Question about LG DLE3733 Electric Dryer

2 Answers

My LG DLE3733 is not drying well. I just replaced the vent hose (old one was slightly crushed). Used semi-rigid aluminum 4" duct...3 90-degree turns, total of 7 ft before louvers...well within limits in manual. Any ideas?

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  • captainjj1 Nov 16, 2010

    Thanks, Joe. In an ideal world, I would love to bolt the thing to an outside wall and blow

    the exhaust straight out...12 inches. Unfortunately, I can't. The dryer is stacked on top

    of an LG washer. The pair are pushed up against a wall and I need to make the first 90

    to get the pair in as far as possible. Even so, they stick out from the counter (to the left

    of them) by about 7", which Mama hates. Then a gentle 45 down and a straight shot of

    about 2 feet to another 90, then thru the hole in the outside wall on the right side of the

    pair. Just outside the house, another 90 so it doesn't vent into the cooling fins on my

    heat pump (18" away) and a 2 foot smooth duct run to the exhaust louvers. This is the

    same setup we've had for the past 2-1/2 years. While the dryer's never been great, it's

    become ridiculous now. One beach towel, on highest temp setting is still not dry after

    55 minutes! We just retiled the floor a month ago and reinstalled everything. Wife

    wanted to push it back more, I cautioned against it, she won, I was right. Before, the

    flex duct was "strectched" thus making it smoother on the inside. The new stuff is not

    stretched at all. I know, I know...it should be smooth. But this doesn't seem a good

    enough explanation for the dramatic change in drying (or "not drying"). Here are a few

    current facts:
    ** Heating elements get real hot (ran it empty for 5 minutes and the grate on inside back,

    where hot air enters, burned my fingers).
    ** Airflow thru the louvers at the outside seems reasonable
    ** However, the lint screen on the inside has never trapped tons of lint (yes, I should have

    taken this up with LG two yeasrs ago).
    Still, something has changed since we reinstalled after the tile job. Ducting is better, so

    I'm at a loss.

    Also, the whole thing is difficult to work on, as it's in a confined space (only about 11" on

    right side and against a counter/base unit on the left).

    I'm a do-it-yourselfer and have repaired conventional (non-stacked) dryers before

    (Whirlpool, I think).

    Whadaya think? Still ducting?

    Jon

  • captainjj1 Nov 19, 2010

    11/19/10, c. 1032am
    Thanks, Seth. I think you may be on to something with your internal blockage idea. Last "expert" basically said "too many 90s, change ducting to multiple 45s" But I don't have room for that, plus it ignores the fact that something has changed since we retiled the floor and reinstalled the dryer about a month ago (when the problem really started). I sent a lengthy post back at him, but no response in 3 days.
    The dryer is stacked on an LG washer and both fit into a nook about 39" wide. Left side is sink base unit and counter, right side is exterior wall (drywall, 1" foam insul, concrete block). Vent hole to outside is about 12" off floor. Problem is: it vents right into new heat pump unit (18" away), so I HAVE TO take the dryer exhaust away, so as not to clog cooling fins on heat pump. Obviously, access is a problem for working on it (I'm 63, with back problems, but...I'm a good do-it-yourselfer and have repaired conventional home dryers before).
    All ducting is new, as of a week ago. Most is unstretched, semi-rigid aluminum 4" duct. The last 2 ft are smooth, rigid aluminum. The washer/dryer stack is pushed up against a wall and I need to make the first 90 to get them in as far as possible. Even so, they stick out from the counter by about 7", which wife hates. Then a gentle 45 down and a straight shot of about 2 feet to another 90, then thru the hole in the outside wall. Just outside the house, another 90 so it doesn't vent into

    the heat pump, then a 2 foot smooth duct run to the exhaust louvers. This is the same setup we've had for the past 2-1/2 years (actually, the last 2 ft used to be 6 feet). While the dryer's never been great, it's become ridiculous now. One beach towel, on highest temp setting is still not dry after 55 minutes!
    Here are a few current facts:
    ** Heating elements get real hot (ran it empty for 5 minutes and the grate where hot air enters the drum burned my fingers).
    ** Airflow thru the louvers at the outside seems reasonable (blows them all open)
    ** However, the lint screen on the inside has never trapped tons of lint (yes, I should have taken this up with LG two years ago).
    Still, something has changed since we reinstalled after the tile job. Ducting is better, so I'm at a loss.
    You hinted at lint buildup on inside (blower wheel), I think. How do I get at that? Can I do it w/o access to the back (trying to move the two out is a real pain)? Can I do it w/o taking the dryer off the washer? Thanks.
    Jon

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The most common probelm is air flow restiction can be from the ducting on the inside of the hose to the outside or with the internal blower wheel are and lint filter catch.when your unit is running go to the outside of your home and feel how much air is coming out if the duct it should be quite a bit if you have louvers on the exterior the air flow should be enough to open all the louvers.If you don not fell alot of air then you have restriction some where in the main line.

If you have or can get a leaf blower then you can use it on the inside of the house put the tube in the venting and turn it on make sure to check the out side so that anything in the venting can come out easy this should help clean out your ducting and hopefully solve your drying issue.

Posted on Nov 17, 2010

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Hello captain. The problem is exactly as you have identified, those three 90 degree turns. Even though they are within the limits. Begin by inspecting the inside of the machine itself where the vent pipe attaches. Use a flashlight and clean all of the inside vent with some steel wool to reduce drag. Now regarding the 7 feet of ductwork. If you can change any of those 90 degree elbows to two 45 degree elbows in succession, you will improve the air flow. If you can make them all 45 degree ells you will see a marked improvement. Joe

Posted on Nov 16, 2010

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1 Answer

Keep getting warning "check exhaust" on a new gas dryer. All exhaust is clear. What's going on?


The CHECK VENT duct blockage sensing system detects and alerts you to blockages in the duct work that reduce exhaust flow from the dryer. This light does not indicate any problems with your dryer. If this light blinks, it indicates that your home's exhaust system/duct work has a serious restriction

Every time the dryer is turned on, the CHECK FILTER LIGHT WILL BLINK, as a reminder to make sure the filter is clean. Always make sure the lint filter is clean before starting a new load; a clogged lint filter will increase drying times.

The Kenmore Elite dryer has a sensor that detects poor exhaust venting, and when it does, a light flashes on the control panel. This warning light does not include a mechanism to stop gas flow, but if it is allowed to flash for an extended period, poor venting may cause the dryer to overheat. As a result, a fuse might blow and disable the gas valve or ignitor. You can prevent this by diagnosing the reason for the flashing indicator light as soon as possible.

In many cases, LINT has built up somewhere in the exhaust pipes.

Check under the lint filter. Pull it out,look inside the slot it fits in, and clear all lint from this area.

Is it possible you have used the WRONG VENT MATERIAL?
Check your vent to make sure it is 4 inch rigid or semi-rigid metal ducting. If your venting is plastic or flexible foil, replace it before using the dryer.

Check your vent hood outside. You may have a restricted or damaged vent hood. It must be clean and free of lint buildup. Check the damper and make sure it opens fully and easily and is free of lint.

I know you said you have no elbows, but I have posted the pipe run lengths with and without elbows. Keep in mind this is with 4 inch rigid or semi rigid metal ducting.

Measure the length of your exhaust system and count the elbows. Use the chart below to see if your duct is too long. If it is too long, have the duct routed to another location that is within the venting guidelines.

0~90 degree elbows=65 ft of 4 inch rigid metal duct.
1~90 degree elbow=55 ft of 4 inch rigid metal duct.
2~90 degree elbows=47 ft """"""""
3~90 degree elbows=36 ft """"""""
4~90 degree elbows=28 ft """"""""

You should always use duct tape or metal tape on all joints, NEVER USE SCREWS, as screws capture lint inside the pipe.

One more note. Lots of people overlook the fact that fabric softeners can build up on the lint filter over time. This buildup can restrict the airflow through the filter reducing dryer efficiency and lengthening drying times. After removing lint, if the filter looks dark or dirty when held up to the light, follow these steps to clean:

Use hot soapy water and a stiff brush to clean
the filter.
Make sure the filter is completely dry before
reinstalling it and using the dryer.
NEVER operate the dryer with a wet lint filter.

Oct 29, 2014 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

While drying water puddles from underneath the dryer and also drips from the control knobs.


If your dryer is leaking water, then you have a serious clog in the exhaust vent ducting somewhere. The water comes from condensation inside the dryer exhaust. As your clothes dry, warm moist air is exhausted out the dryer exhaust vent ducting. If you have any kinks, excessive bends, sags, or excessively long ducting runs, they can create choke points for lint to accumulate. Once the lint accumulates, it begins to collect moisture. As it collects moisture, it will act as a sponge and collect more lint until the dryer becomes completely clogged. Left in a clogged state, the dryer begins to overheat and dries less efficiently. You may notice longer dry times or an excessively hot dryer. Eventually the dryer heating circuits will fail. This can also become a fire hazard if the lint becoimes so backed up that it begins to collect on, or near, the heating element.

If you have not checked the dryer ventilation any time recently, now may be a good time to do so. I recommend checking it about once per season to ensure it is not obstructed. Make sure you are also using the semi-rigid metal type ducting. It resists crushing, kinking, resists heat better, and resists rodent infestation.

NOTE: Mice are notorious for building nests inside dryers. Give them a warm place with bedding material and they will make it a home.

Make sure the exhaust vent is at least 12 inches off the ground. This will deter mice and others pests (like snakes or birds) from entering the dryer exhaust from the outside. If you place a cover on the vent, make sure it is of the louvered variety. Do not use screens. They will collect lint and clog easily.

An easy test to determine if you have an exhaust problem is to remove the dryer vent hose from the back of the dryer. Turn the dryer on and allow it to run. The air leaving the back of the dryer should be forceful and warm. If the air flow is weak, you need to check the dryer interior. If the air flow is normal, reattach hose and run the dryer again. This time, check the exhaust vent where it exits your home. Again, the air flow should be forceful and warm. If not, you have a clog somewhere in the ventilation ducting which will require cleaning.

NOTE: If you are using plactic ducting, get rid of it. It collapses easy, rips and mice will chew right through it.

In addtion, many home owners unknowingly will push the dryer against the wall and crush the hose behind it. This will also clog the vent and make the dryer inefficient. Leave about a 1 foot space behind the dryer for proper ventilation and ensure the vent hose does not get crushed. Semi-rigid hose will prevent this from happening.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I have seen this problem many times. Let me know what you find and if I can be of further assistance. I hope this helps you.

Dec 30, 2009 | Kenmore 700 6972 Dryer

1 Answer

The lint trap on my dryer is extremely hard to empty the lint sticks to it so bad I have to use a brush to get it out. It seems like it gets too much moisture in it. Is there an easy solution?


If your electric dryer is developing retaining moisture inside the dryer vent, then you have a clog in the exhaust vent ducting somewhere. The moisture comes from condensation inside the dryer exhaust. As your clothes dry, warm moist air is exhausted out the dryer exhaust vent ducting. If you have any kinks, excessive bends, sags, or excessively long ducting runs, the can create choke points for lint to accumulate. Once the lint accumulates, it begins to collect moisture. As it collects moisture, it will act as a sponge and collect more lint until the dryer becomes completely clogged. Left in a clogged state, the dryer begins to overheat and dries less efficiently. You may notice longer dry times or an excessively hot dryer. Eventually the dryer heating circuits will fail. This can also become a fire hazard if the lint becoimes so backed up that it begins to collect on, or near, the heating element.

If you have not checked the dryer ventilation any time recently, now may be a good time to do so. I recommend checking it about once per season to ensure it is not obstructed. Make sure you are also using the semi-rigid metal type ducting. It resists crushing, kinking, resists heat better, and resists rodent infestation.

NOTE: Mice are notorious for building nests inside dryers. Give them a warm place with bedding material and they will make it a home.

Make sure the exhaust vent is at least 12 inches off the ground. This will deter mice and others pests (like snakes or birds) from entering the dryer exhaust from the outside. If you place a cover on the vent, make sure it is of the louvered variety. Do not use screens. They will collect lint and clog easily.

An easy test to determine if you have an exhaust problem is to remove the dryer vent hose from the back of the dryer. Turn the dryer on and allow it to run. The air leaving the back of the dryer should be forceful and warm. If the air flow is weak, you need to check the dryer interior. If the air flow is normal, reattach hose and run the dryer again. This time, check the exhaust vent where it exits your home. Again, the air flow should be forceful and warm. If not, you have a clog somewhere in the ventilation ducting which will require cleaning.

NOTE: If you are using plactic ducting, get rid of it. It collapses easy, rips and mice will chew right through it.

In addtion, many home owners unknowingly will push the dryer against the wall and crush the hose behind it. This will also clog the vent and make the dryer inefficient. Leave about a 1 foot space behind the dryer for proper ventilation and ensure the vent hose does not get crushed. Semi-rigid hose will prevent this from happening.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I have seen this problem many times. Let me know what you find and if I can be of further assistance. I hope you find this information helpful.

Nov 14, 2009 | Washing Machines

1 Answer

I have a Kenmore Elite DRYER that leaks water???? Whats up with this? How do I solve it? Thanks


If your electric dryer is leaking water, then you have a clog somewhere in the exhaust vent ducting somewhere. The water comes from condensation inside the dryer exhaust. As your clothes dry, warm moist air is exhausted out the dryer exhaust vent ducting. If you have any kinks, excessive bends, sags, or excessively long ducting runs, the can create choke points for lint to accumulate. Once the lint accumulates, it begins to collect moisture. As it collects moisture, it will act as a sponge and collect more lint until the dryer becomes completely clogged. Left in a clogged state, the dryer begins to overheat and dries less efficiently. You may notice longer dry times or an excessively hot dryer. Eventually the dryer heating circuits will fail. This can also become a fire hazard if the lint becoimes so backed up that it begins to collect on, or near, the heating element.

If you have not checked the dryer ventilation any time recently, now may be a good time to do so. I recommend checking it about once per season to ensure it is not obstructed. Make sure you are also using the semi-rigid metal type ducting. It resists crushing, kinking, resists heat better, and resists rodent infestation.

NOTE: Mice are notorious for building nests inside dryers. Give them a warm place with bedding material and they will make it a home.

Make sure the exhaust vent is at least 12 inches off the ground. This will deter mice and others pests (like snakes or birds) from entering the dryer exhaust from the outside. If you place a cover on the vent, make sure it is of the louvered variety. Do not use screens. They will collect lint and clog easily.

An easy test to determine if you have an exhaust problem is to remove the dryer vent hose from the back of the dryer. Turn the dryer on and allow it to run. The air leaving the back of the dryer should be forceful and warm. If the air flow is weak, you need to check the dryer interior. If the air flow is normal, reattach hose and run the dryer again. This time, check the exhaust vent where it exits your home. Again, the air flow should be forceful and warm. If not, you have a clog somewhere in the ventilation ducting which will require cleaning.

NOTE: If you are using plactic ducting, get rid of it. It collapses easy, rips and mice will chew right through it.

In addtion, many home owners unknowingly will push the dryer against the wall and crush the hose behind it. This will also clog the vent and make the dryer inefficient. Leave about a 1 foot space behind the dryer for proper ventilation and ensure the vent hose does not get crushed. Semi-rigid hose will prevent this from happening.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I have seen this problem many times. Let me know what you find and if I can be of further assistance. I hope this helps you.

Oct 27, 2009 | Dryers

1 Answer

The flame gose on and off it takes 2hr to dry


if the flame only lights once or twice when you first start your dryer, then afterwards the ignitor just glows yet the gas valve does not open producing fire the gas valve coils are defective.
however if the flame goes on and off all during the cycle as it is designed to and your only complaint is the length of time necessary and not that they do not heat i would suggest thoroughly cleaning out your vent line from where it exits the house back to the dryer. correct any crushing of the junk flexible hose by running rigid proper aluminum ducting and elbows to ensure adequate air flow through the exhaust duct.
best of luck,
ttfn

Oct 24, 2009 | Estate Dryers

1 Answer

How hot is the Vent temp of my new Duet?


It's not the temperature of the air that is the problem. The air is seldom over 160 Deg F. If you have a vent fire the piping needs to last long enough without melting to starve the fire of oxygen in the hopes of extinguishing. Rigid aluminum piping is best suited for this, Rigid flexible is next. The tin foil and white plastic offer little resistance to melting if a fire should begin. The melting would allow the fire to replenish oxygen and support the burning process. The main caution here is to keep your dryer and vent clean...at least annually.

If the duct inside your wall is rigid metal all the way from the dryer to the house exit you need to do nothing to it . Replace the vent between the dryer and the wall with rigid metal 4" piping or hard flexible aluminum piping. If the duct inside your wall is either of the least effective types you need a new run of vent for the dryer to avoid a fire.

You can't use white plastic or flimsy flexible aluminum that feels like aluminum foil when you touch it.

Sep 10, 2009 | Whirlpool Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer is not drying. Lint is not collecting on


There is no lint screen that catches ALL the dryer lint. Some lint will always get exhausted through the dryer vent exhaust ducting along with the moisture from your clothing as it dries. If the exhaust vent remains unobstructed, all the air and lint will be blown out the end of the dryer vent exhaust.

However, if the air meets any resistance from kinks, excessive bends, or sags, moisture will build up inside the dryer vent exhaust causing the lint to stick to the interior walls of the vent hose. Over time this lint builds up and forms a clog. With a clog comes condensation and longer dry times. The dryer will continue to run inefficiently and cause the heating circuits to work harder and overheat. This will eventually lead to a failure of the heating circuits. If you are seeing condensation inside the dryer, it is strongly recommended the you inspect and clean the dryer exhaust vent hose. You should repeat this a couple of times a year to ensure it remains obstruction free.

The most frequent causes of dryer vent clogs comes from the following:

1. Ducting that runs in an upward direction in homes that have an attic exhaust. This is a stupid design that gravity will always win. When the dryer shuts offf, anything left in the vent will fall down the ducting to the base of the wall and accumulate. Over time, this forms a clog.

2. Ducting that runs under the home in a crawl space. If not correctly hung from the rafters, the ducting will develop sags causing choke points where lint can accumulate. Leaving it on the ground is not the answer, either. This gives opportunity for rodents to possibly chew through it. This will cause leaks which exhausts warm moist air under your home resulting in mold and mildew.

3. Using plastic dryer vent hose. This type of hose is not recommended because it kinks easily and can get crushed, causing an obstruction where lint can clog. Rodents can also chew through it easily. Pushing the dryer up against the wall and crushing the hose is a common cause. Use the semi-rigid metal type ducting that resists crushing, kinks and rodent infestation.

4. Rodents. Mice love lint. If given the access to it, they will build inside the dryer vent hose which provides a nice warm place to live with lots of bedding material. Make sure you exhaust vent on the exterior of your home is about 12 inches from the ground.

5. Exhaust vent screens. I know there are many types of exhaust vents on the market that you can purchase that have screens on them to prevent birds and rodents from entering them. The screen can actually become and obstruction, though. The smaller the opening, the more resistance the blower fan meets and lint will clog at the end of the exhaust. If you chose to use a protected exhaust vent, the ones with louvers work better. You will still need to periodically check the ensure it does not become clogged.

6. Excessively long vent hose. The rule of thumb when it comes to dryer vent ducting is: The SHORTER and STRAIGHTER the run, the BETTER. Excessively long dryer vent hoses will clog due to the fact that the blower fan is not able to push all the air and lint all the way to the exhaust.

7. Kinked, Excessively Bent, or Crushed vent hoses. If the vent has any choke points due to kinks, bends, or gets crushed behind the dryer, you will develop ponts where the exhaust vent will clog.

The following link may also help in providing some basic guidance on how to install dryer vent hose:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r389357-dryer_ducting_installation_tips

I know it may seem that I'm beating this point to death, but it is important to provide good air flow for your dryer. The number one cause of dryer failures and house fires comes from poorly maintained and poorly installed ventilation ducting.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Sep 07, 2009 | Dryers

2 Answers

Moisture inside dryer door when clothes are drying. Model number DBXR463ED2WW


If you are experiencing moisture inside the dryer drum, then you have a clog somewhere. A dryer needs proper air flow in order to dry efficiently. If you have not had your dryer exhaust vent ducting checked anytime recently, now might be a good time to do so.

HOW TO DETERMINE IF YOU HAVE A DRYER CLOG:

Remove the dryer exhaust vent hose from the back of the dryer and attempt to dry a load of clothes as you normally would. The air escaping the back of the dryer should be forceful and warm (about 140 degrees F).

If the air flow is normal and the clothes dry properly, you need to check the ventilation from the point where it leaves the dryer, to where it exits your home. Check for kinks, sags or significant bends in the vent ducting that may be causing choke points where lint can accumulate. In addition, it is strongl;y recommended that you use the semi-rigid aluminum ducting as it resists crushing and is heat resistant.

If the air flow is weak, then you have a clog INTERNAL to the dryer. The lint screens do not catch everything. Some lint, along with moist air from your clothes gets exhausted through the blower fan housing and out through the ducting. This is normal. Lint can accumulate over time, however. If allowed to restrict the air flow, the moist air cannot escape and tends to permiate the lint with moisture. Once the lint becomes moist, it sticks inside the ducting and collects more lint to the point where it starts to restrict air flow and reduce the dryer efficiency. It is highly recommended that you check your dryer blower fan housing and internal ducting about once per season to prevent this.

If gone unchecked, the dryer will actually overheat to the point of failure. Accumulations of lint is also a major fire hazard. The majority of the dryer failures I have repaired were caused by poorly installed, kinked, or clogged dryer ventilation.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Jul 28, 2009 | Dryers

1 Answer

LG model DLG5932W dryer wont ignite


Check your venting. Eliminate all or as much flex ducting as possible, replace with rigid or semi-rigid aluminum. Make sure outside vent opens a full 4 inches, not just two inches (or that louvers are clear of lint build up), and clean out all vent pipe of lint. Make vent as short as possible, with as few turns as possible. You may have to reset the high temp thermo again also until vent problem is corrected.

Apr 07, 2009 | LG DLG5932W Gas Dryer

1 Answer

How can I connect my dryer to the vent without crimping the hose? Whenever I connect the hose and push the dryer to the wall, the hose gets holes in it...


The dryer should not be pushed all the way against the wall. For the ventilation to properly work, you should leave about a one foot space between the back of the dryer and the wall. Using 90 degree elbows on the dryer and wall can also eliminate crimping. Also, it is strongly recommended that use use the semi-rigid metal type vent hose ducting. It is not that expensive and comes in adjustable lengths. The semi-rigid ducting is recommended by most builders and it resists crimping and rodent damage. If you continue to use a dryer with the exhaust vent clogged it will lead to eventual heating circuit failure due to overheating. If you have any questions, please post back and let me know. I hope this helps answer some of your questions.

NOTE: If you purchase semi-rigid ducting, make sure you purchased the hose clamps that go with it. This will prevent the hose from slipping off the connection points.

Jun 15, 2008 | Dryers

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