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Air conditioning Does the thermostats wiring have a color coding scheme

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No,
most thermostat wiring is 4 core, because installers use phone cable -its cheap- but there is no accepted color code, and some systems use 2, or 3, or 4 of the wires.
there should be a standard.
terminals on thermostats and furnace, aircons are labelled, but the labelling is often contradictory. some thermostats have function to control the fan separately, some for the same aircon dont.
the manufacturers web site for your aircon,
should give a detailed explanation in install instructions which terminals are open on rise close on rise, heat/cool and how they are connected
the new thermostat should detail which of its terminals match those of the aircon.
test the cable before installing anything at the aircon or thermostat, a lightning strike can have shorted things normally impossible, and the lowV thermostat line could be at lineV and trash anything or anyone connected to it,

  • Lightning strikes are very unforgiving, please be careful, even if the lightning touched down yards away the voltage at large distances from the strike can be 10KV
  • paranoia impels me to recommend an electrician with test equipment for the lines, outside unit, cables and inside units, its better to check and be wrong, than not check and be wrong.

Posted on Jun 23, 2008

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How to connect to my Air conditioner AZ28E15DABm1 GE a thermostat model TR400 HC-A SECO?


Hello,

carefully follow the below steps;

Turn off the circuit breaker that controls the air conditioning system. Turn the thermostat to the "On" position to make sure that all power is cut off and the air conditioner cannot accidentally operate.
Remove the cover of the existing thermostat and remove the colored wires from the terminals. Take out any screws that secure the thermostat to the wall, and remove the thermostat.

Mount the new thermostat on the wall. Feed the wires through the unit, with enough slack to allow you to make the new connections.

Connect the red wire to the thermostat terminal labeled "RH," "RC" or "R." The red wire carries the power from the transformer.
Connect the green wire to the thermostat terminal labeled "G." This controls the relay that controls the fan. Attach the yellow wire to the "Y" terminal of the thermostat. This powers the main control. Connect the white wire to the "W" terminal. This is the heating control wire.

Close the thermostat's cover and turn the breakers back on. Turn the new thermostat to the "On" position to test it and that would be all.

I hope the above helps. If it is not helpful, please let me know so that I may direct you further.....

Good luck.

Feb 25, 2011 | GE Zoneline AZ38H12DAD Split System Air...

Tip

Thermostat wiring terminals and colors


R - The R terminal is the power for the thermostat. This comes from the transformer usually located in the blower section for split systems but you may find the transformer in the condensing unit. For this reason, it is a good idea to kill the power at the condensing unit and the blower section before changing or working on the wiring at the thermostat. If you have a package unit then the transformer is in the package unit.
Red for the R terminal.

RC - The RC terminal is designated for the power for cooling. Some HVAC systems use two transformers. A transformer for cooling and a transformer for heating. In this case the power from the transformer in the blower section would go to the thermostat terminal. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.
Red for RC terminal.

RH - The RH terminal is designated for the power for heating. See RC above for an explanation. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.

Y - This is the terminal for cooling or air conditioning and goes to the compressor relay. Typically a thermostat wire pull is made to the air handler on split systems and then this wire is spliced for the separate wire pull which is made to the condenser. Some manufacturers put a terminal board strip near the control board in the air handler so a splice is not needed.
Yellow for Y Terminal.

Y2 - This is the thermostat terminal for cooling second stage if your system is so equipped. Many systems only have a single compressor but if you have two compressors which should only operate off of one thermostat then you need the Y2 thermostat terminal for second stage cooling.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is light blue but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use. Most installers use the color coding as noted but be aware that some do not use the thermostat color coding.

W - This is the thermostat terminal for heating. This wire should go directly to the heating source whether it be a gas or oil furnace, electric furnace, or boiler,
White for W Terminal.

W2 - This is the thermostat terminal used for second stage heat. There are gas furnaces with low fire and high fire and some depend on control from a two-stage heating thermostat with a W2 terminal. Heat Pumps use staging for auxiliary heat and need a W2 terminal.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is brown but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use.

G - This is the thermostat terminal used for the fan relay to energize the indoor blower fan. On a split system the blower fan is in the blower section while with a package unit the blower fan is in the outdoor package unit.

Green for G Terminal.

C - This is the thermostat terminal which originates from the transformer and is necessary to complete the 24 volts power circuit in the thermostat but only if the thermostat consumes electricity for power. Many digital thermostats require 24 volts for power so the common wire is necessary.
C stands for common and there is no universal color used for this terminal although black is the most common color I've seen.

O or B - These thermostat terminals are for heat pumps and the B thermostat terminal is used on for Rheem or Ruud and any manufacturer that energizes the reversing valve in heating mode for the heat pump. Most other manufacturers of heat pumps will utilize the reversing valve for cooling and the O thermostat terminal will be utilized for this purpose. This wire goes to outside heat pump condenser where the reversing valve is located.

Orange for O and Dark Blue for B depending on the installer of the heat pump and the manufacturer. If you have a Trane, Carrier, Goodman, Lennox, Ducane, Heil, Fedders, Amana, Janitrol, or any other manufacturer other than Rheem or Ruud you will be utilizing the orange wire for reversing valve. Rheem and Ruud will usually utilize the blue wire for reversing valve.

E - This thermostat terminal is for heat pumps and stands for Emergency Heating. If for whatever reason the heat pump condenser fails and it is necessary to run the heat there is an option on heat pump thermostats for emergency heating. Basically this simply utilizes the back-up heat source many heat pumps have to heat the home without sending a signal to the condenser to run for heat.

E - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the E terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

X or Aux - This thermostat terminal is for back-up on a heat pump and allows for auxiliary heating from the back-up heat source usually located in the air handler.

X or Aux - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the Aux terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

S1 & S2 or Outdoor 1 and Outdoor 2 - Some thermostats have this terminal and it used for an outdoor temperature sensor. The wire uses for this should be special shielded wire and completely separate form the other thermostat wires.







on Jun 06, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

I am repairing my home ac thermostat and need one with a color scheme for 7 wire colors


if you go to the air handler that you have and follow the thermostat wires to the control board they should match up to your thermostat

Jun 24, 2010 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

When out temp is below 50, heater does not produce enough heat


Sounds to me like the thermostat or thermostat wires are wrong.
If you open the t-stat make sure no bare wires are touching one another.
Typical wire codes/colors are red to R,green to G,yellow to Y,w to white or w1,orange to O,blue to common(C),brow to E.
These should be the same in the air handler as well as the outside condensing unit.
Some installer may use different colors for some other reason.
Verify these colors throughout and report back.
Has the problem existed for the 2.5 years or is it recent?

Feb 18, 2010 | Ruud Central System Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Heat not blowing on heat cycle


Have to know what kind of heat it is, Gas, Electric or Electric Heat Pump.

Heat pumps, when air over air type, have an extra setting on the thermostat labeled Emergency Heat, Although these thermostats can work on the other types of heating as well.

Both modern Gas and electric furnaces have the blower controlled by a blower board. The flame and or heating elements can also be controlled by the same or a separate board. SO you could have a board problem, or a safety switch or other symptom causing a safety switch to trip off on you.

Consult with your diagram and find something you can recognize then trace the wires down and follow to where you get the power to turn on the heat (usually always R feeds thermostat and W feeds Heat). Colors of the attached wires means nothing at this point. Look for the terminal designations not colors.

Hope this helps you. Please grade me accordingly and GOOD LUCK. :)

Mar 03, 2009 | Ruud Central System Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Replace thermostat


Typical color codes in Florida are;
white to W1 for heat
yellow to Y for compressor
red to R-RC-RH for power in
brown to W2 and or emergency /auxillary heat
green to G or Fan
orange to reversing valve(o/b)
blue to common.
You can open the control panel on the unit to verify these colors and components.

Feb 21, 2009 | Carrier Air Conditioners

1 Answer

I have amanual honey well and I want to change it to a programable honeywell but the two wires on the manual thermostat are not labeled, so I don't know where to connect the wires to in the new thermostat


Wires for thermostat control circuits are normally color coded. Check for proper connections at the furnace and connect the same colored wires that you find at the furnace to the like lettered terminals on the new thermostat. R to R, W to W , Y to Y , ans G to G. R is for power to the thermostat, W is for heating, Y is for cooling and G is for furnace fan operation.

Nov 14, 2008 | Honeywell Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Rv domatic a/c and heater


Need to know what your air conditioner make & model is. Are you running air conditioner & furnace off same thermostat, or are they on separate ones?

Jul 26, 2008 | Dometic Rooftop RV Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Rv air conditioning


You may have to remove your filter & look for a model # of your unit, so we can pinpoint your wiring to the thermostat. Usually the terminals on the thermostats are labeled -RC-RH- etc, and you simply move old to new of the same. A lot of times some manufacturers will use phone cable form AC unit to thermostat, and mix up the colors, that's the reason for going to the AC and see what color is used from there. It could be red from control box, connected to green wire to thermostat for example. Thats where you note it and wire accordingly.(terminal calling for red wire, would now be green) If your stumped, get back to us with that model#.

Jul 12, 2008 | Dometic Rooftop RV Air Conditioner

2 Answers

Air Conditioner malfunction


Hi, Sounds like you have a short in the control circuit to me. Turn off all power going to the unit. Write down or otherwise mark the wires leaving the control board going to the thermostat. Remove them from the control board. Replace the fuse. Turn power back on and see if the fan still runs. If it does, check and or replace the heat limit switch that brings the fan on during the heat cycle. It may just need adjusted. If the fuse blows, I would think that the control board is probably bad. If it doesn't blow, Remove the thermostat. Leaving all thermostat wires open check them with an Ohm meter. There should be no continuity between them. Twist all the wires together at one end and ohm them again at the other end. You should have complete continuity on all wires. If the wiring checks out, down power the unit. Double check your wire colors and rewire the control board. With all wires open at the thermostat, turn the power back on. Touch the RED wire to the YELLOW wire. The Condensing unit should come on. Touch the RED wire to the GREEN wire. The fan should come on. Touch the RED wire to the WHITE wire. The heat should come on. Down power the unit. Replace the thermostat. Test unit. If the fuse has lasted ok but blows now it is either wired wrong at the Thermostat or the thermostat is bad. I hope I have helped. NOTE: If you can not understand these instructions. Call a licensed Heating / Air conditioning company. kstfas

Sep 23, 2007 | Air Conditioners

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