Question about Gateway E-2000 Deluxe PC Desktop

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Hard Drives I had an extra hard drive installed in this machine, for storage space, and I've lost access to it. The new drive was designated as F:. I was trying to re-partition the drives on the main disk (C:) to merge D: and E:. In the process the floppy drive was renamed F:. Now I can't figure out how to access the new hard drive and add it to the partitions on the C: drive. The guy who installed the new hard drive had to setup a network path (I think) and I would like to do that, or whatever it takes to gain access to this extra hard drive with all my records on it. This drive came from a Micron Millenia Lxa (or Lxr) with Intel Pentium for Windows 95. It was installed in the cabinet of my Gateway 2000 GP6-233 with Intel Pentium II running Windows 98

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You should be able to see the drive under either my computer in windows explorer.

Posted on Jun 14, 2008

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I have had an Evesham PC desktop computer since 2002. I use Windows XP. Is there any possibility of downloading Windows 8? Annie


You might need to upgrade a few hardware items first also you might upgrade to vista then windows 8
Creating a new partition on your hard drive gives your future version of Windows 8 a place to live on your drive.
Knowing exactly how much space the OS requires helps you determine how large to make your partition.
Size requirements don't tell the entire story on their own, though.
Other factors like drive type and additional storage help ensure you get the best Windows 8 experience where your hard drive is concerned.

Size Requirements

Both Windows 7 and Windows 8 have the same system requirement regarding hard drive space, so if your hard drive can handle Windows 7, Windows 8 shouldn't be a problem.
For 32-bit versions of the operating system, you'll need at least 16 GB of available disk space. The 64-bit version requires 20 GB.
Your partition will have to be at least one of these sizes, depending on your OS version.
The PC Advisor website warns that these are literally the bare minimum requirements, and using these figures leaves you hardly any space to save files and install apps or programs.
Size Recommendations
You'll get more out of Windows 8 if the operating system has enough free space for you to install your favorite programs and apps.
PC World calls this extra space "breathing room," suggesting you give your Windows 8 partition at least 30 to 40 GB.
If you're dual-booting with another operating system or you're accustomed to keeping excess data on a separate partition, 30 to 40 gigabytes should be fine.
If you'd rather have all your songs, videos and PC games on the same partition as the operating system, consider giving it substantially more space.
Solid State Drive
Windows 8 works on traditional hard drives with spinning disks, but it's optimized to run on a solid state drive.
If you've got an SSD, consider putting your Windows 8 partition on that drive.
While any operating system benefits from the speed increase an SSD brings, ARS Technica specifically recommends this drive type for Windows 8, saying the operating system's "tablet-esque feel and search-heavy usage model will be much better served by solid-state storage."
Other Requirements
Hard drive space is a crucial system requirement, but others are just as important.
Ensuring your computer meets the other requirements before partitioning your drive for Windows 8 saves trouble in case your computer can't handle the OS.
You'll need at least a 1 GHz processor that support PAE, SSE2 and NX.
Your computer has to have at least 1 GB of RAM for 32-bit Windows 8, or 2 GB for 64-bit.
Your graphics card must be at least a DirectX 9-capable card with a WDDM driver. Also, while you're formatting your drive, format the Windows 8 partition in the NTFS format.
Storage Spaces
Storage Spaces is a useful Windows 8 feature when you're working with multiple drives and partitions.
The tool enables you to group drives into one larger storage space so you don't have to constantly switch partitions and explore different drives.
For example, if you create a storage space between two 32 GB flash drives, you'd be able to access it as if it were one larger 64 GB drive.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-8/system-requirements
Microsoft windows 8 system requirements
http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/features/windows/3358892/windows-8-system-requirements/
PC World windows 8 system requirements
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2012847/how-to-master-storage-spaces-in-windows-8.html
PC World how to master storage space windows 8
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/download-shop

Sep 11, 2013 | Evesham PC Desktops

Tip

How back up your files (data) before doing system restore


<p>1. Use of pre-installed backup tools. Many computers have a backup software installed when you buy (including Time Machine backup and restore for Mac or Windows). These tools are designed to transfer files to various media they create on the computer hard drive or external hard drive, you can prevent a total loss of data is performed. When you open the utility, follow the onscreen instructions to complete the backup. <br /> <p><br /> <p>2. Back up important files on a USB stick or Memory Stick. Insert the stick into a USB port on your computer. Drag the selected files to the disk icon on the desktop (Mac) or PC (Windows) will appear. Flash drives and memory sticks are very mobile and can be stored in small spaces such as basements. Although they generally do not have a capacity of more than a few gigabytes (GB), they are large enough to store your important files. <br /> <p><br /> <p>3. Enter an external hard drive. These external hard drives usually have a very large capacity and can therefore keep most or all files on a disk. Connect the external hard drive via a USB port. You can drag and drop files on your hard disk or use it as a means of backup using a backup utility installed. <br /> <p><br /> <p>4. Burn your important files on a CD-R or DVD-R. an entire hard disk backup can be many slices, so this option is ideal if you want large media files or documents for easy access later. Insert the CD into the CD-ROM and follow the instructions on the screen (for Windows and Mac) to back up and store files. <br /> <p><br /> <p>5. Upload files for storage in the cloud. Services in the Internet cloud storage (like Mozy and drop-down box) are great ways to backup files to the internet access from any Internet enabled device. Important files with sensitive information may only be attached to a back-up cloud services such as Mozy. Clouds, Drop box is ideal for backing up photos, videos and other files less sensitive.<br />

on Jun 21, 2011 | PC Desktops

Tip

PC Tools- Maintaining Your Computer's Performance


<span style="font-weight: bold;">Maintenance Tips for Maximum Performance</span><br />With the amount of information available for download on the internet, it's easy to quickly fill up your valuable hard drive space and turn your computer into a sluggish, unresponsive monster. Keeping your hard drive clean is essential to the high performance that the latest computers can achieve. Fortunately, it's a simple process; one that can easily be performed on a regular basis and, with some organization, keep your computer running like a well-oiled machine.<br /><br />You can discover how much hard drive space is available on your computer by accessing the DriveSpace program in your System Tools. A pie graph will show you the amount of used and unused space for each of your drives. Check this often to keep an idea of how much space you are using.<br /><br />There are six simple steps to clearing up your hard drive:<br /><br />1. Uninstall unused programs.<br /><br />Many times a new program will come along that looks fun to have or play with, but after a week or two you simply stop using it. These programs clutter up your drive and take up valuable space. You might be tempted to delete these programs from your drive, but doing so will cause problems. You must use the uninstall function of Windows for the program to be removed safely and completely.<br /><br />2. Clean out temporary files.<br /><br />When your computer is not shut down properly, it will pass information from memory into fragmented files. Also, while you are running programs, your computer will write information that it does not immediately need into temporary files. Installation files will also expand themselves into the temporary folder and will not always clean up after themselves. You can delete these temporary files safely by using the Disk Cleanup option in your System Tools.<br /><br />3. Empty your internet cache.<br /><br />As you surf the internet your computer stores web pages and images into a temporary internet cache so that it can quickly recall and access information when you move back and forth between pages. This backup information can quickly add up and eat hard drive space.<br /><br />Whether you use Internet Explorer, Netscape, or one of the many other browsers available, emptying out your cache is quick and easy. Simply follow the instructions in the Help files located within those programs. You may also wish to set a specific maximum file size for your cache folder, so that it is not allowed to run rampant.<br /><br />4. Empty your mail programs of clutter.<br /><br />It's easy to browse through your email and leave old messages there, promising yourself you'll sort them out later. One or two messages don't take up much space, but hundreds certainly do. Take the time to sort through these old emails now and delete what is not important. Create folders and organize what is left. Make it a habit that when new emails come in, they are either filed immediately or thrown away. Set your email program to empty your deleted items folder each time you close your mail program.<br /><br />5. Empty your recycle bin.<br /><br />Once you've emptied your drive of cluttering, unecessary programs; empty your recycle bin to remove what has been placed there in the process.<br /><br />6. Scandisk and Defrag.<br /><br />When Windows installs programs, it will put the files it needs anywhere that it finds free space, and not directly after the last program installed. As a result, your hard drive has patches of empty space on it that are not big enough to fit a full program, and will result in a drive space error if you attempt to install something new. Scandisk your drive to check for lost file fragments and to fix any errors it finds, then Defrag to pack all of the program files together at the beginning of your drive. This will clear out those empty patches and move all of the free space you've just created to the end of your drive.<br /><br />Now that you've got it clean, keep it that way. Perform this quick maintenance routine every week. For your work computer, Friday afternoon before you leave for the weekend is the perfect time. When you return to work on Monday, you'll have a computer that is clutter-free and as responsive as it should be.<br /><br />Organize your surfing habits. Direct all of your downloads to the same folder, so that you can easily find them and delete them when necessary, or move them to zip disks for storage. Keep track of the programs that you install. For trial versions, note the date that they will expire on a calendar. This will remind you to uninstall the programs that you can no longer use rather than allowing them to clutter up your drive. Also, if you run into problems, keeping track of new downloaded and installed programs and the date they were installed can help you track down the cause of problems.<br /><br />Remember that the cleaner your hard drive is, the better your machine will respond! In order for your computer to be user friendly, it must have a friendly user. Be your computer's best friend and clean out the cobwebs regularly.

on Apr 25, 2011 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

I own a emachine w3622 and changed the hard drive. The computer reconizes the new hard drive but when I go to use the operating system disk that came with my computer says disk boot failure. Not only that...


The disk that came with your system is a recovery disk only. You will need a full installation disk from your local retailer or you can match the OS from your old HDD and use the serial key on the side/back of your machine. If you just wanted more space, install both drives and set the original one as the boot drive. the new drive, if properly installed (refer to your hdd instructions and jumper settings) you will see the second drive under "My Computer" as additional storage
GOOD LUCK AND PLEASE RATE THIS POST AS FIXYA!!

May 09, 2011 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

1 Answer

How to copy photos from PC to external hard drive?


How to Copy Files to an ExternalHard Drive

External hard drives provide great storage space for movies, music, picturesand other documents you want to keep safe over time. The drives generally comewith either USB 2.0 or Firewire connectors, so they also offer reliable datatransfers at high rates of speed. Setting the drives up is usually astraightforward process, and copying files to them from your computer is a snap.

1. Set up your external hard drive according to its instructions. The two majorsteps in setting one up are connecting it to your computer and plugging it intoan external power source. 2. Install any drivers that camewith your drive so your operating system will recognize it. If the drivers areoutdated, download and install new ones from the manufacturer's website. 3. Open the "MyComputer" panel. You'll see both your regular hard drive (the C: drive)and the external hard drive listed. 4. Double-click the externalhard drive's icon to open its window. 5. Drag and drop any files youwish to copy to the external drive into this window. 6. Right-click the "SafelyRemove Hardware" icon in the System Tray and eject the drive once you'vefinished copying your files. Read more: How to CopyFiles to an External Hard Drive ' eHow.com

Nov 10, 2010 | PC Desktops

Tip

Tips on how to buy a external or internal hard disk drive


There are so many models , makes , sizes , speeds and interfaces available these days that the decision to buy a hard drive for the average user has become a hit or miss affair. To prevent buying something totally wrong for your needs , you need to do some research on what your are handing your cash over for.

Here are the things you need to be looking at.
  1. Size of external
  2. Storage Space
  3. Cost
  4. Manufacturer
  5. Interface used
  6. Hard drive speed & Buffer Size

#1 Size of the external casing

There are basically two types of external hard drives you can choose from namely 2.5inch and 3.5inch. The 2.5 hard drive inside the casing normally goes in a laptop and the 3.5 normally goes into a desktop PC.

You should ask yourself what is your priority...Mobility or Space/Cost

If mobility and comfort of use is your main priority , you should get a 2.5inch external as they don't normally require an external power source like with a 3.5inch drive.

If hard drive space and cost is your priority , then go for the 3.5inch external. The cost per GB is about half that of a comparable 2.5inch drive but you need a external power adapter to use the drive. In general , the 3.5inch drives are faster then 2.5inch drives.

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Fig 1 - 3.5inch compared to 2.5inch hard drive

#2 Storage Space

Size is one of the main concerns when buying a new hard drive. Think about a size you would think you need in the next 6 months and double it. This will ensure that you don't (like me) buy a drive which you think you will never fill up , and fill it within a few months and have to buy another one.

Also consider what you need from your external drive. If you are going to be using your drive mostly for music backup you would need less space than for instance movies.


#3 Cost of the drive

Another thing to look at is value for money. Don't buy a 320Gb drive for $100 if you can get a 500Gb for $110. You will eventually need the extra space so look at what the next size up will cost you extra and make a decision.

For instance...A 500Gb internal hard drive would cost me $75 at the moment , but the 750Gb drive is about $85. I'd rather go for the 750Gb drive.

#4 Manufacturer

It is important to bring into consideration the manufacturer of the drive. Don't buy a drive with a unknown brand name as this will probably come back to haunt you somewhere in the future. I prefer to use Seagate and Western Digital drives as I have never had a problem with them and they carry a good warranty. There are other good drives , but I'd rather stick to what works for me. Ask around to determine what brand you should get and do google searches if you are still unsure of a particular brand.

#4 Interface available

The interface which you use to connect the drive to your computer is very important as this will govern the maximum speed which you could expect to be copying from and to the drive.

For internal drives , there are basically 3 options

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IDE - 40MB/s and connection interface is on it's way out.

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SATA - 143 MB/s

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SATA 2 - 375 MB/s

The speeds vary considerably in real world scenarios and should only be a guide.


For external drives , there are also 3 options

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USB - 25MB/s

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Firewire - 40 MB/s

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eSATA - 70 MB/s

This is real world data (not theoretical) and also should only be used as a guide as there are many factors that determine the max transfer speed.



#5 Hard drive speed & Buffer

The speed at which the drive rotates in the enclosure has a big impact on the speed which you can expect from the drive. The faster the drive rotates , the faster is will transfer data and the more expensive the drive will be. A good speed would be 7200RPM or more.

The buffer is basically the amount of ram which is physically on the hard drive's board and the more of it you have , the faster and smoother your drive will transfer data.

Here are some of the most popular hard drive manufacturer's websites so you can explore what products they offer.

Western Digital
Seagate
Maxtor (now incorporated into Seagate)
Samsung
Hitachi
Fujitsu-Siemens

That's about everything you need to know before purchasing a hard drive. Follow these steps and you should be able to make a informed decision as to what you should and should not buy.

When you have bought and want to format your drive to Fat32 , see THIS TIP

When you have bought and want to partition your drive, see THIS TIP

Please remember to rate this tip if you found it useful.

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Kind Regards
Stephan




on Feb 24, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

How to Add an Extra Hard Drive Need more storage


From what i've read, it has a SATA hard drive with it. check the PC's Motherboard. If it has an IDE slot with it, then yes you can use it. But if not, you may need to purchase a new SATA HDD to use as an extra storage for your PC. Hope this helps.

Oct 13, 2009 | HP Hewlett Packard Pavilion a1016x PC...

1 Answer

Installing secondary hard drive in a gateway 5310s


in most new cases there are extra slots for extra hard drives, but as long as the ide or sata is hooked up it should work, and you can buy hardware and rig up something ,ive tested many hard drives without hooking up hardware,
the components on the hard drive should not touch other metal

Jul 19, 2009 | Gateway 5310S PC Desktop

3 Answers

Hard drives


By D drive, do you mean a CD/DVD sort of drive or do you mean an extra hard drive (like your C drive). If you cant access a CD/DVD drive you either havnt got a disk in or the drive is faulty. If it is a hard drive (if it is new, it is not formatted, if it is old, it is faulty)
If you can see both listed in windows explorer, if you click on D what message do you get?

Mar 22, 2008 | PC Desktops

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