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I get white eyes inside the gym - Olympus Cameras

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Hi -

I am not all that familiar with the Olympus camera settings, but see if you can adjust the lighting setting when you plan on taking pictures inside the gym - set it for Tungsten, if you have such a setting - it will help to adjust the colors.

Posted on Jun 12, 2008

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I have a Nikon d200 and need to take sports photos in a basketball court The sport is very fast moving. What should I set the camera to. Lately the photos are dark and or blurry


You want the fastest shutter speed you can get and the largest aperture possible.
If you're close enough and it's allowed, use the flash. The flash will freeze the action. However, it's likely to give you a dark background instead of a blurry background.
If not, use the Aperture Priority mode. Open the lens to its maximum aperture (smallest f/number). This will give you the fastest shutter speed for the existing lighting conditions. The fast shutter speed will freeze the action and the large aperture will blur the background, though the amount of freezing may be limited if the lighting is relatively dark, as in a high school gym.
Be aware that if you're shooting indoors you're going up against the laws of physics. The human eye can adapt much better than any camera. A high school gym will appear light enough once you've been inside for a few minutes, but it is much, much darker than a bright day outdoors.

Apr 28, 2012 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm...

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Need help with settings to shoot in gymnasium - thanks


Virtually all cameras have a provision to set the "white balance" for different types of lights. You need to set your white balance for flourescent lighting. If that doesn't give you the color you want, don't hesitate to try the other settings...one of them may be exactly what you're looking for.

Nov 09, 2011 | Canon PowerShot G9 Digital Camera

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I'm having a couple problems with my Nikon D90 and for the life of me that manual is too confusing, The first problem I'm having is.... I'm taking pictures at my sons wrestling events and I can't get it...


I imagine your son's wrestling events are held in school gyms with lighting that is less than ideal. If you are taking pictures without a flash then the blurriness you describe could well be due to a slow shutter speed. Your camera is using a slower shutter speed to gather enough light, but your subjects are moving fast enough to cause motion blur in the picture. Either you increase the aperture (larger aperture = smaller f number), increase the ISO number (equivalent to film speed), or you use a flash. If you do use a flash, the built-in pop-up flash is only useful for close shots probably no more than 15 feet away or so. A speedlight flash, such as the Nikon SB-400, Sb-600, SB-700 or SB-900 will project the light much farther.

If you set your ISO manually to 1250 or 1600 and put your D90 on shutter-priority (the "S" on the left dial) then you can use the right rear dial to set your shutter speed and the camera will set the aperture for you. To stop the action you will likely need at least 1/125 or 1/160 of a second. Go as high (fast) as you can--the limit will be your lens. The standard "kit" lenses are mostly F5.6 as the biggest aperture, and that is limiting without a flash or daylight. You might also try a monopod--a one-legged stand--to help steady your camera for you.

Dec 09, 2010 | Nikon D90 Digital Camera with 18-105mm...

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DSC-H7 camera, getting red eye or white eye spots


First, here is why they are red or white spots:

The red is the reflection of your flash on the retinas of your subjects. The white are generally animal eyes reflecting back.

You will notice this on flash shots only and mostly when you use the zoom. The zoom uses a "narrow" field of view so the light that reflects back is "direct", instrad of at an angle.

The fix: Change the ISO setting (it is set too high). It is probably near the maximum sensitivity (3200?)... set it to 400 or so and try that for a while. 800 is probably the best general setting, but try 400 first.

Try not to use the flash unless you really have to, but only if the subject is less than 12 feet away. If no people are in the picture, you may use the flash for subjects greater than 12 feet.

this should work for you...

Sep 11, 2009 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H7 Digital Camera

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I take pictures for a very small school. One of the issues that I continue to run into is while taking pictures in the gym (1932) the lighting makes the pictures turn out mostly yellow. Is there a way


By using the manual white balance adjustment on most cameras, you can "filter" out the yellowish color cast you are experiencing. The adjustment is best made while standing in the area in which you will be shooting. You will see the shift in color on the camera's LCD as you switch from setting to setting. On most cameras adjustment to white balance requires you to take the camera off it's fully automatic setting.

May 21, 2009 | Canon Cameras

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I get eyes that glow white in my pictures


bubba41, You didn't mention using the built-in pop-up flash that's when you get the "red-eye" and you can set the flash for redeye reduction when it's used.  If you are taking an indoor photo without the flash, if the redeye reduction is on turn it off that would eliminate the zombie or X-men eyes you are describing. randy320sgi

Jan 10, 2009 | Nikon D70s Digital Camera

1 Answer

Yellow gym pictures


The lighting in the gym was the cause most likely. Try setting the white balance to a different mode

Feb 07, 2008 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera with 18-55mm Lens

2 Answers

Animal Eyes


I've seen some of those white eyes photos. Some are down right scary. I'm sure you have encountered red-eye when taking flash photos of people. With some animals, it is not red - but white. .... Try to catch the animal looking away from the camera when you take that flash picture. Have someone distract him/her. ............ Fixing Demonic Pet Eyes http://graphicssoft.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ&sdn=graphicssoft&zu=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.myjanee.com%2Ftuts%2Fpeteyes%2Fpeteyes.htm http://graphicssoft.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ&sdn=graphicssoft&zu=http%3A%2F%2Ftlbtlb.com%2Ftlbimages%2Fmax2.html

Aug 31, 2005 | Canon PowerShot SD400 / IXUS 50 Digital...

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