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HD 1080p TV

I recently bought a 1080p HD tv and while i do not have a hd reciever and blue ray player yet I intend on getting one I am looking for info on what cables I should use and the pros and cons for regular RCA cables(red,yellow,white) and componet cables. How are they different and why I should use what to get the best picture. Also componet cables carry only video so does that mean I also need audio cables (red and white) to carry noise? I want the best picture seeing as how I spent all this money on a HD TV. Reall quite confused about it all.

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Hey peterman,

Depending on the TV model that you purchased, you may have four to five different options that you can use to make the necessary connections for your home theater: composite, component, S-video, DVI and HDMI cabling.

Composite cabling may often be considered to be the "lowest quality" type of cable that you can use to connect two devices in your home theater, and generally consists of three color-coded cables: one yellow, one red and one white. While the yellow cable is typically used to transmit the video signal to your TV, the red and white cables transmit the right and left audio channels respectively. Composite video is somewhat limited in the fact that it is primarily intended for use with analog TV sets - by using composite cabling you may limit the quality of picture your HDTV is able to display.

Analog component cabling then can be viewed as a “step up” from composite cabling. Rather than transmitting video information over a single cable, component cabling instead uses three. Each of these cables transmits a different portion of a video image, and can often be found in bundles with one red, one green and one blue cable. Please keep in mind that component cabling still requires the use of a secondary cable to carry an audio signal, which may need to be purchased separately.

The primary benefit of using component over composite cabling is that many users may report a cleaner, more brilliant image on their TV as a result. This is not a guarantee however, as picture quality is often based as much on personal preference as it is the actual configuration and settings of the equipment used.

Often considered “in-between” composite and component cabling is S-video. Like component video, S-video cables split the information sent to your TV into multiple analog signals…two signals, to be precise. Unlike component video however, these two separate signals are sent using the same cable. Again, when using this type of connection a separate cable for audio signals is necessary.

DVI cabling is the first truly digital option available to most consumers. While it only carries a video signal (like its analog counterparts), DVI cabling can frequently be found connecting computers to monitors or digital projectors. These types of cables will have a unique shape that prevents them from being used as anything other than a video connection, and were designed to optimize signals transmitted from external devices to a visual display.

HDMI on the other hand, is another widely available digital alternative. Unlike DVI, HDMI cables support both video and audio signals, allowing consumers to avoid the proverbial “rat’s nest” behind a home theater system that one might encounter when using multiple cables.

Because HDMI cabling was developed to be backwards compatible with DVI, HDMI and DVI connections may often be able to be used interchangeably using special adaptors. Essentially, if your HD receiver/Blu-ray player only has DVI outputs and your HDTV only has HDMI inputs, you may still be able to connect those devices to your HDTV using the proper accessories.

While some major retailers may recommend using HDMI cables first and foremost over the other alternatives, this does not necessarily always make them the best choice to use. The quality of an image displayed on an HDTV will always be dependent as much on the TV itself, as it is on personal preference and other external devices. Yes, the type of cables used does play a part, but they should never be treated as the only factor to consider when setting up your home theater.

Should you have any questions or lingering doubts, I would strongly suggest speaking with a Magnolia Home Theater agent at your local Best Buy™ store for more information. Most stores will have similar TV's on display using more than one type of connection, and sales associates are always able to provide additional suggestions if desired.

Hope this helps you out.

Sincerely,
Aaron
Go Ahead. Use Us.

Posted on Jun 24, 2008

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