Question about Invicta Watches

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Hello, I was watching shopnbc and heard salesman describing winding the mainspring for automatic prodiver which I attempted as described. Screwed myself out of a working watch (lol)! Can I fix myself? Screws in and out but cant set time or date! Thank you! Loved the watch while it worked! Safedrives@aol.com Larry I

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The crown/ winder has three positions
unwind the crown nad pull out slightly is for winding the watch.
position two pull out slightly more it should adjust the date .
and then finally position three fully pulled pout will adjust the time.

If it does not do this then is possibly the winder pivots broken/faulty.

Posted on Jan 09, 2018

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Seiko Diamatic Day Date Automatic Watch No: 219050

I have a Seiko Diamatic 780632. To set the day and date, pull the crown once and wind it upwards (away from you) to set the date; winding it downwards (towards you) will set the day. To set the time, you have to pull the crown twice and wind it towards you.

Posted on Nov 14, 2007

  • 198 Answers

SOURCE: reymond weil ladies watch automatic

do u have a photgraph of ur watch... it wil be easier for us to make it out

Posted on Jun 12, 2008

Accelet
  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: Steinhausen watch adjustment?

To set time, you need to unscrew crown anti-clockwise direction if you have a screw-in crown watch. You need to softly and slowly pull the crown out a little bit. The best way to do this is to use first and second finger and use finger knuckle as a lever in order to pull the crown out with as little force as possible. You can feel a little "click"! Now you can set the time by turning it anti-clockwise. This would turn the minute-hour hands forward until you set the right time. When time is set, push the button back and screw the crown clockwise for a few rounds to ensure it is screwed back tight.

Posted on Nov 13, 2009

  • 2501 Answers

SOURCE: the winding stem came out when i was trying to set time formula 1

I would advise you to take it to an authorised dealer (see the Tag Heuer web site (www.tagheuer.com) ) and let them sort out why the stem came out. I feel sure that this shouldn't happen and it is likely that a repair is needed.

(It may be that something that restricts the movement of the stem has become detached. If this is so, then something may be moving about inside).

Posted on Feb 11, 2010

escapement
  • 2334 Answers

SOURCE: Bought this Russian Diver 7003 from ShopNBC about 2

Hard to fix for people without watchmaking knowledge. I'd do that in 15 minutes. Anyway - Invicta is NOT even the average quality watch company, so, can NOT charge you more than price of watch. Contact me: artkalnins@yahoo.co.uk This will be long explanation, but , hopefully you will get it right.

Posted on Mar 05, 2010

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1 Answer

Everytime my self winding runs down, why do I spend hours trying to get started again?


An automatic watch receives it power from the mainspring, which is wound by hand (most watches) and from movement of the arm which causes the Oscillating Weight to spin around and wind the mainspring. The problem is that it takes many, many rotations of the weight to put enough winds on the mainspring to keep it going. If you have not worn the watch for 24 hours you need to put initial winds on the mainspring, either by turning the crown or by swinging the watch around 30-40 times. If the watch is in good mechanical condition, once you put the initial winds on it, you can put it on your wrist and it should run overnight if taken off. Most older Seiko watches cannot be wound by hand.

Nov 24, 2015 | Watches

1 Answer

Winder for automatic watch


When you wind it manually (forward or clockwise) it winds the mainspring. Only need to watch it 5 or 6 times if it's completely stopped you wearing it will do the rest. If you going to get a automatic winder get one that will wind in both directions. It will give a few revolutions clockwise and then we'll go reverse counterclockwise.
Hope this answers your questions thank you.

Jun 06, 2015 | Bulova Mens Marine Star - 98B209 Watches -...

2 Answers

Self whinder starts then stops after a couple of seconds ???


If you have had it for a good while, it probably needs a cleaning. And a little lube to keep it ticking.

Apr 30, 2014 | Rotary Watches

1 Answer

I have wound muy omega speedmaster automatic to tightly at the bezel and it has stopped working. Can you tell me if there is something inside that can be released tostart it again?


There's a misconception that mechanical watches can be "overwound." Mainsprings in old watches can indeed set in place and freeze up if they are wound tightly and not permitted to unwind, but the steel used in modern mainsprings used in the past 50 years or so is an alloy that's much less likely to bind up compared to 19th century pocket watches. In addition, the winding mechanism in an automatic (aka, self-winding) watch is designed to slip once the spring has been fully wound so that the rotor and winding parts aren't damaged by suddenly binding up. In a manual wind watch, once the mainspring is fully wound, it's simply not possible to wind the watch further unless the mainspring snaps or comes loose from its anchoring--in which case, you'd be able to wind the watch forever without ever storing power in the mainspring to drive the movement. While it is possible for a watchmaker to open your watch and release tension on the mainspring, it's overwhelmingly likely that something entirely different is keeping your watch from ticking and keeping time.

Mechanical watches generally stop running for two reasons: (1) lack of power to the movement; or (2) something in the movement that is preventing the movement from running. If your mainspring is fully wound, you have power to drive the movement. It's time to think about what could be causing #2.

Problems in the movement are usually caused by dust or dirt that preventing a delicate movement part from working properly (e.g., dirt at the pivots can freeze up a gear, stopping a movement). However, it's also possible to have a mechanical failure, such as a bent tooth on a gear in the train. A further possibility is so-called "overbanking," which some believe is the origin of the myth of overwinding. A mechanical watch's balance assembly drives a tiny little forked lever back and forth to control the escapement and the rate at which the watch keeps time. If the watch receives a physical shock or if the parts are worn, it's possible for this tiny lever to get bumped out of its tiny pivot and jammed in place. When that happens, the watch will stop, even though a superficial check will seem to indicate that the balance is still moving freely. At the same time, because the watch isn't ticking, the mainspring isn't unwinding, and so the watch cannot be wound further.

In my experience, watches usually stop running due to dirt at the pivots or on one or more gear teeth. I generally see overbanking in older watches or mechanical watches that have been less precisely made and not routinely cleaned over their working lives--though I have seen it also occur in a few newer watches that were dropped. Better designed watches--and I would include Omega in this category--have escapement levers with built-in guards to make it more difficult for them to overbank.

As for how dirt gets into a watch that's supposed to be water-resistant and generally sealed against exactly that problem--well, as odd as it sounds, watches "breathe," and this process draws in dust and dirt over time. Worn against the body, a watch warms up and expands the air inside it, pushing some of it out of the case; upon cooling, some air is drawn back into the case. This process is obviously reduced in watches designed with a significant degree of water resistance (aka 50 meters or more), but the process is accelerated when you pull the stem out to set the time or even wind the watch via the stem--there's some degree of air gap between the stem and the stem tube, or else it wouldn't be possible to turn the stem. This microscopic dust--in minute quantities--mixes with the lubricating oils inside a mechanical watch and increase the friction in some of the key pivots. Over time, the combination of naturally solidifying oils that are thickening and a minute amount of dust can turn lubricating oil into glue. The watch cleaning process flushes the old oil and accumulated dirt from the pivot bushings so that fresh, uncontaminated oil can be used to re-lubricate these key gear axles.

Bottom line: if your mechanical watch has stopped working, it's much more likely that something is interrupting the intricate gears in the watch movement rather than a problem with the mainspring. A competent watchmaker or watch repair technician should be able to identify the problem relatively quickly and give you a definitive answer as to the true cause of--and cost to fix--your watch.

Jun 11, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

Watch will not wind and will not run or keep time. It appears to have over wound itself.


Not possible. The assumption that a watch is fully wound and then doesn't run is because the watch is over wound is invalid. The correct assumption is the watch has been fully wound and the watch has a problem. Could be anything. Automatic winding watches have a mainspring that slips or acts as a clutch when fully wound to avoid breaking from continuous winding.

May 23, 2011 | Stuhrling Emperor Watch

1 Answer

My automatic omega watch stops after 20-24 hours eventhough i am promised it should last for 48hours if worn continuously for 48 hours.


Almost all automatic wristwatches made today have an 18-24 hour "power reserve" when fully wound. A 24 hour reserve is actually very, very good. I can't think of a modern self-winding wristwatch that has a 48-hour power reserve because that would require a super-long or much larger mainspring than would fit in a modern watch movement / case. There may be some hand-crafted or super-premium watches that can do this, but only a very select few.
Manual wind railroad pocket watches, which were some of the finest and most accurate mechanical watch movements ever made, generally had a 40-hour power reserve. That extra capacity was created by using a large mainspring to store the extra energy. These mainsprings could be used because of the much larger size of these watches, compared to modern wristwatches.
If you are concerned about keeping your watch ticking, even when you're not wearing it, you might want to look at a "watch winder"--basically, a small watch case that rotates the watch for you, keeping the automatic winding rotor moving and the watch ticking. In addition, sitting at a computer all day will wind your watch much less than walking and otherwise moving around. Even though you're wearing your watch, if you're not moving, you're not winding it.

May 09, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

My Omega DeVille, after winding it it will only run for about 1-2 min, I placed back on the winder for 8 hrs. and it will not move. I can swing the watch and get the same results. It will only operate...


I will assume this is an automatic. In which case it sounds like the mainspring has broken. You will need to get a qualified watchmaker to fix that. There can be other reasons (blocked wheels etc) but this is the most common to cause the symptom you describe.

Sep 24, 2010 | Omega DeVille 4730.31 Wrist Watch

1 Answer

How do you get started to wind a BMW watch. There is no resistance when I wind the crown. There does nt seem to be any plastic or anything in the way. I ve set the date successfully. Its a BMW Chrono...


mcdevito75 here, BMW watch, nice watch, Actually there are 2 ways to start winding an automatic or self wind watch. Since you feel no resistance in the winder (crown) which if you did, would mean the automatic mechanism is attached by gear to the mainspring and winding the crown (stem) would start the winding process. Without any resistance winding the crown, your automatic mechanism is free-lance as a way of saying, in your watch which simply means your BMW watch winds solely on wrist / arm motion. First, make sure you hear the automatic mechanism moveing inside the watch when you move the watch in almost any direction, now simply hold the watch in your hand and with a rocking motion, say from 12--to 6 rock your hand back and forth for about 30 seconds. You can also make circular motions with the watch in your hand for 30 seconds, any motion that will cause the automatic movement in your watch to move will, start the winding process. After you see you watch has started, simply wear your watch to keep it wound.

Jul 31, 2010 | Bulova Watch

1 Answer

Need a manual describing how to set the date for an Invicta Reserve Subaqua 6208


mcdevito75 here, Best Bet, online to shopnbc.com to Invicta watches, or give Invicta a call , info at the website at ShpNBC.com

Jul 03, 2010 | Invicta Reserve Collection Subaqua Noma...

1 Answer

Submariner Winding Slips


crowbar040, you may have a problem with your mainspring click, which is supposed to keep the spring coiled as it winds. What might be happening is it is sticking and coming undone instead of winding. Or you could have a bad gear in your automatic.

Apr 28, 2008 | Rolex Daytona 116520 Wrist Watch

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