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How do I fix a blown output transistor??? - AudioBahn A2801Q Car Audio Amplifier

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My mtx jh600 has 60 volts at output.Why?


any dc voltage at amp output is a sign this is blown. the problem is on the output transistors and can only be fixed by a technician

Oct 11, 2014 | MTX Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

Channel A on my PMP 1280s is blown


This website appears to have diagram for it. You will have to register to log in. http://elektrotanya.com/?q=hu/content/how-change-site-language-english
May of been some other component burnt out. Only way is by test meter and testing. Quite possible transistor burnt out.
You should be able to test it in circuit for Short circuits.
If output transistors faulty make sure you check driver transistors as well. Hope some of that helps.

Nov 19, 2013 | Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

Blown transistor output


open the amp, you will see the remaining parts of the blown transistor in the pcb mostly the soldered legs will be there. before desolder the legs, findout the right position and direction of the trnsistor insertion to the pcb by comparing the blownout transistor with the legs on the pcb once confirmed the position write down(or draw) in apaper then remove the legs from the pcb and solder a new transistor in the pcb..i hope this will help you to fix your problem thanks.

Aug 31, 2013 | Sony STR-DE595 5-Channel Amplifier

1 Answer

I own a Aragon 4004 mkII. Recently the the banana plugs on the right speaker output touched bridging a contact. The amp had been turned on and left on for up to 10min with this short occuring. Now the...


Tough one. I repair these for a living. A number of possibilities exist. Likely output transistors are blown on the bad channel. Fuses are likely blown. If the fuses are BLACK inside, don't just put new fuses in, more damage WILL occur. This is a bit more than 'good with a soldering iron' will fix. You need to know how to test an output transistor. You need to look up the transistor type so you know what it is. A service manual will be a big help (I could not find one online.) If more than two outputs are gone on the one side, all should be changed, they are supposed to be MATCHED. Remove and replace all damaged outputs, or replace them all if two are blown. Find the driver transistors and check them for short circuits. After repair, start the amp on a dummy load of a 250watt light bulb to prevent destroying the amp if there is a problem. If you are unsure of any part of this, find an electronics technician to help.

Feb 20, 2012 | Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

Mackie 1200/1400 blows all 4 10 amp fuses


missmatched impedance, insufficient ground, blown transistor.

Jul 20, 2009 | Bob Mackie Mackie M-1400i Power Amplifier...

1 Answer

Noisy left hand power output stage. Noisy transistor? No circuit diagram.


If the speaker is not blown, there must be an output capacitor. If no output capacitor, and you have a blown transistor the speaker will blow from DC current. You can further check the transistors with a multimeter. A transistor looks like 2 diodes and you should be abobe to test with a mulimenter like a diode test.

May 12, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I have a fosgate 301x with power to the amp but none coming out


There are many different ways that an amp can fail but the two most common failures are shorted output transistors and blown power supply transistors (< those are not blown). There are several types of protection circuits in amplifiers. The most common are over-current and thermal. The over-current protection is supposed to protect the output transistors. Sometimes it doesn't work well enough to prevent the failure of the output transistors but it will work well enough to shut the supply down before the power supply FETs are destroyed. If the amp remains in protect mode, goes into protect mode or blows the fuse as soon as the remote voltage is applied, shorted output transistors are almost certainly the cause. If the fuse protecting the amp is too large, if the protection circuit doesn't respond quickly enough or if the power supply is poorly designed, the power supply transistors may fail. If you see a lot of black soot on the power supply transistors (near the power transformer), the power supply transistors have failed. Soot on the board doesn't necessarily mean the transistors have failed. Sometimes, technicians don't clean up the mess from a previous failure.
In general, when a transistor fails, it will either short (common for output AND power supply transistors) or open (common for power supply transistors). Transistors act like valves. They control the current flowing through a circuit. A shorted transistor acts like a valve that's stuck open (passing too much current). In the case of an output transistor, the shorted transistors tries to deliver the full rail voltage to the speaker output terminal. If you've ever seen a damaged amp that pushed or pulled the speaker cone to its limits when the amp powered up (common on some Rockford amplifiers), that was almost certainly due to a shorted output transistor. When checking transistors, you most commonly look for shorted connections inside the transistor. You do this by using a multimeter to look for low resistance connections between the transistor's terminals.
Note:
I used the terms short and open on the previous paragraph. A short (short circuit) is a path through which current flows that should not be there. An open (open circuit) is a break in the circuit.

There are no internal fuses on any car audio Amplifier. Servicing will be required.

Dec 30, 2008 | Rockford Fosgate Punch 301X Car Audio...

1 Answer

Amp turns on just fine but no sound comes out


Amp Failure:
There are many different ways that an amp can fail but the two most common failures are shorted output transistors and blown power supply transistors (< those are not blown). There are several types of protection circuits in amplifiers. The most common are over-current and thermal. The over-current protection is supposed to protect the output transistors. Sometimes it doesn't work well enough to prevent the failure of the output transistors but it will work well enough to shut the supply down before the power supply FETs are destroyed. If the amp remains in protect mode, goes into protect mode or blows the fuse as soon as the remote voltage is applied, shorted output transistors are almost certainly the cause. If the fuse protecting the amp is too large, if the protection circuit doesn't respond quickly enough or if the power supply is poorly designed, the power supply transistors may fail. If you see a lot of black soot on the power supply transistors (near the power transformer), the power supply transistors have failed. Soot on the board doesn't necessarily mean the transistors have failed. Sometimes, technicians don't clean up the mess from a previous failure. Transistor Failure/Checking Transistors:
In general, when a transistor fails, it will either short (common for output AND power supply transistors) or open (common for power supply transistors). Transistors act like valves. They control the current flowing through a circuit. A shorted transistor acts like a valve that's stuck open (passing too much current). In the case of an output transistor, the shorted transistors tries to deliver the full rail voltage to the speaker output terminal. If you've ever seen a damaged amp that pushed or pulled the speaker cone to its limits when the amp powered up (common on some Rockford amplifiers), that was almost certainly due to a shorted output transistor. When checking transistors, you most commonly look for shorted connections inside the transistor. You do this by using a multimeter to look for low resistance connections between the transistor's terminals.

Seems as you have blown an output. Seek repairs.

Dec 29, 2008 | Power Acoustik A3000DB Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Blown fuses in a Pioneer RX-570


Hi sabackdoc

Ok, it is probably not an easy fix for a layman. It may have blown output transistors, or power supply failure. As to whether it is economic depends on what has actually failed. But if it is output transistors failed, be prepared for $130 to $170 to fix it. Probably not worth it. They are a little temperamental to fix, and I recall repairing a number of them under warranty when the were new for blown output stages. It is worth getting an estimate from someone near to you. Try and use a Pioneer agent as they have experience and access to spares. Sorry this is not a fix for you, but I hope that it turns out ok for you. :)

regards
Robotek

Aug 07, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

NAD C350


Take a ohm meter and measure resistance from emiter to collector should have a few kilo ohm on output transistor.
If no ohm meter available , remove output transistors from circuit.
note position of transistor . you have a NPN and a PNP for each channel.
Replace fuse and power up. If fuse blows check bridge in the power supply.

80% of the time output transistor burn and blow the fuse.
before replacing output transistors check driver transistors they probably burnt also

Apr 29, 2008 | NAD C350 2-Channel Amplifier

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