Question about Harley Davidson Harley-Davidson FLSTC Heritage Softail Classic i

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94 flstc. On first start-up, 35 AC stator, 14.5 v off battery. About 15 minutes into ride, lights dim to near nothing, battery always needs a charge after even a short ride. Regulator?

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It sounds to me to be the battery. if you have a digital volt meter charge up your battery and first with the bike off check your voltage at the battery if this is between 13 and 14.5 volts that's a good voltage (but the cca ((cold cranking amps)) can be off) after you've gotten your voltage start the bike and test for voltage at 3000 rpm or 10% throttle if the voltage is over 16 volts or has not changed and starting to drop, check the connection to the stator and regulator located at the front of the primary chain case on the inner primary and that the long single wire from the regulator to the battery is good check 3000rpm voltage again if this did not fix the problem then you may have a problem with your voltage regulator.

Posted on Jan 15, 2011

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I have a 1985 Kawasaki vulcan I put a new stator in rode a couple days now battery wont charge. Try to start and nothing barely a click from starter


Buy a "multimeter" (about $10) and switch it to DC volts.
Fully charge the battery.
Hook leads to the battery (red to positive, black to negative).
Start engine, and check meter.
You should be pulling about 13-14 volts DC.
If not, unplug output wires on the voltage regulator and hook the leads to it.
Start engine, and again, at idle you should be getting about 13-14 volts DC.
If not, unplug alternator (stator and rotor) and hook meter leads to wires, AND SWITCH TO AC VOLTS on the meter.
Start bike, and at idle you should be pulling 15-20 volts or more, with it rising (sometimes drastically) when you rev the engine.
This will tell you if the alternator's bad, or the regulator.
Also, you said you changed the stator, but sometimes the rotor becomes de-magnitized, especially if you've dropped it.

May 23, 2014 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Why battery not charging, test bat its good


Could be a bad regulator or alternator.

The connection where the alternator stator wires plug into the regulator could be corroded/dirty and need to be cleaned and sprayed with electrical contact cleaner and protected with dielectric grease because corroded wires going to the battery or alternator from the stator or the regulator will affect the ability of the charging system to properly charge a battery.

Check regulator ground by using an ohmmeter with one lead on a known good ground, such as the battery ground cable, and the other on the regulator base.

Current and Voltage Output Test
This test requires a load tester. As it appears that many shops/techs do not understand electricity and as they are relatively expensive testers many shops do not even have one. If you have one connect the negative and positive leads to the battery terminals, place the load tester induction pickup over the positive regulator cable and run the engine at 3000 RPM, increasing the load until a constant voltage reading of 13.0 VDC is obtained. At this point the current output should be 26 to 32 AMPS. Make a note of this reading as it will be used if a TOTAL CURRENT DRAW TEST will also be done. (A rider's riding habits, i.e. rpm of the engine while usual riding is being done could be significantly lower than 3000 RPM which would mean that less than the above optimal voltages would be produced so a rider in too high a gear for a given speed might have too low an operating RPM and thereby produce less current than is required to meet the bike's electrical load demands.)
CAUTION
Do not under any circumstances leave any load switch turned on for more than 20 seconds or overheating and tester damage are quite likely to occur.

Voltage Output Test
After removing the load, read the load tester voltage meter AND if voltage to the battery is not more than 15 VDC then voltage output is within specifications but if the voltage is higher then the regulator is not functioning properly or there are lose or dirty connections present.

AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

Rotor Inspection
Inspect the rotor for physical signs of damage. THEN remove center bolt and inspect for signs of the center hole having become oval and ensure that the stator bolts have not come loose and come into contact with the rotor.

May 08, 2014 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

2 Answers

Battery will not charge


To check your charging system, first, you must have a fully charged battery in the bike. Start the bike up and using a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) put the red lead on the positive post and the black lead on the negative post. Put the meter in DC Volts, 50 volt range. Idle the bike up a bit and you should read about 14.5 to 14.8 volts.

If you don't get anymore than 12.6 volts at the battery. Go to the left side of the engine and pull the connector for the stator at the front of the engine. Put your meter in AC volts, 50 volt range. Touch one meter lead to one pin and the other to the other pin. It makes no difference which lead goes where just don't allow the lead to touch the engine case. Your meter should read 25-35 Volts AC at this point. Notice the AC, not DC, voltage at the stator. Make sure your meter is in DC at the battery test and AC at the stator test. If you have less than 15 volts at the stator, your stator is bad. If the voltage is where it should be at the stator, you voltage regulator is probably bad.

Good Luck
Steve

May 29, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

1 Answer

2000 heritage softail....new battery losing charge as i ride....then wont turn over after shutting down...even 1-2 mile of riding ???


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below and good luck.Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

May 21, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

1 Answer

99 Roadking EFI, engine light came on, lights dimmed, speedodometer stuck at seventy. R&R battery worked fine for a short ride, now same result. Ohm'd coil, 4 ohms. pins to ground is high ohms Running...


Hi Mitch_steven, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12 volts or better after charging.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor. Good luck

May 01, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHRCI Road King...

1 Answer

1990 FLSTC. Lights are dim and trouble starting. When running it wants to die and runs rough>


It sounds like you've got a charging system problem. To check this, first you must charge your battery fully. Take the seat off the bike, two large bolts on either side of the seat. Then with a fully charged battery, start the bike. Using Digitial Volt Ohm meter, put the red lead of the meter to the positive terminal of the battery and the black lead to the negative terminal. Put the meter in 50 volt DC range. The voltage should start out at about 12.5 volts and slowly build up to nearly 14.5-15.0 volts. If it does not, something is wrong.

Now, down on the engine on the left side near the end of your oil filter there is a connector plug. Disconnect this plug and you'll see two pins down inside the plug in the engine case. Put your meter in the AC 50 range. This is the stator of your alternator and the output is Alternating Current, thus the AC setting on your meter. Now, start the bike and bring it to a fast idle. Put one lead from the meter to either pin and the other lead to the other pin. It makes no difference which pin since its AC current. You should read at least 20 volts. Typically it reads somewhere between 25-30 Volts AC depending on how fast your engine is running. If this checks right, your alternator stator is good.

Check the plug that you unplugged from the engine case. Make sure the sockets up inside the rubber plug are clean and that they make good contact with the pins. Check the ground on your regulator. I like to put one of those "star" lockwashers between the regulator and the frame of the bike on each bolt to insure the regulator has a good ground. Also, if you don't already have one, buy yourself one of those clips that holds the plug together when it's plugged in. I've seen the back out and not make contact while the engine is running.

Now that you know your alternator is good and your regulator is properly plugged in, run the first test again. If the test still shows a low voltage at the battery, replace the regulator. But, you MUST use a fully charged battery to do this test otherwise you'll get a low reading. Good Luck

Jan 18, 2010 | 2005 Harley Davidson FLSTC - FLSTCI...

2 Answers

2001 Road King battery low after long ride.


that sounds like a bad connection. follow the positive and negative cables around and insure good connections. lack of lights and dash panel info is a sign of bad connection or hate to say bad battery. if you had lights and dash lit up i would start at the starter area next.

Sep 09, 2009 | Harley Davidson Harley-Davidson Motorcycle...

2 Answers

Harley Davidson battery went dead after riding 20 miles during the day. I rode my Harley Dyna Super Glide (2002) about 10 miles, made a stop and then rode 10 miles back. I stopped to get gas about 1 mile...


1.What?

2.What?
You charged the battery off of the battery charger with a trickle charge. The battery wouldn't charge while you're riding, because your alternator took a cr@p.
(Sorry if I seem gruff, but I'm an old biker, and Harleys are all I ride. I'm also a Harley mechanic.
Shhhh! I don't want that to get around! lol!)

3.Battery is at 13.4 volts now? What is the specific gravity of the acid in each cell? Don't have a hydrometer? Do you have a load tester? No? Since you measured the voltage, do you have a multimeter?

Test the voltage with the bike running. It should be around 14.6 volts when charging, less with the battery fully charged.
Don't get the correct reading, then you better look at alternator replacement. (Regulator is built in)

Jul 13, 2009 | 2002 Harley Davidson FXD Dyna Super Glide

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