Question about Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Whwn I switch on the system and even when the sound is ZERO. there is a hissing/humming noise from all the speakers. Not sure whay this sound is there.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 757 Answers

It is noise most often referred to as E.M.I. or R.F.I. ( electromagnetic or radio frequency interference). Sources of it can come from other devices plugged into the same circuitry or from nearby running appliances containing electric motors such as fans, or fluorescent lighting.

Things that you can do to reduce this are as follows;

Relocate the receiver and/or plug it into a different outlet.

Plug the receiver into an electronic interference rejecting device such as a power conditioner.

Use ferrite clamps on your power cord of the receiver and all of it's connected devices, and on the analog audio inputs.

Move any power cables closer than about 6" to any other cables connected to the receiver, and any cables crossing each other at 90 degrees.

Make sure all of your RCA, composite and coaxial connections are completely inserted on each end and tight.

Posted on Nov 14, 2010

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How do I fix........Getting rid of background noise coming from my JVC KWV21BT?


You have described a grounding issue. This "hiss" is due to one or more speakers &/or the radio itself not grounded properly which is producing the "hiss". I would take it back to the installer and have him correct this problem. They have a responsibility to make sure it's working 100%.

Feb 03, 2016 | JVC Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

Tv and speakers buzzing noise


If the hum is a low note continuous hum, its at 'mains' frequency. The power cables to the unit (or inside it) are getting too close to the cables that carry sound signals to the center speaker. The mains power naturally hums and if mains wires are near to audio kit wires they pick up this sound and play it through their system/speakers. Check the wires to and from it make sure the connections are good and firm. Seperate these wires by at least one inch from any power cables, use tape to hold them down and away from each other.

Dec 15, 2013 | Bang and Olufsen Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

My srm 450v2 is making a low hissing sound have changed the lead and power chord but its still the same if you tap the mic the noise stops until you start speaking again and it still does it when no xlr...


you may have a bad ground somewhere within the wiring. If the hiss disappears when you use the mic, it is probably because you are temporarily providing a ground with the x channel of your xlr. either the bad ground is within the speaker, or it is within the house wiring. if you have any fluorescent lights nearby, or on a similar circuit, you will get a hum or hiss. Beyond that, I'm not sure what it could be except possibly a blown component within the speaker.

Mar 08, 2011 | Mackie SRM-450 System

1 Answer

Hissing noise from right front speaker


Check for a power source nearby. Speakers are notorius for hissing (60 cycle hum) when near an electrical wire, outlet, 'zip-strip', amplifier or tranformer. It sounds like this might be likely in that it is only one speaker that is misbehaving.

Dec 17, 2010 | Bose Acoustimass 15 System

2 Answers

I stopped having sound coming from the speakers. I checked and we are not on mute, and the volume is turned up high.


Make sure all your connections are tight and you have power to your speakers...Then go Start>Control Panel>Sound and Hardware>Sound, after you are in here make sure that your speakers are selected as default device.
Hope this helps, pls rate

Mar 19, 2010 | Proview Computers & Internet

1 Answer

RADIO SHOWS STATIONS BUT NO SOUND FROM SPEAKERS


if no sound from both speakers check fuse,
if some hissing or humming on full volume then its a fault in oscilator section
if there is no hiss or hum at full volume its a breakage in the wires of speakers, if one speaker is ok its aagain a wire open problem in out put section
open up the speakers and just apply 1.5 volts dc for fraction of second to the speaker leads , if theres crackling the speaker is ok
also see for torn out cones or stuck cone or speaker coil open.

Jan 16, 2009 | 1992 Mercedes-Benz 190

2 Answers

Logitech x530 hissing noise


I had the same problem for the longest time with my set of Logitech 540 5.1 speakers. Turns out the solution was pretty simple. All I did was open the Master Volume controller and mute the Microphone. Hissing went to zero. Sound is great now.

May 15, 2008 | Logitech X-530 Computer Speakers

1 Answer

Webcam Speakers Echo and Double Feedback


"Noise", as used in this document, is a general term referring to any sound a speaker system makes that is not part of the original source material. There are many different types and sources of noise, each with its own solution. Below is an explanation of the common types of noise, what causes them, and how to minimize their occurrence.
Hum or Buzz
There are four common causes of humming and buzzing:
  1. Sound card If the humming or buzzing gets louder or softer with changes in the volume setting, this is an indication of noise coming from the sound card. In this case, check all of the connections to the sound card to make sure they are all completely plugged in and secure. Then, adjust the level setting of the sound mixer to obtain the best performance. Generally, you should leave your CD volume settings in the mixer at full and reduce the sound card's master output level down. For information on doing this, please refer to your sound card manufacturer's documentation.
  2. Unused input cables If you are not using all of the source inputs to your speaker system (such as using a 5.1 speaker system with a 4 channel sound card), the unused input cables will pick up noise. The solution is different for each speaker system, as described below:
    Z-540 / Z-560 (2 channel sound card): Depress the M3D button.
    Z-640 (4 channel sound card): Depress the Matrix button.
    Z-680 (2 or 4 channel sound card): Disconnect the unused input cables from the control pod
  3. High-power devices If you are using other high powered devices on the same electrical circuit, they may be causing hum or buzz. If so, discontinue their use while you are using your speaker system. Examples of such devices include microwave ovens, halogen lamps, power tools, etc. Also note that high-power devices with dimmer switches (such as halogen torchiere lamps) will cause an especially pronounced buzzing effect. To minimize hum or buzz, make sure that the dimmer switch on these products is either all the way on or off.
  4. Electric Polarity In many countries, the US being one, the electrical power grid is polarized. In these countries, the power plugs are designed so they can only be inserted into the wall socket in a single direction. For example, in the US one of the plug blades is larger than the other. To avoid humming and buzzing, both your computer and speaker system must be properly plugged into polarized outlets. If your wall outlets do not have polarized plugs, as in the case of many older homes, and you are using adapters to plug these power cords into the wall, it is possible that the polarity of either your computer or your speaker system is reversed. In many other countries, such as most of the European continent, wall sockets are not polarized at all - making it even more difficult to properly match the computer and speaker system. To solve the problem you will need to remove the power plug from the wall outlet, rotate the plug 180°, and re-insert it into the wall. Try this for your speaker system power cord, your computer power cord, or both. You should be able to find a combination that will eliminate the humming and buzzing.
Pops and Clicks
There are three main causes of pops and clicks:
  1. Sound Card Many pops and clicks are created by the sound card. There are two common causes: sound card quality and older or mismatched drivers. If the overall volume level of the pops and clicks goes up and down as you change the volume on the speaker system, the noise is being generated by your sound card. Lower quality sound cards don't include the necessary circuitry to cleanly remove noise from the sound output. Logitech's higher-powered systems, such as the Z-560 and Z-680, are also sensitive to the overall quality level of the sound card. If you are using an older or lower quality sound card, we suggest upgrading your sound card. The other primary cause is older or mismatched drivers. Make sure you are using the latest drivers for your sound card.
  2. Multi-tasking If you are running more than one program on your computer that accesses the sound system at the same time, small pops and clicks can be common. This is a function of your computer and/or sound card. A common example is using a program that generates occasional audio feedback (such as beeps or other sound effects) while listening to an MP3 track in the background. The solution is to turn off audio feedback in the first application so that the background MP3 track is uninterrupted.
  3. Interrupts in the Digital Bitstream On digital systems, such as the Z-680, it is normal to hear a very faint "tick" when you switch between inputs (by pressing the input button). You may also hear louder 'clicks' or 'pops' on a device such as a standalone DVD player or a sound card if it is plugged into one of the digital inputs. On some systems, this noise may occur when skipping tracks, switching audio streams (for example, from Dolby Digital to DTS), or navigating a DVD menu. The clicks and pops occur because the device is sending out an interrupted digital data stream. This behavior generally occurs with older software and older players, but is uncommon on most modern equipment. The Z-680 has been extensively tested with the latest sound cards, software DVD players, and standalone DVD and CD players. If you experience extensive popping and clicking, we suggest upgrading to the latest version of your software DVD player or, if using a stand alone device, trying a different speaker model. If you need more assistance with this issue, please contact Customer Support.
Stutter
A stuttering sound track is an indication of either insufficient or conflicting computer resources. Check to make sure that your computer has sufficient processor power and memory to handle the applications you are running, especially if you are using a software DVD player. Defragmenting your hard drive may also help. If you are sure you have sufficient resources, check to make sure that you don't have any conflicting IRQ or DMA channels.
We have also seen some software DVD player/sound card combinations that cannot properly output a Dolby Digital or DTS signal through the sound card's S/PDIF digital connector. (S/PDIF is a generic term for either coax or optical digital connections.) The result, when using a Z-680 hooked up to a S/PDIF connector, is a stuttering soundtrack. As mentioned, this stuttering is caused by the computer, not the Z-680 speakers. Switching the software DVD player's sound output to the 5.1 analog outputs will generally solve this problem.
Hiss
All high-powered amplification devices - everything from multimedia systems to home theater systems to movie theater sound systems -- generate some level of background noise, or hiss. In addition, low quality sound cards with poor signal-to-noise ratios can generate a significant amount of steady hiss that is reproduced on the speakers. Under normal conditions at a normal listening distance, the hiss coming from the sound system should not be noticeable. In a very quiet room, or if you place your ear very close to the speaker, you may hear a very low level hiss. This is normal, but should be completely masked by normal music and game sounds.
If you find that hiss is noticeable, it is likely that the speakers are too close to your listening position. If the speakers are too close, you will not obtain the best imaging of the sound and you risk damage to your hearing when the system is playing at full power levels. Try moving the speakers further away from your normal listening position. We recommend at least 18" for the moderately-powered systems (such as Z-340, Z-540, and Z-640) and at least 30" for higher-powered systems (such as the Z-560 and Z-680).
Also, note that the satellites in most Logitech speaker products are designed to be wall-mounted. Wall mounting the speakers provides two benefits: 1) it moves the of the satellites further away from your listening position, making any hiss less noticeable and 2) it moves all of the satellites further away from each other, providing better channel separation and surround sound spatialization.

Feb 16, 2008 | Logitech Webcam

1 Answer

Speakers hissing/humming


Hi Nate41
you won't do anithyng
may be is a bad resistor inside, that get hot and probably start to do this problem. try disconecting the speakers, and move to other place, more cooler, and try to see if you don't get the hissing and humming sound now. sometimes dust and hot places get to this problem.
beside that, may be a path to a problem.

Nov 26, 2007 | JBL CREATURE II Computer Speakers

Not finding what you are looking for?
Audio Players & Recorders Logo

Related Topics:

44 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Audio Players & Recorders Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

 Grubhead
Grubhead

Level 3 Expert

5047 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

74106 Answers

Are you an Audio Player and Recorder Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...