Question about MSI KM4M-L Motherboard

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Graphic card problem

You told me maybe its with the power, yes there is a port like the one next to my IDE cable in my hard disk, but the fan on the graphic card is working but my monitor says NO SIGNAL. If i try to plug the cable on the graphic card and if its not good will be the card damaged?? ( The graphic card is an NVIDEA 6600 256MB 128 Bit)

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  • BIOS21 Jun 15, 2008

    Thanks a lot!! It works!!!

  • Anonymous Jul 27, 2008

    my graphic card do n't display any image also the monitor no signal

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Hi BIOS21, I know this much. I know you're motherboard can not use a PCI-Express video card. You're board can not support SLI. I know from looking & reading the manual for the MSI KM4-L you're board supports an AGP video card. I also know some AGP video cards need extra power for them to function. This varies from card to card. You did find an open power port on you're AGP NVIDA 6600 256MG 128bit card. So plug in the power cord. Every AGP card receives power from the AGP port. Enough to run the fan. Depending on the card it may also need more power provided by the system to function. This is you're case. The power connector would not be on the card if it was not needed. Other AGP cards use the same power cord as a floppy drive. (Just so you know).

Mike

Posted on Jun 11, 2008

  • Mike Peluso
    Mike Peluso Jun 11, 2008

    You're video card did come with instruction. You should go over those instructions.

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Foxconn 761mx


I'm going to presume that you have a tower or case that is the correct size.

First clean out the case of any junk, dust, etc. Then ground yourself to the case so as to dissipate any static electricity. I suggest you get a static clip for this.

Remove the motherboard from the static free film bag and locate the screw set bag. Most of the screws for ATX and Micro-ATX boards are standardized so it really doesn't matter which screws you use out of the bag. The vast majority of them should have a multi-head (phillips, flat, hex). Take the motherboard and gently place it in the case, making sure the case is on it's "back" so that the side you're mounting the motherboard to is flat on the ground.

Align the screw holes of the motherboard with the best fit of the screw holes found on the case. Note: If it is an intel based processor motherboard, you may need to mount the processor first and then the heat sync and fan before mounting it to the case, as it mounts directly to the motherboard. Since the Foxconn 761mx is an AMD board, this shouldn't be an issue.

Then locate your peripheral components (hard drive, optical drive, fans, heat sync, processor, ram, case fans, video card etc). Mount the AMD processor into the AM2 socket, making sure the socket handle is up or in the unlocked position. Once it is seated lock the processor into the socket by placing the handle down. Be firm but gentle in pushing the arm down. It should lock in smoothly, if you feel any major resistance, stop, release the handle and check to make sure the processor is in place correctly.

Once the processor is installed, cover the base of your heat sync with heat gel (Thermal Compound)(if it doesn't already have it, I suggest Arctic Silver~ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835100007~ as it is superior than most of the preloaded gels).
Because this is an AM2 socket with a specialized clip, you'll find that it can be a little persnickety getting it on. The heat sync you have should tell you how to do it. If I remember correctly this particular clip you unscrew and loosen the side clips. The heat sync fits under this type and you then clamp it down. But I'm going off of a picture so I'm not exactly sure.

Once the heat sync is mounted and pressed firmly against your processor you're ready to situate your other components. Install your ram (making sure to match the notches to the spacer. This motherboard uses DDR2 ram so it's not that fast, but you have two slots to fill up to a max of 16 gb). Place your hard drives or SSDs into the drive bay where you'd like them to be, and place the optical drive into the optical drive bay. If you're going to install a zip drive or floppy drive (first why?) connect it to the black IDE connector. The primary hard drive on this motherboard can be either SATA or IDE. You can get SATA to IDE adapters if you need to have more than one SATA hard drive, or you can purchase a PCI-E SATA controller to expand the hard drive space.

Mount your video card in the PCI-Express X16 slot (the long yellow slot) and then mount your power supply in the specified space in the case. Finally mount your case fans. Usually one in the back below the power supply (if it's an upright case) and one in the front near the hard drive bay.

The power supply will have four screws (probably already in the case) that will hold it into place.

Now that all of your components are seated or mounted, it's time to connect the power supply to the components.

First locate the ATX power lead. This is pretty self explanatory. This will either be 12 by 2 or 8 by 2+ 2 by 2, or 12 by 2+2 by 2 connector that fits the main power connector on the motherboard, located next to the two ram slots. You'll find a 2 by 2 power port next to the processor slot. Seat both power power connections on the board.

On this board there are two power input only. The remainder of the power output goes to the hard drives or ssd, the optical drive, fans and heat sync, and possibly video card or other expansion cards. If you've installed legacy equipment (non-sata or IDE hardware) you'll have a large white four prong male plug that will fit tightly into a four prong female plug on the legacy equipment.

Where as if you're working purely with SATA devices, you'll have a flat power supply plug that is keyed (looks like an L) that fits into the smaller power supply plug found most often to the left of the main SATA port on the hardware. This plug will be larger than the SATA plug in width, but thinner in height.

The IDE port and 10 pin IDE port for the legacy hard drive and floppy drive on this motherboard sit next to the main power plug, while the SATA ports are the Two Blue L shaped plugs. The IDE port is blue while the 10 pin IDE port (for the floppy) is black with a lower left hand missing pin (keyed).

Connect your hardware to their respective ports.
Next locate the 8 pin plugs for the Case USB ports labeled USB1 and USB2, usually for the front. Most cases come with a front USB expansion port. This will attach to one of the 8 pin connection points on the motherboard. Some older cases come with firewire or extra usb expansion cables which can be attached to either USB pin plug. USB1 and USB2 ports are painted green on the motherboard.

You'll find on this motherboard four more plugs, one that looks like a very small black four pin port near your cmos battery, a four pin port that has no plastic around it labeled COM2 with a blue underlay painted on the board. A black painted 7 pin plug near the 4 pin black port and then another 4 pin plug point labeled speaker.

If you want to have a case speaker installed for use with beep codes (a set of CMOS codes that will beep if there is hardware failure) plug the speaker into this port (note: most new cases don't come with this speaker and to acquire one you should check with any second hand computer repair company). The 7 pin black pin plug is where you connect your power and reset button and power on light. The 4 pin port near the Cmos battery is for audio exchange. While most new SATA optical drives run audio through the SATA controller some legacy optical drives that are IDE need to be connected to the onboard audio using a 4 pin cable. COM2 is rarely used, but can be used for other controls, it works as a port extension. Many new motherboards don't have these because everything has gone USB and the old serial port standard isn't used anymore.

That is a complete guide to putting together your computer.

Oct 13, 2013 | Motherboards

1 Answer

My motherboard cant detect hard disk ,disk driver and when i start my computer it dint show HDD LED light (red light) and it show "No Hard Disk detected, Please insert Hard Disk and Press Enter. i...


Hi there,

THere maybe a problem with the SATA/IDE connection.Check the connection first using another cable or try to another port. If it doesn't work, try the drive on another PC. Check for the power connection cable as well.

Let me know if this works,
levibit

Dec 17, 2010 | Gigabyte 8VM533M-RZ (GA-8VM533M-RZ)...

1 Answer

What are the different parts of a motherboard?


The motherboard or PCB (Primary Circuit Board) is responsible for connecting all computer devices to the microprocessor. It supplies devices with power and allows the computer to react with them, Devices that can be used by connecting to the motherboard are: Storage devices, sound cards, graphic cards and hard disks.
Devices or components that are needed to make the computer work as it should, are inbuilt within the motherboard or can be connected to it using a socket or port. Listed below are sockets and ports that are available on the motherboard for connecting devices and , what that they are capable of doing.
PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect) slot: Supports peripherals like sound cards, DVD decoders, and graphic accelerators with 32 bits at 33Mhz capabilities. There are usually anywhere from 1 to 6 PCI slots available on the motherboard.
AGP (Accelerated Graphic Port): This provides fast bus speed connectivity along with fast access to the main memory. It is designed for video cards that demand higher bandwidth.
Chipset-North Bridge: An integrated circuit that has special duties.
CPU (Central Processing Unit) socket: A socket specifically for connecting your computer processor.
DIMM (Double Inline Memory Module) slots, SIMM (Single Inline Memory Module) and RIMM: Different types of memory (RAM) can be installed into these slots.
Motherboard Battery: A battery compartment, which stores the battery used for storing data such as system date and time, when you shut down your system.
IDE Connector: Responsible for connecting the IDE cord used for hard disks, CD drives, and DVD drives.
Firewire header (IEEE 1394): A serial bus used to exchange digital and audio data with high performance abilities.
The following listed items are parts that are built within the motherboard with specific connective uses such as keyboards, mouse, and printers.
PS/2 Connectors: Each motherboard usually has 2 PS/2 connectors for the keyboard and the mouse.
USB (Universal Serial Bus) port: There are usually a couple of these ports located on each motherboard used for connecting pen drives and external hard drives, like Ipods or Mp3 players.
Parallel or (LPT) port: The place used to connect scanners and printers.
Game Port: The port to connect all gaming devices for example, a joystick.
Sound Card Connectors: Plug in your microphone or speakers here.
Display Connector: Connecting your monitor to the motherboard.
COM (Communication) port: The port designed to connect your mouse and modem.

Jun 18, 2010 | Intel Motherboard

1 Answer

Intel 865GSA


Looking at the vendors I buy parts from, all the cards I saw offer both SATA and IDE ports. Here's one as an example. You definitely want SATA capability as most newer drives are only being offered as SATA, so you'll have a wider selection to choose from.

Another possibility: start fresh with a new system board. If the onboard IDE controller isn't working properly, this may be a warning sign that other problems follow. You might be better off spending your money on a new mobo that already supports IDE and SATA.

Hope this helps you make up your mind. Thanks for using Fixya!

Feb 20, 2010 | Intel 865G Motherboard

2 Answers

IDE Ports not working on ASUS P5LD2-VM Mobo


Good Day sir, hi, Have you tried to enable the IDE on BIOS setup. If the Bios setup did not solve the IDE problem, check the IDE port of the HARD drive, check if there are bent pins.
If still wont work, you can buy a PCI to IDE/SATA card, this is an expansion card in PCI format with IDE and SATA port.We use this card incase the IDE or SATA on the motherboard gets bad. Connect it on the available PCI slot. Then connect the IDE cable of the Hard disk to this card. Thats it.

Nov 10, 2009 | ASUS P5LD2-VM Motherboard

1 Answer

Primary IDE port does not work. My main hard disk drive and DVD writer drive are connected to the Secondary IDE port. If I move them to the the Primary IDE port, both the drives do not get detected at all....


Good day sir, there are several way to connect an extra IDE if the motherboard is full:
  1. Buy a PCI to IDE/SATA card. Check your local computer dealer if there is available.
  2. Buy an external USB to IDE Hard disk enclosure.
Of course, these are things to buy, but check first the CMOS setup if the Primary IDE is enabled on your PC.

Oct 12, 2009 | Intel D865GVHZ Motherboard

2 Answers

Msi 848p neo v motherboard problems.


Once you reset the bios everything goes to manufactures default settings. You will need to make some changes within the bios. You'll need the help of the manual. See page 3-20.
If your operating system is loaded on to the ATA IDE drive make sure you set bios settings as follows:
Connect the ATA IDE to MB primary master IDE port.
Connect the ATA SATA drive to the MB's first SATA port.

ATA Configuration
Set as, [P-ATA+S-ATA]
S-ATA Keep [Enabled] Set to [Yes] This enables the SATA controller.
P-ATA Keep [Enabled] Set to [Yes] This enables the IDE controller.
On-chip IDE configuration, "ATA Configuration = [P-ATA+S-ATA]".
Next go to Boot menu. Make sure the ATA IDE drive is chosen as boot device three.
First boot device [Floppy] (If you have a floppy disk drive connected.)
Second boot device would be [DVD/CD-ROM] drive. This should be connected to the MB's secondary IDE port & the DVD/CD-ROM drives Master/Slave jumper, set to Master.
Third boot device [ATA IDE drive]
If your boot drive is the SATA drive than set: third boot device to the SATA drive.
(Hard disk drive with operating system loaded on it).
Save your changes & exit the bios.
Keep in mind all ATA SATA drives are seen as Master drives. SATA drives are seen by the SATA controller & in order by their connection to the SATA port number.
Save & exit the bios. The system will auto restart. Windows should start.

Jul 25, 2009 | MSI Motherboards

1 Answer

Bootup,hardwere,,or some problem....


Sudden shut downs are often heat related. Modern motherboards have a sensor under the CPU that cuts off the power when the temperature gets above a certain point (sometimes this point can be set in the BIOS). Usually the CPU fan will spin up very fast trying to cool off the processor just before it shuts down. Often you can feel the heatsink being very hot as well.

I suggest you check your vent holes for clogging (hair, dust, etc.) to make sure you are getting good airflow. Next, peek into the CPU fan to see if there is dust accumulated underneath blocking the heatsink from expelling heat (the dust layer acts like a blanket and keeps the heat in). Finally, if you are technically inclined you can try removing the heatsink/CPU fan and reapply thermal paste to the processor.

Dec 27, 2008 | Asrock K7S41GX Motherboard

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