Question about Dometic 57915531 Air Conditioner

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Circuit breaker kickes off at different times.

I think the Motor Starter (current relay) might have pitted contacts causing
high current & causing the 20A dreaker to kick off. The praesures are
normal & so are the compressure amps.The blower motor turns easy &
doesent seam to bind up. I cant find the WSX-7 Motor Starter anywhere
to see if that is the proublem. Can you help me ? I really think that is
the proublem. What do you think ?

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  • 230 Answers

I assume that you are a technician so you are aware of the electrical dangers of these tests. If you are not a tech, please call one.

It may be the contactor relay but first try this too.

At this point I would perform an over all amp reading between the unit and the breaker box somewhere. Make sure you take a reading at the start up, as this is when the system will pull the most amps. If the over all amps DO NOT exceed the breaker rating and the breaker still trips, I would suggest that the breaker is weak and should be replaced.

If during this test you find that the amps DO exceed the breaker ratings then I would try to look at the start run capacitor.

Posted on Jun 17, 2008

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As soon as I turn headlights on it blows the fuse for gages on dash no wires touching and lights don't come on gages work if I don't turn headlights on


Hi Bobbi
A 50w Headlamp will draw 4 Amps (Ohms Law 50/12=4.1)
So... 2 Low beams will draw 8 Amps.
Obviously more for high beam and high wattage Quartz Bulbs.
That is a lot for a small switch (contacts) to handle.
This is why a lot of vehicles use a Relay to power the Headlamps.
The relay is connected directly from the Battery to the Headlamps.
The large internal contacts can handle the higher current (30A) and the dash headlight switch connects to the magnetic coil inside the relay and is only used to pull the contacts closed.
Does your circuit include a relay.? Do you hear a relay click?
simple headlight relay wiring

To assist with your troubleshooting, try disconnecting one head lamp bulb to reduce current load. Does the fuse blow?
A temporary12v circuit breaker could be substituted for the fuse until you determine the problem.


If the circuit is using a relay then there will be a fat wire going from the battery to the Relay. The fine wire on the relay input is the trigger. A 12v test lamp is really useful for troubleshooting around the car. Also a cheap multimeter. Clamp style current meter is also handy to see exactly what current is blowing the fuse

Relays

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/NARVA-CIRCUIT-BREAKER-REPLACES-STANDARD-BLADE-FUSE-BATTERY-15A-AMP-12V-55715-/321234642731?hash=item4acb13a72b
There is a 10A circuit breaker also like above

Automotive Circuit Breakers Wiring Products

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There is likely a relay installed in the circuit for the starter crank form the alarm/immobilizer. The contacts on these relays will arc when mating and separating due the large current being drawn by the starter. This will cause pitting on the contacts and result in a voltage drop (thus the 9V). This voltage is not sufficient to engage most starters. Locate and replace the defective relay.

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My 1998 Taurus overheated on freeway now it won't crank over starter engages but won't turn the engine over


If it works again when the engine cools, you can fix the overheating problem and limp along for awhile longer, or replace the starter now. The heat causes expansion, and a bushing, bearing or other part of the starter assy. could be dragging when hot.

When you turn the key to the Start position, a low current voltage is sent to the starter solenoid; that activates the very large contacts in the solenoid, which feeds a large current straight from the battery to the starter. There is so much current that even these large contacts eventually get pitted, burnt, or otherwise stop making good contact. The same heat that can affect the starter, can make the contacts expand unequally. In that case, a twist or other alignment problem, say e.g., one that allows a pitted contact to miss the negative pit it was aligned with that high point would not have a large enough area of contact to turn the starter. You would hear the click of the solenoid, but not the winding of the starter. The end result is usually the same; replace the starter. Years ago you could replace just the solenoid, on the fender usually, but I doubt a 1998 Taurus would have an external solenoid.

That is in no way related to the overheating, of course. Um.. June 1st is tomorrow, btw. You might correct the time on your communication device. "Posted by Kevin Benson on Jun 01, 2015"

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If you pull the relay out, you will see it is a plastic box or cube with 5 metal prongs or "terminals" coming out the bottom.
The fuel pump relay sends power to the fuel pump when the relay is switched on. When the relay is on, a connection is made inside the relay, between a hot battery source coming in on one terminal, and the wire going out to the fuel pump's motor on another terminal. You can think of the relay as an on/off switch in the circuit to the fuel pump. The engine computer turns it on and off by sending or stop sending an electric current out on a wire to another terminal at the relay- the so called "coil side" of a relay. When the coil side gets current through it, it causes the other side , the power side, to close contact!!!zzzzzzzz

It may help you understand, if you realize why relays are so widespread in automobile circuits. Say you want an on/off switch to a motor drawing several amps of current. If you run that high current through a switch all the time, you will burn out a lot of switches. Enter a relay-it can take a lot of current through it, it is designed to. And all it needs to make contact, or turn on, is a small current signal through it's internal coil.

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Just purchased a 94 concord. When I turn the key to start sometimes the dash lights comes on with no start, sometimes I hold the key in start for 3-5 seconds and then the car will start, and sometimes the...


The problem sounds very much as if it is on the electrical side. OK so here is the path: Battery, Ignition switch position 2 and fuel pump is engaged, position 3 and current passes through the starter fuse and relay to the starter solenoid (located piggy back on the starter motor) The starter solenoid pushes the starter motor armature forward to engage with the toothed rim of the flywheel. At the same time the armature bridges the contacts between the high power contacts to cause the motor to spin up and turn the engine over. Check the external stuff first. Make sure the battery terminal and cable connections are clean and tight. Make sure the earth return strap from the engine block to the car body is intact, clean and secure, free of corrosion (unbolt, wire brush clean and re-bolt). Remove starter motor and solenoid, dismantle and check on the heavy duty electrical power striker plate contacts for wear, replace as necessary (often these starter motors are by Denso and replacement kits for the copper contacts can be got for less than $10). Check the main starter fuse, clean the contacts until bright. Check the starter relay. If possible remove the cover and inspect the printed circuit board, resolder any dry or annular cracked joints. Pass a folded piece of fine sand paper between the electrical breaker contacts to freshen them up. Make sure the relay pins and corresponding sockets are all clean and bright. The above sounds like a lot of work but once it is done and you are reassured that everything is as it should be you will not need to re-examine this for another ten years or more. Lastly, make sure the ignition switch is OK. Contacts can become worn and if you find that a wiggle the ignition barrel with the key in results in 'start' versus 'no start' then the fault is here.

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Power windows wont work what fuses can i check i have replaces the driverside switch.


Fuses, Switches, Circuit Breakers And Relays
Check under hood and under the dash driver's side.
There may be a sticker on the inside of the panel cover that tells you the legend. Otherwise, it requires testing each and every one of those fuses, preferably with a fuse tester that can do it more expediently than pulling each one out and looking for a broken conductor.


Most vehicles use one or more fuse panels. This one is located on the driver’s side kick panel tcca6p01.jpg

It is possible for large surges of current to pass through the electrical system of your vehicle. If this surge of current were to reach the load in the circuit, this surge could burn it out or cause severe damage to the vehicle’s electrical system. It can overload the wiring, causing the harness to get hot and melt the insulation. To protect vehicle wiring, fuses, circuit breakers and/or fusible links are typically installed into the power supply wires throughout the electrical system. These items are nothing more than a built-in weak spot in the system. When an excessive amount of current flows through a circuit it causes an increase in heat throughout the wiring. Fuses and circuit breakers are designed as the weak link in the system and will disconnect the circuit to prevent damage to the components contained within that circuit. Components are equipped with connectors so they may be replaced in situations where they were damaged due to a power surge.
The following are descriptions as to how fuses and circuit breakers protect the electrical system:
  • Fuse- A fuse is a weak link in the system designed to create an open circuit when the amperage flowing through that circuit exceeds the limits of the fuse. As the amperage increases, the conductor within the fuse heats up and eventually melts and breaks apart. This open circuit interrupts the flow of current and protects the components in the circuit.
  • Circuit Breaker- A circuit breaker is a "self-repairing" fuse. It will open the circuit in the same fashion as a fuse. The surge creates heat the same way that a fuse is affected. When the surge subsides and the circuit cools down, the circuit breaker will reset and allow current to flow through the circuit. Typically circuit breakers do not need to be replaced.
  • Fusible Link- A fusible link (fuse link or main link) is a short length of special, high temperature insulated wire that acts as a fuse. When an excessive electrical current passes through a fusible link, the thin gauge wire inside the link melts, creating an open to protect the circuit. To repair the circuit, the link must be replaced. Some newer type fusible links are housed in plug-in modules, which are simply replaced like a fuse, while older type fusible links must be cut and spliced if they melt
CAUTION
Always replace fuses, circuit breakers and fusible links with identically rated components. Under no circumstances should a protection device of higher or lower amperage rating be substituted.
Switches Switches are used in electrical circuits to control current flow. The most common use of relays and switches is to open and close circuits between the battery and various electrical loads in a circuit. loads are rated according to the amount of amperage they can handle. All of the current that the controlled load uses flows through a switch. Using a switch with an amperage rating lower than what the circuit is rated for could overload and cause damage to the components located on that circuit. Relays
The underhood fuse and relay panel contains fuses, relays, flashers and fusible links tcca6p02.jpg

Relays are used to control high-current loads with lower currents. Since these some loads require a large amount of current, the thickness of the wire in the circuit is also greater. If a switch were used to control the circuit, all of the current required to power the high-current load would have to pass through the switch. From a design standpoint, relays are used to limit current through switches and reduce the amount of heavy gauge wiring in the vehicle.
Relays are constructed of a set of switch contacts and a small electro-magnetic coil. When current flow through the coil a magnetic field is created. This field causes the contacts to touch, in turn completing the high-current circuit. Typically, relays are constructed so that the secondary contacts are open when the relay is de-energized (turned off). Circuits where relays are used include, but are not limited to, the horns, headlights, starter motor, electric fuel pump, blower motor and cooling fan motor.
Relays are composed of a coil and a set of switch contacts. The large wires connect a high current power source to one side of the relay switch contacts and from the other side of the relay switch contacts to the load. The smaller wires connect a low current power source to the relay control coil and from the control coil to the control switch and then to ground. tcca6g02.gif

Load Every electrical circuit must include a "load'' (something to consume voltage from the power source). Loads are resistances included in circuits to limit current flow. Loads are the components installed in circuits, such as headlights, wiper motors, door lock solenoids. Without a load, the battery would flow all of its energy through a circuit directly to ground. This is called a "dead-short to ground". The unchecked flow of electricity would cause a great amount of damage to the circuit by developing a tremendous amount of heat. Short circuits can develop sufficient heat to melt the insulation of surrounding wires, even reducing a multiple wire cable to a lump of plastic and copper.

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1 Answer

When i turn the key the cylanoid kicks in but it wont crank over


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1 Answer

I need a contact point at the overloads to interlock a different


If is a " starter" it wil have an overload relay with a NC contact. The newer IEC style starters are actually two components . The contactor and the overload realy assembly. These overload asembliess come in various ranges of current depending on the motor. They usually have both a NO and a NC contact. You didn't furnish the model number of the new starter. You are correct to use a starter to match the overloads to the motor current, not a contactor.

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I need to know how the wires go on the starter relay for a yamaha ttr 225


Any relay is made up of a low current circuit and high current circuit. The low current circuit is connected to your starter switch, this is the connector block that you see on the relay. The high current circuit is connected from your battery to the relay and then from the other terminal to your starter motor. Your starter motor will complete the circuit by going to ground. These are the heavy cables (high amperage) that get connected by nuts.

Make sure you have the correct amperage relay for your bike as to low a grade and it becomes a fire hazard.

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