Question about Bushnell 675x5 EQ Reflector Telescope

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Telescope venture rx9 view blocked

I can view the moon but when i try to view a star i see the center of the object blacked out by a black disk with light around it

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  • blythestar Jun 15, 2008

    yes, i can see the moon clearly. what i see when i try to view something else like a panet or star looks like a plate is in the center with light around it, there are also 3 spots where the light around it is blacked out @ 12:00, 4:00, 8:00

  • David Duffell
    David Duffell May 11, 2010

    Hi,

    When you see the moon, Is it clearly and well focused?



    Cheers Dave

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I have this same issue. A star or planet is vlocked by a circle with 3 prongs - like the mirror holder in the tube.

Posted on Oct 19, 2009

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Can't see anything we just set it the +venture Rx-Telescope

Posted on Mar 23, 2009

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Why can I not see the difference from the sky and a star even when I allign my laser well?


It sounds like you have not adjusted the focus properly. I recommend you take your telescope outside in the daytime and point it toward a building or tree or hilltop that is somewhat distant from you. The exact distance is not important, but it should a block or more.

With the telescope pointed at the distant object, focus the telescope until the object is sharp and clear. The object might appear upside down -- that's normal for many astronomical telescopes. When you have achieved a sharp focus, leave the focus control alone until you are outside at night under the stars.

The focus should now be fairly close for viewing stars and planets. Small adjustments of the focus control may still be necessary for the sharpest view.

- Jeff

Jun 08, 2014 | Celestron NexStar 4 SE Telescope

1 Answer

Viewing


take it back where you got it for replacement

Nov 19, 2007 | Bushnell NorthStar Goto 100mm 788840...

1 Answer

Seeing the stars


The stars will always be "points in the sky" no matter what telescope.
The stars should be sharp, focused points in the center of view (more blurry towards the edges because of the stock eyepieces and the fast telescope mirror) if not, the telescope may need collimation. (look at instructions and/or search online. Plenty of instructions on the net.)
  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
  8. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  10. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects

Dec 23, 2012 | Optics

1 Answer

Celestron astromaster 114eq see only pitch black


  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
  8. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  10. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects

Dec 27, 2011 | Celestron AstroMaster 114EQ (100 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

Hi ive got a galaxsee tasco telescope but im having trouble seeing anything at night, i've took all the caps off lined up on a star but its just pitch black can you help thanks.


1. During the day, point the scope towards an object and align the finder scope to the telescope.
2. First object at night should be the moon. it will verify your finderscope alignment and you should have a clear view of the moon.
3. Use your lowest power eyepiece (largest number in mm) and point the finderscope to a star. The star should be in the center of the eyepiece.. If not, adjust the finder until it and the scope are centered.
4. You can use your higher power lens on the star nd it should still be in the FOV (field of view)
5. Scope may need to be aligned (collimated). Instructions on this should be included with the scope

Mar 10, 2011 | Tasco Galaxsee 46114375 (375 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

Hi, a few days back I purchased Nexstar 4SE. I set it up exactly how it says in the manual still I cannot see any magnifying views from the eye piece. While aligning the telescope I can find the moon from...


Stars will always appear as points. It is not possible to magnify them enough to see them as disks because they are all extremely far away. A telescope will however show you stars and other objects that are too dim to see with the naked eye.

You will be able to see the planets as disks, and even features on the planets, such as the bands on Jupiter, the rings of Saturn and the phases of Venus, and also moons around some planets. There are other objects that will show more detail when magnified, such as nebula. You will be able to see a lot of craters and other detail on the Moon.

Your problem is simply that you are not pointing the telescope at these objects. This seems to be one of those telescopes that "automatically" finds objects, but these so called "go to" scopes only do this when they are set up properly. I can't say what step(s) you have missed, but clearly even if the scope thinks it is pointed at the moon, if you can't see the moon, it is NOT pointed there. The Moon will fill the field of view even with the least powerful eyepiece. If you are seeing stars as points, then the eyepiece is focussed and working properly.

Jan 13, 2011 | Celestron NexStar 4 SE Telescope

1 Answer

I have a Meade EXT90. A black dot appears in the middle of every object I view (Jupiter, Mars, etc) with the exception of the moon. Any ideas on waht that might be? Thank you.


The black dot means you are way out of focus.

In an ETX90 Mars will always be a TINY disk, except under extreme magnification.

Jupiter is also a small disk but a little bit bigger.

Next time you try for Jupiter focus on the MOONS until they are tiny points of light like little stars.

Also certain eyepieces have this as an unwanted trait. Try another eyepiece -- start with the one with the largest number written on it which will be your LOWEST magnification.

Sep 08, 2010 | Meade ETX-90EC (325 x 90mm) Telescope

1 Answer

When viewing venus or other stars there a black spot in the center of the object. It appears to be the 2nd mirror refleting to the main miror. what have I done incorrect?


You are NOT in focus. Turn the focus knob a little until you see a perfect "disk" for the planet. Stars are always POINTS of light, with a telescope or without a telescope.

Aug 28, 2010 | Celestron NexStar 114GT (269 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

I see images in the daytime but at night complete blackness


Your scope must be pointed directly at the objects in the sky. They are very tiny, and no bigger than the tip of your finger held at arms length. Try for the moon first, and buy a good star chart like, "Sky & Telescope Pocket Star Atlas" available on amazon.com.

All telescopes have very small fields of view, 1 degree or less usually.

Also read my TIPS on my profile page.

Apr 04, 2010 | Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

1 Answer

When i view a star or small object through my reflecting telescope i can see the reflecting mirror in front of the image. this does not happen when viewing the moon.


You may need to realign the mirrors and the view piece. You can look at the mirror from the front and your eyeball should ne centered.

Aug 28, 2009 | Optics

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