Question about MP3 & Digital Media Players

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MP3 Player not playing the music

Hi - this is my first mp3 player and I'm not sure if I'm doing this right, but I load the songs from a cd into windows media player and then sync the songs I want into my mp3 player. Nothing plays when its done syncing. I bought this on ebay and it measures about 1 1/2" X 1" and when I plug it into the computer, the hardware says it is AMT (automatic music transformer). This device is 2 GB and came from Hong Kong.

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  • bcgunh Dec 26, 2008

    I am having the same problem this is so frusterating!!!

  • Anonymous Dec 29, 2008

    Same thing happens to me!

  • Anonymous Jan 07, 2009

    i have the same problem and none of these answers help me. maybe im just too computer illiterate.

  • Anonymous Feb 24, 2009

    I HAVE THE SAME ******* ONE LOL **** OF ****

  • Anonymous May 04, 2009

    when i connect my mp3 and i load it with songs but when i plug it from the comp and play it no songs are there

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6 Answers

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Hi,
Follow These Steps:
1. Switch OFF your MP3 player 2. Unplug the cable from Computer 3. HOLD "PLAY" button WHILE you PLUGIN the CABLE with MP3 player.
The MP3 player will now reboot, you can see the welcome screen after few seconds.
4. Go to My Computer > Select the MP3 drive > Right Click > FORMAT > File Format : FAT32 > 
After format completes, Unplug the Cable from Computer. Wait few seconds.
5. Plugin the cable with MP3 player.
6. Go to My Computer.
You can now see the MP3 player drive. You can copy paste the media files into the drive. After you complete the file transfers, you can unplug the cable from PC and listen to the songs asusual :)

I've bought the same mp3 player and its working great !

Posted on Apr 08, 2009

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So, you can disable the amt from the device and then it will be seen by the OS as an plain pen drive, then you can copy the mp3's directly into it. AMT isn't a good tool but for information I will tell you the pen drive you bought uses a sigmatel chipset(35xx), same as i-pod shuffle.(Maybe you will notice that listening mp3's at 0.05% distortion rate, far lower than te minnimum distortion apreciated by the human.

Posted on Jul 10, 2008

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WELL, next time dont be cheap and buy a bunch of crapy mp3s off of ebay!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
DEAL WITH YOUR PROBLEMS YOUR SELF!!!!!!!!!!

Posted on Jun 23, 2008

I just bought the same type of MP3 player with AMT software built in. At first I thought it was some spyware, but it seems safe. All I do is select the songs from my PC (mp3, wma or any other format) and I noticed that when I clicked send to the MP3 the software overided the usual copying window in XP. I say 2 thumbs up.

Posted on Oct 02, 2008

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Connect u r player->AMT will popup->right click on ur player->go to Properties->go to hardwares->click on the cd room icon against which something like"AMT MP3 USB Device" is written->click the properties->click disable->disconnect ur player->reconnect it. now AMT Will not pop up.

another thing is the cd frm which u r coppyng songs may hav songs in audio format.so first convert it to mp3 format n then copy it in ur player.

Posted on Aug 28, 2009

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Geez... all you have to do is just allow the AMT integrate with your PC... if the antivirus detect is as a virus just put the file into exclusion list... no problem with me (using kaspersky int security) and this MP3 player is NOT crappy, last long than the one with the LCD, cause the LCD eating the battery power... and of course... it's easy to carry...

Posted on Aug 05, 2009

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I want to burn songs from my cd's to my mp3 player. I don't know how to load them on my computer. How do I load my cd's on my computer and then load them onto my mp3? I have Roxio Easy Media Creator 8 and...


First you need to convert the songs on the CD into mp3 music files then you copy these mp3 files to your mp3 player.
There are several freeware rip programs on the Internet that rip CD songs into mp3 files.
Do a Google search for these rip programs and install the program on your computer.
You can use Windows Media Player, it can rip music CDs and convert the music files into mp3 music files.

Mar 29, 2010 | SanDisk Sansa Fuze MP3 Player

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Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part II by Tha Mp3 Doctor WMA files are...


Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part II
by Tha Mp3 Doctor

WMA files are special. There are two types of WMA file, and the Mp3 or digital Audio Player documentation will not always tell which of these two types the Mp3 player will recognize. Type I is a non-licensed, or non-DRM-protected WMA file. DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is Microsoft’s copyright system for music files. If you have a type of Mp3 player that will only accept non-DRM protected files, the product specs for your player will NOT mention the words "DRM" or "Windows Plays ForSure" on them (unless they are using it in the negative, such as "this player does NOT support DRM encryption"). In MOST cases (there are more and more exceptions), Windows Media Player will convert songs from CD’s that you personally bought from the store into non-DRM encrypted WMA format.

The second type of WMA file is a DRM-encrypted WMA file, and there are several subtypes of these. Every DRM-encrypted file can have "play rights," "burn rights," and "transfer rights." "Play rights" mean you can play the song on your computer, "burn rights" mean you can burn the song to CD, and "transfer rights" mean you can transfer the song to your Mp3 player. Once again, not all WMA files are created equal. If you have a BASIC subscription to a music service such as Napster, you may download songs that have "play rights" – you can play them on your computer without any problem; but they may lack burn rights and transfer rights – so you cannot burn them to CD, or transfer them to your Mp3 player without incident. The solution here is to upgrade your music service to the premium, more expensive subscription that includes burn rights and transfer rights.

Then there are "fixed-term" licenses and "unlimited" licenses on WMA files. A fixed-term license will expire after so many days, months, or years; and will require you to resynchronize your songs to the music service or to your computer in order to continue playing them. This is a key reason behind songs "disappearing." Napster and Rhapsody are two examples of music services with fixed-term licenses. You must resynchronize your Mp3 player to your computer every 30 days, and you must keep you music service subscription active. If you let your subscription lapse, then the songs that were once working will no longer be playable. Once again, the only remedies are to renew your music service subscription (legal), convert those songs into a different format that the Mp3 player will recognize (possibly illegal), or to use DRM-removal software (illegal and unreliable).

One word needs to be said about burning your own personal CD’s and transferring them to the Mp3 player. CD’s naturally put song files into CDA format. Most Mp3 players do not recognize CDA format. So you will have to use Windows Media Player (easiest, IMO) or some other software to convert the CDA files into Mp3, WMA, or some other format that your Mp3 player recognizes, BEFORE you can transfer them to the Mp3 player.

Real Audio files also have an encryption system, and may not work with most Mp3 players – check your product documentation.

Audiobooks are in their own format and bring their own special problems which fall outside the scope of this article.

There are a ton of music services out there. iTunes uses AAC format. Napster, Rhapsody, Bearshare, Spiral Frog, and many others use DRM-protected WMA format nowadays. Limewire and Morpheus generally use Mp3 or non-DRM-encrypted files. Double check the formats that your player will support BEFORE choosing a music service. Conversely, if you already have a music service, choose an mp3 player that’s right for your particular service. Note: most store workers do not have the faintest idea of what I have been discussing in this article, so don’t trust their judgment – educate yourself first.

AS A GENERAL RULE OF THUMB (as always, there are exceptions), all Mp3 players recognize the Mp3 file format. The Mp3 file format is the least problematic of all the file formats. It takes up less space on your Mp3 player than most file formats – so you can load more songs onto your player than if you were using other formats. So, if you download all of your songs into Mp3 format, or tell Windows Media Player to convert your own CD’s into Mp3 format, then you will rarely go wrong.

on Jun 09, 2008 | iRiver H340 MP3 Player

1 Answer

I sync with my mp3 player on computer it loads then i press play on mp3 player no music but vol is on i save my music from cd straight to windows media player then sync with mp3 player


if its right you just copy the shortcut of the music from your cd to your windows media player, meaning you cannot play that song in the media player if the cd is not inserted, you have to rip first the cd to your pc then put it in your mp3. Also make sure that you rip it in the right format that your mp3 can play, media player automatically rip the music as wma not mp3, make sure your mp3 player can play wma.

Sep 28, 2009 | MP3 & Digital Media Players

2 Answers

"No Song" displayed even though music has been loaded, many times


The songs ripped from CD are not in the right format. In Windows Media Player, highlight the Rip tab, click the black arrow under the Rip tab, select Rip Options --> Format --> Mp3. Now, re-rip the songs. Before you transfer these tracks to the player, make sure you delete the tracks that are on the mp3 player now, or else Windows Media Player wil ltell you that the tracks are already there. Now, transfer the newly-ripped Mp3 tracks to your Sansa. Should be good to go.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Jan 10, 2009 | SanDisk Sansa Clip MP3 Player

1 Answer

Wont copy songs to mp3 player because of write protection


To adjust the copy protection setting on your ripped music files,
  1. Open the Tools tab at the top of your Windows Media Player.
  2. Select Options and then select the Rip Music tab.
  3. Under this menu, you will be able to choose the type of music file as well as the quality with which you would like to save the music.
  4. Make sure the box next to Copy protect music is left unchecked.
Your GPX player has the ability to play music files in both the MP3 and WMA format. Make sure to use MTP when transferring copy-protected WMA files.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Nov 04, 2008 | GPX MW3836 MP3 Player

1 Answer

MY SANSA WONT SYNC SONGS..


The songs are in the wrong format - they need to be stripped of their DRM license (illegal) or converted to mp3 format.  The best, most legal way to do this is to redownload the songs as an Mp3 file, or re-rip your CD's in Windows Media Player in Mp3 format.
these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 12, 2008 | SanDisk Sansa e260 MP3 Player

1 Answer

Device is operating slowly, reset...


Make sure the device is fully charged. Make sure the songs are in the correct format - Mp3 is best; iTunes/AAC will not work; check the bit rate of the songs to make sure they are at acceptable levels.
Also, make sure you are using the Media Manager to convert files. Formatting the player, in this case, might have been a bad idea, b/c it is possible that it erased key system files - I do not see where Sony has the original firmware/software for this particular product on their website, so it is going to be difficult to reload it if that is the case.
Here is some general info: I have seen quite a few threads in which the stated problem is that the Mp3 or Digital Audio Player will not load the songs; will appear to load the songs but will not actually play them in theMp3 player once disconnected from computer; will skip the songs on the player, or show only “0:00” for file length; songs “disappear” all of a sudden (although this particular problem can be caused for many reasons not covered in this article); your store-bought/burned/ripped CD’s will not load into your Mp3 player; or get the error message “File Format Not Supported.” 
All of these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 04, 2008 | Sony NWZ-S615F Walkman Video MP3 Player

1 Answer

Playing music after I synch it from my library in media player


The songs are probably not in the right format. See manual/product specs for details on that. Mp3 players are more complicated than ever. This player accepts DRM-encrypted WMA files. I would first check the songs that you have downloaded to make sure they did not have "temporary" licenses with a fixed end date. You can do this by right clicking on an individual song, clicking on properties, and selecting the "license," "digital rights mgmt" or "media usage rights" tab - the wording varies by configuration. It will give you info on the license. If the song does not have transfer rights, you will not be able to transfer those songs - a different music service may be more helpful. If the song says that it has no license, it may not work with this player. One remedy is to use mp3 converter software to convert all of those wma files to Mp3's - I don't know of any free ones, but you can certainly look for free Mp3 Converters.

Apr 28, 2008 | SanDisk Sansa E280 MP3 Player

1 Answer

How do i start?


Hook it to your computer. Go to My Computer and select the external drive device..which is your mp3 player. Then open your music folder on your computer and drag the music to the appropriate folder on your mp3 player. Make sure the extension on the music is .mp3 or it will not play. Once the music is loaded, unhook the mp3 player and you should see your newly loaded songs on the player.

Dec 29, 2007 | iLO (2 GB) MP3 Player

1 Answer

Inability to play recorded songs


maybe the music you are trying to play is protected as many music you buy over the internet is. try loading your player with music you ripped from a cd or make sure the protected music is transfered directly to your player with the program you bought the music with.

Nov 01, 2007 | Philips SA3125\02 MP3 Player

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