Question about LG LFD790 System

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I just need a replacement "system" cable that is similar to a ribbon type cable that connects the larger bass speaker to the dvd unit. This cable powers up the whole system.

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The part you need is a LG EAD35001602. You can find them all over the internet. They aren't cheap however,


Here's one retailer.
http://www.bargains-shopping.com/product/Lg-Electronics-EAD35001602-CABLEASSEMBLY.html

Posted on Nov 03, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Can't get balance, bass and treble to work when connecting Bose Acoustimass 5II to HK AVR 525


On my yamaha 375 receiver if I connect digital or hdmi it disables the balance/bass treble etc but they work with anolog don't know if yours might be the same just abit strang if anolog doing it aswell

Jan 15, 2014 | Harmon Kardon Harman Kardon Avr 525 7.1...

Tip

How to set up a seven-speaker home theater system


Set up a home theater

How to connect your speakers

In order to deliver surround sound, home theater systems require 5, 6, or even 7 speakers--and that's not even counting the subwoofer. Connecting all those speakers together can be quite a challenge, so here's a quick overview of the basics.

If you don't have an all-in-one, home-theater-in-a-box system, you'll probably need to supply your own speaker cables. There are several different types available--they vary in terms of wire size (or gauges) and termination types. Make sure you pick cable that's a good match for your speakers and receiver. And make sure they're long enough; the rear-channel cables in particular will be stretching all the way around the room.

Once you've selected your system and have all your speakers ready to set up, begin by placing each speaker at or near its intended location. Then, attach the cables to them one by one. After securely fastening one end of the cable to the speaker, connect the other end to the appropriate speaker output on the back of the A/V receiver. Be sure to connect the cable to the correctly labeled output.

For instance, the front-right speaker wire needs to go to the terminal labeled front-right. Also, make sure that each speaker connection is in phase, meaning negative to negative and positive to positive. Otherwise, your system's sound will sound out of whack. Repeat the process for every speaker in your system. Note that the subwoofer uses a coaxial-style RCA cable instead of standard speaker wire.

Once all the wires are connected, you should test the system with several DVDs and CDs, to ensure that everything is in working order.

For our first example, we used an elaborate 7.1-channel system, so it may have 1, 2, or several more speakers than your system. Some systems even employ wireless rear speakers, or virtual surround-surround modes that simulate multichannel experience from 3, 2, or even 1 speaker. And some listeners still prefer good old stereo sound from 2 speakers. No matter what type of speaker setup you prefer, however, the wiring basics remain the same.

How to position surround-sound speakers and a subwoofer
To get the best performance from a surround-sound speaker system, you must install each speaker in the correct location. There are three basic types of surround-sound speaker systems.

  • The 5.1-channel system has five satellite speakers and a subwoofer.

  • 6.1-channel systems have six satellites and a subwoofer.

  • And 7.1-channel systems have seven satellites and a subwoofer.

Start by placing the center speaker either directly above or directly below your TV. The center speaker can be perched atop a direct-view TV or mounted on the wall. Aim the center speaker at ear level.

In most cases, the front-left and front-right speakers can be wall mounted or placed on stands. However, if your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, they should not be wall mounted. Space your front-left and front-right speakers the same distance apart as the distance between your center speaker and your listening position. Position the front-left and front-right speakers no more than two feet above or below the front-center speaker. The tweeters in the front-left and front-right speakers should be roughly at ear level relative to your seating position.

Ideally, the surround-left and surround-right speakers should be mounted on the side walls of your room, slightly behind or parallel to your listening position. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, place them on stands instead. If installing the speakers on the side walls isn't practical, you can mount them on the room's rear wall or place them on stands behind your listening position. The surround speakers can be installed up to two feet above the front speakers.

Also, 6.1 surround systems have a back-center speaker. You'll typically mount this on the rear wall of your room, centered behind your seating position. Position the back-center speaker no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speaker has a rear-panel bass port or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the back center speaker on a stand instead. The back-center speaker should be installed at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

Instead of a single back speaker, 7.1 surround systems use a back-left and a back-right speaker. These, too, are typically mounted on the rear wall of your room. Position the back-left and back-right speakers so that each is approximately aligned with the left and right edges of your listening position. Place the back-left and back-right speakers no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports,or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the speakers on stands instead. Install the back-left and back-right speakers at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

A subwoofer is the last component of a 5, 6, or 7.1 system. Because bass frequencies are nondirectional, you can place the subwoofer in various locations. You may get the best performance by installing the subwoofer in the front of the room, approximately six inches from the wall. If you want more bass, try placing the sub near a corner in the front of the room.

Connect your DVD player to your A/V receiver--digitally
To hear a movie's soundtrack in surround sound, you must first connect your DVD player to an A/V surround-sound receiver. You'll need to make what is called a multi-channel-compatible connection.

The easiest way to do this is to use a cable that carries a digital signal. There are two digital options: optical and coaxial.

An optical digital connection, also called TosLink, uses pulses of light to deliver a digital signal. According to some experts, one advantage of optical digital connections is that optical cables don't pick up noise, while lower-quality coaxial cables can. Many, but not all, DVD players have an optical output. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple optical inputs. Plug one end of the optical cable into the DVDs player's optical-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's optical input.

Finally, you need to tell your receiver to use the optical connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. This is called assigning the input. Information about this simple process can be found in your A/V receiver's manual.

A second option is a coaxial digital connection. This type of connection is also used for cable TV, but the connectors are different. This type of coaxial cable has an RCA connector. Coaxial cables are less expensive than optical ones. In fact, you can use any old RCA cable to make a coaxial digital connection, and you won't lose any audio quality.

Most, but not all, DVD players, have a coaxial output. Some have coaxial and optical outputs, so you get a choice. Audiophiles argue over which connection is better, but it's very hard to hear the difference. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple coaxial inputs. Plug one end of the coaxial cable into the DVD player's coaxial-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's coaxial input.

Finally, tell your receiver to use the coaxial connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. Again, your A/V receiver's manual will have instructions for assigning an input.

on Aug 13, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Replacement part or schematic for Cambridge Soundworks computer speakers


I'm in the same predicament! I found this - it seems close, though the pins seem to be spaced closer together, but it looks like they might be bent to fit the wider PC board spacing. The rotating shaft also seems smaller - the original is larger than 1/4".
What do you think?

Jan 04, 2013 | Cambridge Soundworks SWBE SoundWorks PC...

1 Answer

Sound not coming out of Sony HCDGX470


It is possible you missed a connection and did not realize it, the only way to be sure is dis-assemble the unit and carefully check your ribbon connection that it is secure.

May 03, 2012 | Sony MHC-GX470 Shelf System

2 Answers

Creative Gigaworks T20 (series I) Left speaker just producing noice, until I turn the Bass knob counterclockwise towards "minus" - then there is sound in the left speaker but even more noice...


The problem that developed with my Creative Gigaworks and other is that occasionally it would not play at all. When the problem occurred, I could eventually get it to work again by turning it on and off several times. I opened up the powered unit (the Right speaker with the controls and found that the wires were really crammed in there, such that a white ribbon wire connector on the bottom was straining to the point of where it was slightly cracked. While playing audio through it, if I touched that wire ribbon, the sound would cut out. So I adjusted the wires slightly to relieve any tension force on that connector and it has not had the problem since. I would open up that unit and check for a similar poor or strained connection. To open the unit, carefully pull off the fabric speaker cover straight off, remove the 4 rubber inserts in the top 4 holes, and remove all 6 philips-head screws in those deeply recessed holes.

Jun 03, 2011 | Creative Labs GigaWorks T20 Computer...

1 Answer

Unable to receive optimum output. The bass is totally flat !


Hi, ok the Bose Acoustimass III system consists of two small cube speakers and one subwoofer unit called the Acoustimass bass module. If the subwoofer stops working, three points can be the cause of the failure. The Bose Acoustimass III is a passive system, meaning the speakers do not power themselves, but instead are connected to a receiver or amplifier. Thus, the amplifier, the speaker between the amplifier and the subwoofer, or the subwoofer itself could be the issue.

Things You'll Need:

* Amplifier
* Speaker cable
* Extra subwoofer


Instructions


Disconnect the speaker cable from the back of the Bose Accoustimass bass module and connect it to a subwoofer that is known to be working. If the subwoofer works, the bass module needs to be replaced.


Disconnect the speaker cable from the back of the receiver or amplifier you are using and from the back of the subwoofer in Step 1.


Connect a speaker cable that is known to be working between the back of the receiver or amplifier and the back of the Accoustimass module. If the module starts working, then the cable was the issue.


Disconnect the speaker cable from Step 3 from the back of the amplifier or receiver, then connect the cable to the subwoofer port on the back of an amplifier or receiver that is known to be working. If the subwoofer works, the receiver was the issue. If the subwoofer still does not work, verify that the speaker cable is in the subwoofer port of the receiver/amplifier and that the cable is connected securely to the subwoofer.



If you think you did the connection properly,Fine... If not you can use the manual from the below link and know how to connect it properly..

products.bose.com/pdf/customer_service/owners/og_am5iii.pdf


Have a nice day..

Feb 19, 2011 | Bose Acoustimass 5 III System

1 Answer

I can't get any real bass out of this unit. Iv'e gone thru the manual 20 times and I set the "DZE" off, then adjust the bass to max and it made a little difference. But this unit is suposed to...


Hi,
Try to exchange one speaker connections only, unplug connector from speaker and put them + to - and - to + pins.
In my opinion, both speakers are giving out of phase sound that cancels the bass sound, speaker connections should be same phase to get bass sound so just change connecting two wires at any one speaker, that will work.
Thanks.

Nov 26, 2010 | Clarion DXZ785USB Car CD/ MP3 Player

1 Answer

Setting up Surround SOund to LCD Television


All you have done is purchased the speakers for a surround system. So now you need a Surround Sound system.
The surround system, should have a power output no greater than 100 watts per channel. And be capable of connecting 6 ohm speakers.
The choice of unit will depend on price you can afford and the features you want. Check your TV to see if it has a Optical out socket. Or just HDMI sockets. If it has an optical socket, make certain that Surround unit has a couple of these. You will also need to purchase an optical lead, you can pick these up in cheap bargain shops. If you have a DVD or Blue Ray player, check them for the same. If one or more has co-axial sound output, make certain your amp or receiver has one. The more items you have connected to the receiver using optical out, the more sockets you will need. The more digital inputs on the unit the better it will be. The receiver should have at least Dolby Digital 5.1 settings and possibly DTS on it.

Mar 01, 2017 | JVC SXXSW6000 Speaker

1 Answer

I can't get bass thru the spkrs


So when you aren't using the sub woofer there's not enough bass, so you need more out of the other speakers. Chances are the front speakers are set to "small" in the receivers menu, change it to "large"if your front speakers have a 6 inch woofer or larger. Note: If you leave the sub on, the input signal to it will be greatly reduced when the speakers are set to "large". Hope this helps.

Feb 12, 2009 | Sony Audio Players & Recorders

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