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Aperature: Stays wide open. - Olympus Camedia C-765 Digital Camera

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Again your manual will tell you how to close the aperature. If you do not have the manual, you should be able to download one from the camera site.

Posted on Jul 26, 2008

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FEE keeps flashing with aperture ring nikor lenses


Your aperture lenses should be set to the biggest f-stop (smallest aperture)

Jun 07, 2010 | Nikon D70s Digital Camera

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Dear sir,i purcahsed d90 cam but result is not good wat can i do ? wat can do setings get good result


The d90 takes excellent pics, but you need to understand the settings. White balance determines the accuracy of the color by setting what the camera sees as whit compared to what you do. Then you need to set the ISO, which is how sensitive it is to light. The higher the number, the more sensitive. In super bright situations you may need to go as low as 200, 800 in lowlight. 400 is a good average, 100 is rarely used. then your aperature value (a/f) this determines how much light the camera actually lets in, not to be confused with the sensitivity (ISO) which is specifically how sensitive the film is (not that you have any). Then is the shutter speed, which is how long the camera exposes the film when you hit the button-for fast moving objects, you want the shutter to open and close really fast so it doesn't blur;if it stays open too long it will capture the object in motion-if someone is running and you have a slow speed, the image could be the runner taking three steps as opposed to a still picture. To start.your setting when you take a pic, look at how much light you have. For indoors with no lights on during the day or outside cloudy, ISO 400. In at night with bright lights or outside sunny day, ISO 800. Then determine the speed of your object. A good standard for slow objects is 1/20-1/60. Set that, then set your aperature (f value) so the picture looks at the right brightness. If you adjust the aperature all the way and still need more or less light, adjust the shutter. Then cycle through your white balance options to make sure your color looks right and take a picture. If it comes out really grainy, your light settings were not right, you should pay attention to your ISO and aperature settings.

Mar 29, 2010 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

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I can't take a picture. It reads on the top right ''F--'' and on the bottom right ''r07''


The F means that the lens is not reading properly. The reason for this depends on the lens, but it's usually because the contacts between the lens and the camera are dirty. Remove the lens and clean them with a cotton swab dipped in alcohol.

If you're using an older lens, you may also have put the lens in manual aperature mode. You should select the aperature marked with the red if you have an old lens. (New lenses won't allow you to set aperature with the lens...so this isn't a problem.)

Oct 02, 2009 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

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I have a code fEE. I can't shoot. What's up?


Usually means that you have a lens with the aperature in the wrong setting for use on an auto aperature camera. Look at the lens and move the aperature setting to the red marking.

Don't feel bad, this one got me for about a half a day two different times the first time I put on my new 50mm f1.8 lens. Great lens, but I'd never had an "old style" lens before.

Just for reference, if you put an old manual lens on your D80, it will show F-- in the aperature display and won't take pictures except in "M".

Sep 01, 2009 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

Dark pictures


Your aperature setting is too close. Go to menu and go to your aperature setting it allows how much light is let in open it up a setting at a time until you have enough light to get great photos.

Feb 10, 2009 | Fuji FinePix S7000 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Cannot take indoor photos without flash


Hello,

Just as "Wrestling" explained, your camera is operating properly. There simply isn't enough light in the scene that you are trying to photograph. If you're new to photography, it's sometimes hard to remember that the human brain/eye combination is an incredible thing, and no camera can compete with a human being.

What I mean is, there is enough light in your room for your eyes to see detail, but not enough for your camera to 'see' the detail without additional light from your flash. However, there are a couple things you can try.

1. Raise the ISO setting on your camera (check your manual, it's easy). Turn the camera on, press and hold the ISO button (left top of camera) and rotate the main command dial (back of camera, upper left corner). Rotate left or right to lover or raise the ISO number. Watch in the top information panel as the ISO numbers change. Higher ISO numbers mean the camera is more sensative to light; you can take pictures when there is less light available. HOWEVER, there is a trade-off. The higher your ISO number, the more noise/grain your image will have. I think the ISO of the D200 is acceptable for enlargements (8x10's) up to about ISO 640 or 800. I'm very picky, you might find higher ISO settings work fine for your needs, especially if you are not making larger prints. Experiment! remember to change your ISO back to a lower setting when you're done with your low light pictures.

2. Take your camera off the fully automatic "P" mode (where the camera makes all the decisions), and change your shutter speed to a slower speed. The slower shutter speed lets more light into the camera, because the 'eye' (the shutter) is open longer. (Use the "S" mode where you set the shutter speed and the camera selects an appropriate aperature). HOWEVER, there is a trade-off again. The slower your shutter speed the more likely you are to have blurred pictures; your subject will move or your camera will shake. If you're taking pictures of a stationary object or an adult, you can tell the person to sit very still and experiment! As for reducing camera shake, first and foremost, learn to hold the camera properly. I can't stress this enough...it's the biggest reason for blurred photos that I see. learn/practice squeezing the shutter realease, not stabbing it. Then, invest in a lens with the Vibration Reduction feature.


3. Take your camera off of the fully automatic "P" mode and change your aperature. (If you like, you can use the "A" mode where you set the aperature and the camera selects the shutter speed for you). The aperature is how wide open the shutter "eye" opens with each picture. Think of your own eye. In bright sunlight, your pupils close down to small openings, as there is a lot of light available. If you are in a dark room, your pupils open as wide as possible to let as much light into your eye as possible. That's the same way a camera works. So, if you are in a darker room, you need to let more light into the camera...that means a larger aperature. The tricky part to remember is that the LARGEST aperature has the smallest number. That means a 3.5 aperature is a larger opening than an aperature of 16. HOWEVER, once again there is a trade-off, as a larger aperature means you have a smaller depth-of-field; depth of field means the area of your picture that is in focus. I'm sure you've seen landscape photos, where every detail is in sharp focus, the far away mountains and clouds, as well as small rocks and grass or a steam in the forground. That is created by a small aperature with a wide/deep depth of field. Then think of a portrait in a magazine or taken by a studio, where the person is in focus, but the background fades off into a pleasing blur. That's done with a large aperature and a narrow/shallow depth of field.

NOTE: The widest aperature available is determined by your lens, so you can't use all the aperature settings with every lens. Your camera knows this and will only adjust to whatever your lens has available. That's why you might have different settings available with different lenses. Experiment!!

OK, sorry if that was long-winded, but the D-200 is a great camera, yours is operating properly, and I want you to enjoy using it!

Jan 01, 2009 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

My photos are coming out slightly grainy in low light. Have played around with ISO and aperture etc but no luck. All modes have the same problem. Camera= canon powershot S5 I5


When you use auto mode on most point and shoot digital cameras ( which includes the F717) the camera software gets to choose aperature, shutter speed, and ISO setting. When the ISO setting is used at the faster ISOs, the images get digital 'noisy' very quickly. There is a much higher noise level in consumer digicams at the higher ISOs, because the sensor chip is much smaller than in the digital SLRs. F2.0 suggests yoiu are shooting at the maximum aperature of your lens and that the light is pretty dim.
If you learn to use your camera in the Av ( aperature preferred) mode at ISOs of 50 or 100, most of the noise you are describing will disappear. The camera should take very nice images at ISOs less than 200.

Consult your manual on aperature preferred or manul setting of the ISO speed

Nov 20, 2008 | Canon Digital Cameras

1 Answer

New Canon EOS 50D-aperature stays at 0, and won't autofocus.


Send it back ASAP to get the problem corrected in warranty also see if Ritz or another camera store can figure it out before you send it off. Consider getting a warranty from Squaretrade.com within 90 days of your purchase I hope this helps. They also have accidental damage protection too for a reasonable rate.

Oct 22, 2008 | Canon EOS 50D Digital Camera with 28-135mm...

2 Answers

Flashless photograghy


If you set the camera to P (program) the flash will not pop up automatically but the camera will still control the shutter speed and aperature settings automatically. Also with the lens you are using you should probably have a tripod which will help you hold the camera more steady.

Jun 10, 2008 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

2 Answers

External Flash


The aperature error is due to the fact that the lens in not a constant aperature design. The settings on the LCD are assuming you are at full wide angle setting. As this lens moves towards telephoto, the aperature changes about 2/3 of an f-stop due to the mechanical movement of the lens elements. So a manual setting of f4.0 at full telephoto will be more llike f5.0 in reality. It is too bad Epson could not make the mechanical aperature adjust to compensate, but every nice feature costs something. I have not had any issue with the shutter speed changing. One guess is that the camera has shutter speed/aperature combinations that it can't achieve due to mechanical limitations, so it chooses the available combination. Another is that it wasn't in manual mode, but rather aperature priority mode and the final adjustments changed the speed.

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3100Z Digital Camera

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