Question about Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

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Hi, I have taken over 20 rolls of film so far and haven't had a problem until now. Whenever, I go outside to take pictures (in the daylight), my pictures come out black (last 5 rolls of film) In the same roll of film, I have taken photos at night (which seem to come out fine). I have bracketed my outdoor pictures with quite a wide range....in fact today it was a very gloomy morning and I set my exposure all the way up to f/16 at shutter speed 1/500. Wouldn't this get me an underexposed shot? I thought so but my film came out black. When I'm bracketing, I don't even noticed a change between them....they are all the same dark color. I noticed that this started to happen ever since I removed the lens and put it back on....but it seems to be on there fine. I'm thinking that the higher shutter speeds aren't working or something. Please help!!!!

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I think the aperture is not shutting down to the opening you set it to. In an SLR, the aperture is normally fully open for viewing through the lens. When you press the button, the mirror flips up and the aperture closes to the figure you have set, then the shutter fires. If you have set a daytime aperture and the aperture sticks, you get a wide open aperture and an overexposed shot, but at night, you have set an open or almost open aperture anyway.

It is possible that the shutter is the problem, but the aperture is more likely to go wrong in my experience. It only takes a drop of oil on the blades. There ought to be a button or lever to shut the aperture down for depth of field preview which you could use to test this, or just look in the lens when the shutter fires to see if the aperture closes.

Posted on Nov 14, 2010

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