Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ8 Digital Camera

1 Answer

My Camera's shutter button is insanely hard to push down.

Instead of having a normal 2-click motion (1st is auto focus, second is shutter activation) it goes to auto focus, then no click for the shutter. It still takes the picture but requires about 10x more force to push down than it normally should.

How should I go about fixing this? I could take the camera apart, but am weary about it.

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  • codip426 Jun 21, 2008

    Well, it worked, but I can't get the zoom button to sit flush. Any tips on that?

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Hello codip426,

I had a similar problem with my FZ7 a few days back after a hectic day of shooting. However, one of my cursor buttons at the back was affected. So this solution may or may not work for you. But try it since opening the camera should be the last(est!) resort.

Take a very very slim steel needle, like the ones used for insulin injectors. They are far slimmer than paper pins or staples and offer a good grip required for this operation. You can find one at a medical store. Ask for insulin pen needles.

Gently, avoiding making scratches, insert it into the space between the shutter and the zoom control lever. Run this needle inside that space around the shutter, 360 degrees. Do it gently and with even force. If you meet any resistance try to dislodge it gently.

The problem that you have usually occurs when the button is out of its housing. The needle trick usually fixes it.

I hope it works for you.

Posted on Jun 17, 2008

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