Question about Bushnell BANNER RIFLE SCOPEPower: 3-9X40 / Reticle: Green/Red Illuminated

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My elevation is not working, I am on at 25 ids but at 100 I am high about 12 inches. When I adjust my elevation it does not move , the bullet hits the same place. I have a bushel 3 by 9 . Help no time before the season

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You need a shim to put under your scope base. Brownell's sale the kits for them.

Posted on Apr 02, 2011

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My rifle is shooting about five inches high. Do I turn the elevation adjustment towards "up" or opposite of "up"?


If you have a scope, the adjustment is under the top cap, and you should turn the adjustment 'down'. If you have iron sights, you would adjust the rear sight in the same direction that you want to move the bullet on the target (also 'down'). The opposite is true if you are adjusting the front sight.

Dec 26, 2014 | Optics

1 Answer

Sight in


Depends totally on the ammunition you use. It will be markedly different for a light loaded heavy bullet .38 special as compared to a fast light bullet .357. The difference could be measured in feet rather than inches at 100 yards.

There are several ballistics programs on the internet that will help you with this, but you need to know things like bullet speed, ballistic coefficient, distance, etc. to use them effectively. Something as simple as a call to the ammunition manufacturer could answer your question quickly. Just ask them the drop of the bullet at 25 and 100 yards and adjust your sights using that information.

Mar 29, 2014 | Optics

1 Answer

Leupold VX II 3x9x50mm scope on a rem. 270. One year old. Worked fine last year. Sighted in last week at range. Windage was dead on. Wanted to move up 1 inch in hieght at 25 yards. Tried to adjust hieght...


16 clicks is about 4" at 100 yards not 25. did you try shooting it at 100 yards? remember the scope is mounted at least an inch and probably higher than that above the barrel. at close range you will always hit low with a scope because the bullet has to climb at least an inch or more before it will be right on at 25 yards. if it is dead on at 25 it should hit way high at 100. (or the scope/ mounts are bad).

Nov 05, 2010 | Leupold ® Rifleman® 3-9x50 mm Scope

2 Answers

I inadvertantly changed my elevation adsjustment.


this is an excellent article on zeroing a scope.

http://www.outdoorpros.com/How-To-Guides/How-To-Zero-A-Rifle-Scope/5

Apr 06, 2010 | BSA ® 2 - 7x32 A/O Sweet 17?? Rifle Scope

2 Answers

Windage and elevation not working barska 8-32*50mm


I doubt if there is anything wrong with your scope.
The Baraska model A10810 Reticle adjustments are 1/8 ( 1/8 inch) MOA (minute of angle).
For instance, Look at the top turret (The ELEVATION Adjustment Knob). You will see that there are little vertical 'hashmarks' all the way around the knob starting with a '0' then a series of the verticle hashmarks, then a '1' and another series of the marks, then a '2' and so on. YOUR scope will have 8 of those vertical 'hashmarks' between each 'number'. These little 'hashmarks are referred to as 'Clicks' or 'Minute of Angle' adjustments.
Now imagine that you are set up on the 100 yard line and you have fired a round at your target, say a one inch diameter dot or any size for that matter, and the bullet strike was one (1) inch LOW and two (2) inches to the RIGHT and of course you now want your next round to impact in the target dot.
To bring your bullets point of impact UP to coincide with your point of aim (you have your 'crosshairs or RETICLES centered on the dot), you will be turning the TOP adjustment knob CLOCKWISE, ONE 'click' at a time. EACH one of those 'Clicks' will actually move the horizontal Reticle UP (Elevation) or DOWN 1/8 of an inch at a time. If the bullets point of impact was 1 inch LOW, you would need to turn the adjustment knob clockwise Eight (8) clicks which will equal ONE (1) inch.
Now you must adjust the knob on the RIGHT side of the scope. This one is the WINDAGE Adjustment knob which controls the VERTICAL Reticle and moves the point of impact Right or Left. This knob will also have the 'hashmark' increments around its perimeter and like the Elevation knob each 'Click' will move the Reticle 1/8 of an inch but in this case the Reticle and point of impact moves Right or Left.
Remember the bullets point of impact was 2 inches to the RIGHT. This means you must adjust the Reticle or point of impact to the LEFT so that your point of impact will coincide with your point of aim and will be in the target dot. Turn the adjustment knob COUNTER CLOCKWISE Sixteen (16) Clicks. Keeping your POINT of AIM (crosshairs centered on the dot), your next round should be inside the dot and you can then fine tune it from there.
As you can see from this example, the Reticle (crosshairs)and point of impact does not travel very far at all inside your scope at the 100 yard distance so it is not hard to imagine that you thought they were not adjusting to get you on target, when in fact they WERE adjusting, but in tiny increments.
Now, as you create more distance between you and your target, these 'tiny' increments and point of impact will be larger as your distance increases. For example, at 200 YARDS each 'click' will move your Point Of Impact 1/4 of an inch right,left,up, or down. So if your bullet point of impact was one (1) inch low from the 200 yd line you would adjust your Elevation Reticle 4 Clicks to raise your point of impact in order to be on target. At the 300 yd line each Click will adjust the point of impact up,down,right or left, ONE (1) inch.
If you wish, I would be happy to walk you through the 'ZEROing In' of your scope and rifle even if you do not have a Zero Bore Scope. With-in about 9 rounds you can be hitting where you are aiming instead of 'chasing' bullet holes all over the paper.
If you are interested, respond back and I will be glad to assist you. Enjoy. :)

Apr 07, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

Crosshairs on pentax 4.5x14x42 don't move


With modern rifle scopes the crosshairs do not move.They are designed so that the crosshairs are always centered.I have not seen a scope with crosshairs that move for about 40 years.If your scope has 1/4 minute clicks, then the strike of the bullet moves 1/4 inch at 100 yards for every click.1 inch for 4 clicks and so on.If you rifle shoots 6 inches high at 100 yards you should turn it down 24 clicks to strike dead on.Many hunters and shooters adjust their scopes to strike 1 1/2 inches high at 100 yards.Then it will be accurate to about 300 yards without further adjustment.

Feb 15, 2009 | Pentax 4.5X-14X 42mm Pioneer Matte Rifle...

2 Answers

I have a Bushnell Sprotiew 4x, 15mm scope mounted on a Mossburg .22 rifle. My shots are hitting left six inches and low. Can you please tell me how to adjust this scope? Thank you.


Keep in mind Diane this is for a set distance. if you are taking a shot at a target further than your are set for (ie a target you wont get 3 shots @) remember how the bullet is travelling as it goes down range

one idea would be to set your rifle up down range and zero it in on a target (preferably paper) now adjust 1 MOA (try and have target @ 100 yards and 200 yards)

see how far the bullet moves for each moa adjustment. then check it against the next range.

this should remain constant @ a set number of inches per 100 yards.

so if you zero in @ 100 yards and then move 1 moa any direction and it adjusts (lets say and hope it is 1.047 inches") then you do the same for 200 yards. it should be twice as much movement. ie 2.094"

once you know what 1 moa represents on your scope you can adjust alot more accurately.

REMEBER the total inches of movement / adjustment per MOA is directly related to range (a precise range helps in shooting) so if your squirrel is 150 yards and your first shot is off 9" to adjust you divide 9" by the inches per moa so 1.5 (150 yards /100) X (Inches per 100 yards per moa you measured hopefully 1.047") its 9" divided by 2x1.047 = 9" / 2.094 = 4.29799

this number needs to be rounded to the nearest click on your scope (most are 1/4 MOA scopes and you can tell by looking at how many clicks/lines are inbewteen each large number on your windage and elevation dials

so to turn this into an adjustment we round 4.29799 to 4.25 which is 4.25 MOA or 17 clicks on a 1/4 min scope.

GL and any questions just post and ill help

not please rate this as fixya :)

Note i can provide EXACT information that would allow you to determine range, and windage and elevation adjustments by looking through scope and estimating range
then factoring in weather variables. NOTE you hafta enjoy math or just want to know how to shoot really well. :)


Dec 22, 2008 | Barska Optics Barska 10-40x50 Ao Varmint...

2 Answers

Lost manual for trophy scope 3-9x40 rifle


There is no manual for elevation and windage adjustments. (at least not one that comes with your scope; all your scopes manual will say is whether its FFP or SFP (First Focal Plane or Second Focal Plane, the scale used on your scope for mil dots)(you can get this info by finding a store that sells this scope and asking a sales rep)

To adjust for elevation and windage you have to take into account the daily factors (unless your shooting in the same indoor environmental controlled shooting range each day you SNOB! jk

The formula takes alot of variables into account and is known as Exterior Ballistics

!) Environmental Factors - First thing you account for.

A) Elevation from sea level plays a large part into your environmental adjustments. Your elevation from sea level determines largely the Barometirc Pressure but it also varies slightly with Temp and Humidity (Major Factor)

B) Temperature - The temperature can affect the density of the air. The hotter it is the thinner it is and therefore less resistance and a higher bullet trajectory (Minor Factor)

C) Humidity - This again will affect the densify of the air infront of your bullet (Minor Factor)

D) Barometric Pressure - The other large factor in air density this is the base stat that the others modify

These all combined create a ratio that you apply to standard MOA (windage and elevation adjustments) to obtain the shooting information for that particular environment)



2) Bullet Factors (Listed on the Box you buy) - There are a few bullet factors to take into account.

A) Speed - the bullets feet per second can vary as much or more than 500 feet per second with the
same caliber ammunition.
B) Grain - The Grain of an ammunition is a measure fo its "Sectional Density" or weight to volume
ratio
C) Ballistic Co Efficient - This number is the measure of the bullets ability to maintain its speed
during flight. This also varies from Grain to Grain


These factors are complex and a pain for the best of shooters to determine. adding to that confusion. there are many ways to determine a bullets ballistics coefficient and each one gets a different number. In this case bullet data is best retieved from the manufactuerers box and take their word for it.

3) Lastly you account for shot factors.

A) Range - by referencing your standard elevation MOA adjustments and mutliplying by the ratio for environment the Elevation MOA is achieved.


B) Windage - Windage is done in inches per mile per hour then is multiplied by the Mph of the wind.
In order to be precise the windage is done in inches instead of MOA. it needs to be converted heres and example.

You Ballistics Cheat Sheet for the day says the windage at 900 yards is 5.2 Inches per mph of wind.
you apply the ratio for your environment .90 (all example numbers. this number would represent a shooting environment with an air density lower than standard/ the cheat sheet's known MOA adjustments). the 5.2 inches is multiplied by .9to acheive 4.68?? idk the point is you mulitply that by the wind of 10 mph to achieve a total of 46.8" of wind drift to the target.

now for the conversion to MOA. 1 MOA is eqaul to 1.047" per 100 yards. meaning for every 1 moa you adjust the bullet will move 1.047" per 100 yards (our target is 900 yards; meaning that each MOA for this target is 9*1.047" = 9.423" per MOA adjustment. so take that number and divide our total wind drift by it. ie 46.8 / 9.423 = MOA Windage Change of 4.9665... now you need to know whethere your scope is 1/4 minute clicks or 1/8 minutes (how many spaces between large numbers?) you would adjust to 5 MOA for a 1/4 minutes scope equaling 20 clicks on an 1/8th minute scope it would be 40 clicks.

This is the math of shooting. to learn how go to
WWW.shooterready.com they are an excellent sight to get the math down WITHOUT wasting ammo. Once you have the math you an transfer it to your gun. waste a few rounds checking it out and youll be hitting targets @ 1800 yards in no time

I like to take the simple way after i learned how to do the hard way

There is software tha will do the exterior calcualtions for you.

if your interested i use Sierra Infinity V6 Ballistics Software

GL


Dec 08, 2008 | Bushnell Trophy 3-9x40 Rifle Scope, Matte...

1 Answer

Sighting in, clicks don't move where they're supposed to.


Ja, it's 1/4 M.O.A, so at 25 yards/meter it'll be ca 3 inches. You may have gone in the wrong direction. That is, if it was 3' high, and you went another 3 higher then you'd be at the top of the paper. Probably you've got it figured out by now.

The easiest, fastest, cheapest way to zero is with a rifle rest you can clamp your scope into, or alternatively somehow immobilize your rifle some other way. You take a shot, at 25 yards or so. It makes a hole. You now immobilize the rifle, via your rest or heavy sandbags, with the scope pointing exactly where you aimed before. You now, carefully and without moving the rifle/scope off of the point of aim, dial your reticle to point at the actual bullet hole. Your next shot will be at your point of aim now. So you just put it at the right height above your point of aim at 100 yards now.

Nov 02, 2008 | Bushnell ® Elite® 3200 3 - 9x40 mm...

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