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I have a HP laserjet P2015 printer. Please could you tell me in what part of the paper container do I put envelopes, to have an address printed on them.

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Laser printers are similar to photocopiersLaser printers are a lot like photocopiers and use the same basic technology. Indeed, as we describe later in this article, the first laser printers were actually built
from modified photocopiers. In a photocopier, a bright light is used to make an exact copy of a printed page. The light reflects off the page onto a light-sensitive drum; static electricity (the effect that makes a balloon stick to your clothes if you rub it a few times) makes ink particles stick to the drum; and the ink is then transferred to paper and "fused" to its surface by hot rollers. A laser printer works in almost exactly the same way, with one important difference: because there is no original page to copy, the laser has to write it out from scratch.
Imagine you're a computer packed full of data. The information you store is in electronic format: each piece of data is stored electronically by a microscopically small switching device called a transistor. The printer's job is to convert this electronic data back into words and pictures: in effect, to turn electricity into ink. With an inkjet printer, it's easy to see how that happens: ink guns, operated electrically, fire precise streams of ink at the page. With a laser printer, things are slightly more complex. The electronic data from your computer is used to control a laser beam-and it's the laser that gets the ink on the page, using static electricity in a similar way to a photocopier.
How a laser printer worksWhen you print something, your computer sends a vast stream of electronic data (typically a few megabytes or million characters) to your laser printer. An electronic circuit in the printer figures out what all this data means and what it needs to look like on the page. It makes a laser beam scan back and forth across a drum inside the printer, building up a pattern of static electricity. The static electricity attracts onto the page a kind of powdered ink called toner. Finally, as in a photocopier, a fuser unit bonds the toner to the paper.
Millions of bytes (characters) ofdata stream into the printer from your computer.An electronic circuit in the printer (effectively, a small computer in its own right) figures out how to print this data so it looks correct on the page.The electronic circuit activates the corona wire. This is a high-voltage wire that gives a static electric charge to anything nearby.The corona wire charges up the photoreceptor drum so the drum gains a positive charge spread uniformly across its surface.At the same time, the circuit activates the laser to make it draw the image of the page onto the drum. The laser beam doesn't actually move: it bounces off a moving mirror that scans it over the drum. Where the laser beam hits the drum, it erases the positive charge that was there and creates an area of negative charge instead. Gradually, an image of the entire page builds up on the drum: where the page should be white, there are areas with a positive charge; where the page should be black, there are areas of negative charge.An ink roller touching the photoreceptor drum coats it with tiny particles of powdered ink (toner). The toner has been given a positive electrical charge, so it sticks to the parts of the photoreceptor drum that have a negative charge (remember that opposite electrical charges attract in the same way that opposite poles of a magnet attract). No ink is attracted to the parts of the drum that have a positive charge. An inked image of the page builds up on the drum.A sheet of paper from a hopper on the other side of the printer feeds up toward the drum. As it moves along, the paper is given a strong positive electrical charge by another corona wire.When the paper moves near the drum, its positive charge attracts the negatively charged toner particles away from the drum. The image is transferred from the drum onto the paper but, for the moment, the toner particles are just resting lightly on the paper's surface.The inked paper passes through two hot rollers (the fuser unit). The heat and pressure from the rollers fuse the toner particles permanently into the fibers of the paper.The printout emerges from the side of the copier. Thanks to the fuser unit, the paper is still warm. It's literally hot off the press!Who invented laser printers?Until the early 1980s, hardly anyone had a personal or office computer; the few people who did made "hardcopies" (printouts) with dot-matrix printers. These relatively slow machines made a characteristically horrible screeching noise because they used a grid of tiny metal needles, pressed against an inked ribbon, to form the shapes of letters, numbers, and symbols on the page. They printed each character individually, line by line, at a typical speed of about 80 characters (one line of text) per second, so a page would take about a minute to print. Although that sounds slow compared to modern laser printers, it was a lot faster than most people could bash out letters and reports with an old-style typewriter (the mechanical or electric keyboard-operated printing machines that were used in offices for writing letters before affordable computers made them obsolete). You still occasionally see bills and address labels printed by dot-matrix; you can always tell because the print is relatively crude and made up of very visible dots. In the mid-1980s, as computers became more popular with small businesses, people wanted machines that could produce letters and reports as quickly as dot-matrix printers but with the same kind of print quality they could get from old-fashioned typewriters. The door was open for laser printers!
Fortunately, laser-printing technology was already on the way. The first laser printers had been developed in the late 1960s byGary Starkweather of Xerox, who based his work on the photocopiers that had made Xerox such a successful corporation. By the mid-1970s, Xerox was producing a commercial laser printer-a modified photocopier with images drawn by a laser-called the Dover, which could knock off about 60 pages a minute (one per second) and sold for the stupendous sum of $300,000. By the late 1970s, big computer companies, including IBM, Hewlett-Packard, and Canon, were competing to develop affordable laser printers, though the machines they came up with were roughly 2-3 times bigger than modern ones-about the same size as very large photocopiers.
Two machines were responsible for making laser printers into mass-market items. One was the LaserJet, released by Hewlett-Packard (HP) in 1984 at a relatively affordable $3495. The other, Apple's LaserWriter, originally cost almost twice as much ($6995) when it was launched the following year to accompany the Apple Macintosh computer. Even so, it had a huge impact: the Macintosh was very easy to use and, with relatively inexpensive desktop-publishing software and a laser printer, it meant almost anyone could turn out books, magazines, and anything and everything else you could print onto paper. Xerox might have developed the technology, but it was HP and Apple who sold it to the world!
The first laser printerDipping into the archives of the US Patent and Trademark Office, I've found one of Gary Starkweather's original laser-printer designs, patented on June 7, 1977. To make it easier to follow, I've colored it in and annotated it more simply than the technical drawing in the original patent (if you wish, you can find the full details filed under US Patent 4027961: Copier/Raster Scan Apparatus).
What we have is essentially a laser scanning unit (colored blue) sitting on top of a fairly conventional, large office photocopier (colored red). In Starkweather's design, the laser scanner slides on and off the glass window of the photocopier (the place where you would normally put your documents, face down), so the same machine can be used as either a laser printer or a copier-anticipating all-in-one office machines by about 20-25 years.
How does it work?The laser scanner creates the image.The image is beamed through the glass copier window into the copier mechanism underneath.The image is reflected by a mirror.A lens focuses the image.A second mirror reflects the image again.The image is transferred onto the photocopier belt.A developer unit converts the image into printable form.The printable image is transferred to the paper.The fuser permanently seals the image onto the page, which emerges into the collecting rack at top of the machine.more information :http://best3dprinter4u.com/
Happy working

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Http://h71016.www7.hp.com/html/interactive/lj2015/model.html?jumpid=re_r2515_3d/ProdCat/IPG/VAcontent/BlackWhitePrinters/LaserJetP2015/3D|ProdPage|flash&clang=enna
plz paste the link into your browser and you will find the required information

Posted on Jun 24, 2008

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You must have a record. hp p1006 printer envelopes hang in print que. I have spent many hours with your staff and the problem hasn't been solved?


Envelpopes should be printed using the feed tray located in the front of the printer not through the paper cassette. Try this: Follow these steps to print on envelopes from a computer running Windows. NOTE: For specific details on formatting text for printing on envelopes, consult the help files in the word processing software. For best results, consider using a label for the return address.
  1. Click File , and then click Print . The Print dialog box opens.
  2. Depending on the software program, click Properties , Options , Printer Setup , or Preferences . The printer Properties dialog box opens.
  3. Click the Paper/Quality tab.
  4. Select Envelope as the paper type.
  5. From the Size drop-down list, select the applicable size. To create a custom size envelope, use the following steps:
    1. On the Paper/Quality tab, click Custom .
    2. Click in the Name text box, and then enter a name for the custom envelope size.
    3. Click in the Width text box, and then enter the width. NOTE: Make certain the size is in inches. Click the Use Millimeters/Use Inches button to toggle between using millimeters and inches to define the custom paper size.
    4. Click in the Height text box, and then enter the height.
    5. Click Save .
  6. Click Apply to save the settings.
  7. Click OK to print the envelopes. NOTE: An error message might display asking to load an envelope into the manual feed tray. This might occur even if the envelopes are loaded. Make sure the envelopes are loaded, and then click Continue . The product will continue printing from whichever input tray contains the envelopes.

Dec 17, 2010 | HP LASERJET P1006 Printer

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I replaced a hp laserjet p2015 printer with another hp laserjet p2015 printer but it can't print.what's the problem,pls help me



This HP printer is comes with the USB cable. To install the printer software, you need to install the USB driver compatible to your printer and then it will ready to print.

Dec 08, 2010 | HP LaserJet P2015 Printer

1 Answer

What is the maximum weight of paper can you put in the printer?


Plain paper (60 to 90 g/m2), heavy paper (91 to 163 g/m2), envelope
(Envelope DL, Envelope COM10, Envelope C5, Envelope
Monarch, Envelope B5), label sheet, transparency ((Black and white
printing only)

Jun 10, 2010 | HP Color LaserJet 2600n Printer

1 Answer

On anything other than plain printer paper, the ink tends to rub off the printed page - really a problem with labels and envelopes. I have tried changing the printer settings for these items, but it does...


You may need a shop to increase the fuser temperature. You also may just need a new fuser. In printing preferences you need to make sure you're telling the printer you're using envelopes or labels. When the toner rubs off, the fuser is just not hot enough.

Nov 05, 2009 | HP LaserJet P2015 Printer

2 Answers

I need to know how to print an envelope on and HP color laserjet 4700dn


Select envelope, after you hit print. Run one first on a sheet of regular paper, to see the orientation. Then, just put them in, the way you have it set up for.

Sep 03, 2009 | HP LaserJet color laser printer

1 Answer

I am unable to print an address on an envelope.... it comes out blank


Hello,

It sounds like to paper setting is wrong. In the configuration you can set if the envelope in on the right side, left side or center of the paper feed. If it is set one way and you feed the envelope the other way the printer will print but on the wrong end of the feed area so nothing will be on the envelope. Try this, print an address label as you would on the envelope but just use a full sheet of paper. If it prints where you can see it, then feed the envelope on that side, or change the feed settings in your software to print on the other side. Office and most other programs have this setting. In MS word the orientation setting is on the envelope and label screen on the right side of the pop up box.

I hope this helps, if so please rate my solution.

Buddy
Corporate Computer
www.ccl-la.com

Jul 03, 2009 | HP LaserJet 1020 Printer

1 Answer

HOW to Print an envelope


The info would come from the PC or laptop on which the printer has been installed. So type your info down on any document in the PC. Place an envelope in the paper tray (usually the manual feed is used for printing on envelopes) and click on print on the PC.

Nov 23, 2008 | HP LaserJet 1018 Printer

1 Answer

My HP LaserJet 4200 prints fine from tray 2, but will NOT print envelopes from tray 1. It WILL print on regular paper from tray 1, but will not print envelopes. What gives? I've already rebooted the


Are there settings on the control panel of your printer?
Is the tray 1 the MP tray? (The one that flips towards you)
If so, can you change the settings of the Tray 1 to Envelope on the control panel?

I hope this helps.

Aug 08, 2008 | HP LaserJet 4200 Printer

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