to-millisecond speed fluctuations of the tape movement over the heads and adjusts the speed so the tape speed always matches the speed at which it was recorded. If the sync track is ever damaged, your tape can become useless.
Unfortunately, videotape is a very delicate media. It is easily damaged and once damaged, it usually cannot be repaired. The most common failure is due to tape stretch. Videotape is not very elastic. Anything more then slight tension during use can stretch the tape to the point that it cannot rebound. If the sync track is stretched, the recorded frequency will change and the VCR will react accordingly by making incorrect speed corrections resulting in picture and sound disruptions. Your recorder has tensioning arms that control tape tension as it moves through the system. If the tension in the tape path is incorrectly adjusted, the tape will be damaged as it is recorded or played.
Improper storage is the other common cause of edge damage. If you lay your cassettes flat for prolonged periods, the weight of the tape above will press against the sync track and can damage it. Always store your tapes vertically. Extremes in temperature and humidity can cause stretch. Store tapes in a cool dry place. Also, periodically restack your tapes. To restack a tape, put it in your recorder and fast-forward it to the end and back to the beginning. That will redistribute the tension on the tape. After playing a tape, always restack it once or twice. I have a large collection; over 1,000 tapes. I cannot restack them all on a regular basis. But when I play them, I take that as an opportunity to restack them.
Now that you understand some basics about the media, I will now turn you attention to your VCR. As I hope you are starting to understand, proper playback requires precise alignment of many moving elements. The two broad categories are tape path alignment and head alignment. None of this is a do it yourself job. In addition to specialized electronic test equipment, VCR alignment requires specialized tools along with expensive custom made for the brand and model alignment jigs along with (again expensive) alignment tapes. The alignment tape is important beyond the obvious. In order for a tape recorded on one machine to play properly on another, the two machines must have matching alignment. VCR manufacturers record their own alignment tapes using precisely and frequently aligned recorders. The tapes are used to align a specified number of VCRs and then discarded because each time a tape is used it wares. Since there is a uniform standard for these tapes, a tape recorded on one brand of VCR should play on another. That is the theory.
Now for the real world; the consistent interchangeability we all wish for is hard to maintain. Consider this. The tolerances that must be maintained at every point in all of the processes relative to VCRs and tapes are very close to what is possible; little room for slight variations. Since the tolerance for one part of the process may accumulate with another part of the process either mathematically positively or negatively, it is often the case that each individual part of the chain is within tolerance, but the sum total is out of tolerance.
What in plane language does this all mean? Two alignment tapes made on the same machine will be different. Tapes from different manufactures will be different. The tape you local technician or factory service center uses will have inconsistencies. The net effect is that two seemingly properly aligned machines may not be able to properly play each other's tapes.
I do not mean to suggest that you should not have your VCR properly aligned and maintained by a professional. My point is that videotape is an old technology with flaws that could not fully be overcome in the time frame that it would have been profitable for manufacturers to do so. That is why we have moved on to digital technologies. My advice is to enjoy your videotapes while you can. They will not last forever. If you have important tapes, transfer them to digital media to protect your memories as soon as possible.

on Jul 03, 2015 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

Tape playback on Magnavox MWR20V6


When was the last time you ran the "head cleaning" tape in the machine? As tape collects dust and dirt - it gets deposited on the recording and playback heads. This ruins playback and recording quality. Also, since tape is magnetic - they tend to magnetize the heads, too (just like reel to reel, 8 track & cassette player / recorders). Demagnetizing them will help too. Here are links to both products:

head cleaner

head demagetizer

Feb 26, 2015 | Magnavox Televison & Video

1 Answer

When playing back vcr tapes on my magnavox ZV427MG9 A, i have a tracking problem with tapes recorded on slp. i get white streaks on the playback, and manual tracking does not help. tapes recorded on s


The VCR has at least four "heads" two are for 2 hr and two for 6 hour (sp and slp)

It is most likely one of the heads used in the SLP mode is slightly blocked with tape debris--heads need to be manually cleaned in the right way.

Jun 16, 2012 | Magnavox ZV427MG9 DVD Recorder VCR

1 Answer

Sound goes up and down when recording with VCR tape on Magnavox ZV457MG9. I have tried different tapes and get the same problem. When you play the tape back the volume goes up and down


This is usually caused by poor contact between the tape and heads or the tape fluctuating as it goes through. First try a cleaning tape and see if that improves matters.Then get a friend to show you how to clean the tape path with alcohol and q tips.I assume there is no picture disturbance? There could also be other reasons like the auto level not working properly but start with the basics.
I hope I have been of help but please do not hesitate to ask if you have any further questions.
I appreciate your vote if you appreciate my reply.

Feb 25, 2011 | Magnavox ZV457MG9 DVD Recorder VCR

1 Answer

Have a toshiba tp 61H95 proj TV- want to connect panasonic dvd recorder and toshiba vhs recorder so I can copy family videos to dvd- can't get hook ups set up for both to work.


Select AV-1 or some thing in TV and plug DVD recorder Video-Audio output in AV-1 input of TV, playback any DVD and confirm its picture and sound in TV. Press Stop button of DVD recorder to stop playback.
Now plug Video-Audio output of VCR in DVD recorder input and select AV Input in DVD recorder, insert VHS tape in VCR and playback it and confirm you get VHS picture and sound in TV via DVD recorder.
Hookup between TV, DVD recorder and VCR is completed.
Playback VHS tape in VCR, Insert blank DVD disc in DVD recorder and press Record while you see VHS tape picture in TV.
Hope this info will help you.

Feb 03, 2010 | Toshiba TP61H95 61" Rear Projection...

1 Answer

Playback Problem


open the recorder, 4 screws at each corner, wipe the playing head and the voice reccognition head, to the right of the playing head head with a baby wipe, you will be amiazed what **** comes off it. DON'T scrub it just wipe lightly, spin the playing head so it's clean. If you have a lint free cloth ( a glasses cleaning cloth you get in the case is brilliant) Try the tape (before you put it in make sure everything is DRY!) and your problem should be solved. It worked for me! and that came from a TV engineer

Jul 15, 2009 | Toshiba RD-XS25 DVD Recorder/HDD Recorder

1 Answer

VCR playback sound and pciture don't match


That is a tape path issue. The new VCR has the problem, usually the guide post for the tape sticks out when it shouldn't making the sound late for the picture because the gap between the video head and audio head is wrong.

Mar 31, 2017 | Philips Magnavox 20MC4304 20 in....

1 Answer

VHS Recording Tape


not much of a help but sounds like your record head is bad on the vhs heads,

use cleaning tape try that, if that fixes great, if it helps but not fully there, you might have to clean them by hand with very soft paper town and rubbing alcohol rub side to side very easy , if none of the above work you have a bad record head or record board, not worth repair vs cost
good luck

Aug 25, 2007 | Philips Magnavox 20MC4304 20 in....

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