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Can I replace a 15 or 20 amp circuit breaker with a larger amp breaker? I am wanting to install window refrigerated air conditioners and they require a 15 amp breaker, but I won't be able to use the outlet for anything else.

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Only if you have the room for it, by don't over amp that circut, the breaker than will be to large to do it's job, be careful doing this

Posted on Nov 09, 2010

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The breaker keep tripping


When you get a new air-conditioner it should be standard practice to call an electrician and have a designated plug installed with its own breaker that has been calculated with the correct wire size and amperage for the breaker. When you use a common plug that may already have 5 or 10 amps being used on that circuit and you add a 12 or 14 amp appliance to the system you are going to have troubles.

Nov 29, 2013 | LG Goldstar GWHD5000 wall/window Air...

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Wire wont fit in new coleman breakers


Hi - I'm an electrican and would like to help.

If the wire you're trying to install on a circuit breaker doesn't fit - then something is wrong. Typically, circuits are designed around the amount of voltage and current a product requires. The voltage determines the combination of material & thickness of the insulation on the wire and the the amount of current (in amps) determines the size of the conductor or wire. The appropriate circuit protection (fuse or circuit breaker) is selected to protect the circuit from trying to deliver more current than the product requires (in the case of a fault, etc.) which would cause the wire to over heat and potentially cause a fire. So, if the product requires (for simplicity) 120 volts and 20 amps, a wire is selected with the proper insulation for 120 volts or more and conductor sized to carry no less than 20 amps. Aluminum and copper is expensive, so providing larger sizes than needed is a waste of resources and money. A #12 copper wire is suitable for this amount of amps. A circuit breaker rated for 20 amps is chosen. A 20 amp circuit breaker must be able to accept a wire capable of 20 amps - other wise it's not really a 20 amp circuit breaker. Most circuit breakers are designed to accept LARGER wires than needed - because often times circuits will need a wire that is one or two sizes larger due to the length of the circuit (how far the product is from the electrical panel).

If you're seeing a circuit breaker that will not accept the wire, the circuit breaker is probably the wrong size (and if you could force the wire in it - it would probably trip instantly when turned on) or someone has made a very expensive blunder when chosing the wire type and size for the circuit.

If the the latter is the case, simply connect a short length of the correct size wire to the oversized wire in an appropriate connector and secure to the circuit breaker terminal screw. otherwise, have a qualified person evaluate the situation. Be smart. Be safe.

Feb 22, 2013 | Electric Circuit Breaker Kit for Furnace

1 Answer

I have a new furnace and the breaker keeps tripping (20/30). It is a bryant westinghouse box. I think 200 amphes


1) You got a FIRE truck coming.

2) Wire is too small.
Problem is NOT circuit breaker.

3) Both 240Volt appliances on same breaker is a hazard, especially if space available in 200 amp service panel for more breakers.

4) Usually each 240V appliance has separate breaker.

5) Circuit breaker trips because of High heat on the wire.
If wire gets hot, it will start a fire inside the wall.

Electric code requires wire-size match breaker-size.

6) If you put larger amp breaker on same wire that is getting hot, then wire will get hotter.
Result: FIRE truck middle of night with folks jumping out window in glass-cut bare run across yard.

7) Each appliance has volts and watt rating on label.
EVERY appliance has label.

8) For example stove might be rated 8000 watts and 240Volt.
8000 watts divided by 240 volts = 33.3 amps
Stove would require 40 amp breaker and 8 gauge wire.

9) How to figure it out:
http://waterheatertimer.org/Color-codewire.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-install-a-subpanel.html

10) Do same calculation for new furnace.
12000 watt furnace divided by 240 volts = 50 amps.
Use 60 amp breaker and 6 gauge wire.

11) Summary: fixya wants you to be safe, and buy stuff showing in the ads.
Use a bigger breaker ONLY when bigger wire is also installed.
Call furnace installer, the installer should know to check safe wiring before installing.

Nov 04, 2012 | Bryant Westinghouse Bqc Quad Circuit...

1 Answer

Air conditioner fuses-do they go in pointed in the same direction


Hi Giovanni - I'm an electrician and can help you with your question.

Fuses are designed to fit specific holders so that they aren't accidentally installed into the wrong holder. This is accomplished by manufacturing fuses that rely on differences in length, diameter, blades, notches, tabs, etc.as determined by the voltage and range of current in amps that the circuit needs. We would never want to install a 100 amp fuse in a holder for a circuit designed to be protected by a 15 amp fuse. As a result, you can not physically install a 100 amp fuse in a fuse holder designed to hold a 15 amp fuse and vice-versa.

The notches like the one on the 250V 40A fuse below do the same thing as described above. The fuse should require only enough force to seat into the spring loaded clamps. Larger fuses require more pressure than smaller sizes. Sometimes, the fuse will fit either way - but this is not always the case. I usually install them so that the label is right-side up - if it doesn't like that orientation, simply flip the fuse. The electrical rating does not change - regardless of position.

I hope this helps & good luck!

May 28, 2012 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I'm replacing my gas furnace with a ac/heater unit that uses 240 voltage and want to know how many volts my furnace uses


If it's a 240 volt system, the maximum voltage required is 240 volts. Which would be what the furnace needs/uses to operate properly. But, I suspect what you really wanted to know is what is the amperage that's used/required. In most installations, it requires to 60 amp circuit breakers. However, yours may require less or more. Check the installation manual for more specific requirements.

Apr 04, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Where is the fuse/breaker on a goodman cple 18-1


Hi, I wanted to look up the numbers you gave me as you listed 2 different model numbers, the CPLE-18-1 is a 1&1/2 remote condenser and the other you showed CPLE-24-1 is a 2 ton unit. Doesn't matter, but if your power was lost you have your main breaker box at your meter, and at the condenser you will have a disconnect box with a pull out type plug. If you see no fuses, try removing the plastic cover as they are required to install 2-fuses in side the box also. If this is a split system with the outdoor and indoor unit, you will also have a breaker inside for the indoor unit, its high voltage and you will have a circuit board in the indoor unit with a 3 to 5 amp auto type plug in fuse.
I hope this has helped you out on this. I will be here if you have more questions. Please do not forget to rate me as I know you will be kind. Keep me posted.
Sincerely,
Shastalaker7
A/C, Heating, & Refrigeration Contracted

Aug 08, 2010 | Goodman CPLE24-1 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

My amana ac unit over heats the circuit breaker and trips it off after running for about 15 minutes. It will not blow the fuses on the outside disconnect next to the unit outside.


What you described 'shouldn't' be happening - "if" the outside fuses and the inside breaker are sized correctly for your air conditioner.

I would make sure that the fuses in your outside disconnect were the proper size (for your AC), and that the inside breaker was of suffienct size to handle the air conditioner, and whatever else might be on the circuit.

Note: You would never want the 'outside fuse size' to be bigger than the inside breaker.

For example: 50 amp fuses in the outside disconnect and a 40 amp inside breaker is a no-no.

Often, for whatever reasons - someone will put larger fuses in the outside disconnect than what is called for.

When this happens the inside breaker is the only safety on the AC.

The problem is - for whatever reason - your inside breaker should not be tripping off.

It's likely that the AC may be on a inside breaker "that also has other things i.e. dryer, electric range or Refrigerator," and therefore any of these components 'including' the air conditioner could be causing the inside breaker to 'trip.'

One way to check this would be to 'un-plug' whatever else you had on the inside breaker - and then run your air conditioner and see if the breaker trips. Let's say you have the refrigerator and the air conditioner on the same inside breaker. You suspect the refrigerator is causing the inside breaker to trip - so you unplug it - and then turn on the air conditioner. "Now" it does not trip the inside breaker and assuming you have the proper fuses in the outside disconnect - you could safely say the air conditioner is ok - but - the refrigerator might be on the blink.

It's also possible that you just have too much on the inside breaker and you need to plug the refrigerator in to another outlet.

Still, if it was me - I think I would really think 'hard' about calling a Service Tech out - and let him/her diagnose the problem.

Hope this helps.



Jun 12, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Exact same thing happened to me


the 20 amp circuit should more than handle a 6.5 amp load, the 6.5 is the rating of the operating AC not of the circuit that is required to be attached to it. If the "pop" noise is the breaker tripping the circuit may be miswired, the unit mayhave a short to ground, as the circuit breaker is designed to trip on an over amp situation or a situation where 20 amps is exceeded. Di you verify that the circuit voltage id correct, eg: 220 volt or 110 volts. and that it matches the unit nameplate.

Jul 20, 2009 | Goldstar KG6000R Window Air Conditioner

2 Answers

Circuit breaker overheating on rooftop ac after


Possible overcharge or bad breaker. You need to check the amp draw for the unit. If you draw under full load amps and trips breaker breaker is bad.Rus

Jul 13, 2009 | Dometic Rooftop RV Air Conditioner

1 Answer

GFI on cord trips out.


Probable cause is a single pole gfi opposed to a double pole gfi.
* Do not use a single pole GFCI ON A MULTI WIRE CIRCUIT, IT WILL NUISANCE TRIP IMMEDIATELY
Use a two pole GFCI circuit breaker on such circuits.

May 20, 2009 | LG LWHD1800R Wall/Window Air Conditioner

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