Question about LG LHB977 Theater System

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On the rear LH977 speakers, is it bettter to mount them on the walls up high? My DVD will not and purchase the systems as it and happy because my wife and I never watch dvd. Paid $350 for unit, did I get rippped? I seen the price tag of $699. Can I piggy back another blue ray/dvd off my LG 1088 TV? Dave @ [email protected] I love the S-sound just with the TV cable.

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: NO SOUND WHEN WATCHING CABLE TV

Hello.. How do you have your audio from your cable box into the LG? I am asking because I want to use the Optical input so I can use this system for suround sound off my DirectTV DVR, What input do I need to set the LG to to make this work?

Posted on Nov 24, 2008

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  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: I have and lg tv and a samsung home theater

optical audio cable from home theater to tv. can be purchased on line for a few bucks.

Posted on Jan 04, 2010

dunnbiker
  • 8546 Answers

SOURCE: Hey, on my LG Blu-ray I have with surround sound,

You already said the Blu-Ray is working, so let's assume it's ok. Other source(s) don't produce surround so that leaves it (them) orthe one place they all come together - your receiver / theater system. Multichannel sound will only come from properly connected digital sources. Is that the case?

Posted on Jan 21, 2010

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: I have an LG all in one home theatre system, LCD

OK. For all you regular Joe's like me here's the fix--plain and simple! I have Dish Networks HD receiver, an LG Home Theater System (LHB953) and an LG HD Television - although I suspect this applies for most LG TV-to-LG Audio Systems used in combination with a HD TV). My problem lied within the LG to LG setting known as SIMPLINK which tries to "auto-configure" everything between LG to LG devices.

Do this to make your HD TV (using Dish/DirecTV) play it's HD video display from the satellite provider but play the audio over the LG surround sound speakers:

1. Plug a HDMI cable from your satelite receiver's set-top-box to your HD TV. This will carry your HD "video" ONLY. Click "Input" on the TV remote until the HD video signal shows your desired TV channel from your satellite provider.

2. Plug an HD Optical cable (the one with the red laser) from your LG HTS (Home Theater System) to your satellite box. This will carry your HD "audio" ONLY.

3. This is the magic everyone seems to be overlooking. On the LG TV remote, go into the menu options and disable SIMPLINK by setting SIMPLINK=OFF. This feature allows the video and audio signals to be split over 2 different ports: HD video goes over the HDMI cable and the audio to go over the HD Optical cable.

Hope this helps!
Scott C.

Posted on Feb 08, 2010

  • 85 Answers

SOURCE: I have an LG TV

Hello,
There are two things that I can suggest.
1-Test your optical cables to make sure they a good on a known working source because they are very fragile and break very easily.
2-Try to eliminate the use of optical output from tv to receiver. There may be a problem from the HDMI to optical conversion at the tv. Instead, try running the audio directly from the source to the receiver, and let the tv deal with video input only.
Hope this helps,
Good Luck.

Posted on Jan 07, 2011

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I cannot get sound from Insignia Speaker ND-POS20?


Speaker Placement Before shopping for speakers, try to imagine where you're going to put them in your room. Speakers can be placed on floor stands, hung on wall brackets, or placed on furniture. Subwoofers typically sound best in room corners or near the left- or right-front speakers.
The front three--left, center, and right--speakers usually sound best when positioned with their tweeters elevated to the same height as a seated listener's ears. In any case, try to keep the center speaker near the same height as the left and right speakers.
You can place speakers on shelves or on/in a low cabinet or entertainment center. Some speakers are better suited to this arrangement than others. "Acoustic suspension" sealed satellites are the most appropriate. Next best are ported speakers--as long as the ports are located on the front of the cabinet. However, speakers with rear-mounted ports won't perform at their peak when placed inside a piece of furniture.
As for the rear-channel surround speakers, they usually sound best when positioned three or more feet higher than the front speakers. However, high-fidelity DVD-Audio and Super Audio CD music will sound best when surround speakers are placed at the same height (ear level) as the front speakers.

Read more: http://reviews.cnet.com/speakers-speaker-systems/insignia-2-0-speaker/4505-6467_7-32912127.html#ixzz1MpaHsur1

May 19, 2011 | Insignia 2.0 Speaker System (2-Piece)

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How to set up a seven-speaker home theater system


Set up a home theater

How to connect your speakers

In order to deliver surround sound, home theater systems require 5, 6, or even 7 speakers--and that's not even counting the subwoofer. Connecting all those speakers together can be quite a challenge, so here's a quick overview of the basics.

If you don't have an all-in-one, home-theater-in-a-box system, you'll probably need to supply your own speaker cables. There are several different types available--they vary in terms of wire size (or gauges) and termination types. Make sure you pick cable that's a good match for your speakers and receiver. And make sure they're long enough; the rear-channel cables in particular will be stretching all the way around the room.

Once you've selected your system and have all your speakers ready to set up, begin by placing each speaker at or near its intended location. Then, attach the cables to them one by one. After securely fastening one end of the cable to the speaker, connect the other end to the appropriate speaker output on the back of the A/V receiver. Be sure to connect the cable to the correctly labeled output.

For instance, the front-right speaker wire needs to go to the terminal labeled front-right. Also, make sure that each speaker connection is in phase, meaning negative to negative and positive to positive. Otherwise, your system's sound will sound out of whack. Repeat the process for every speaker in your system. Note that the subwoofer uses a coaxial-style RCA cable instead of standard speaker wire.

Once all the wires are connected, you should test the system with several DVDs and CDs, to ensure that everything is in working order.

For our first example, we used an elaborate 7.1-channel system, so it may have 1, 2, or several more speakers than your system. Some systems even employ wireless rear speakers, or virtual surround-surround modes that simulate multichannel experience from 3, 2, or even 1 speaker. And some listeners still prefer good old stereo sound from 2 speakers. No matter what type of speaker setup you prefer, however, the wiring basics remain the same.

How to position surround-sound speakers and a subwoofer
To get the best performance from a surround-sound speaker system, you must install each speaker in the correct location. There are three basic types of surround-sound speaker systems.

  • The 5.1-channel system has five satellite speakers and a subwoofer.

  • 6.1-channel systems have six satellites and a subwoofer.

  • And 7.1-channel systems have seven satellites and a subwoofer.

Start by placing the center speaker either directly above or directly below your TV. The center speaker can be perched atop a direct-view TV or mounted on the wall. Aim the center speaker at ear level.

In most cases, the front-left and front-right speakers can be wall mounted or placed on stands. However, if your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, they should not be wall mounted. Space your front-left and front-right speakers the same distance apart as the distance between your center speaker and your listening position. Position the front-left and front-right speakers no more than two feet above or below the front-center speaker. The tweeters in the front-left and front-right speakers should be roughly at ear level relative to your seating position.

Ideally, the surround-left and surround-right speakers should be mounted on the side walls of your room, slightly behind or parallel to your listening position. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, place them on stands instead. If installing the speakers on the side walls isn't practical, you can mount them on the room's rear wall or place them on stands behind your listening position. The surround speakers can be installed up to two feet above the front speakers.

Also, 6.1 surround systems have a back-center speaker. You'll typically mount this on the rear wall of your room, centered behind your seating position. Position the back-center speaker no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speaker has a rear-panel bass port or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the back center speaker on a stand instead. The back-center speaker should be installed at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

Instead of a single back speaker, 7.1 surround systems use a back-left and a back-right speaker. These, too, are typically mounted on the rear wall of your room. Position the back-left and back-right speakers so that each is approximately aligned with the left and right edges of your listening position. Place the back-left and back-right speakers no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports,or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the speakers on stands instead. Install the back-left and back-right speakers at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

A subwoofer is the last component of a 5, 6, or 7.1 system. Because bass frequencies are nondirectional, you can place the subwoofer in various locations. You may get the best performance by installing the subwoofer in the front of the room, approximately six inches from the wall. If you want more bass, try placing the sub near a corner in the front of the room.

Connect your DVD player to your A/V receiver--digitally
To hear a movie's soundtrack in surround sound, you must first connect your DVD player to an A/V surround-sound receiver. You'll need to make what is called a multi-channel-compatible connection.

The easiest way to do this is to use a cable that carries a digital signal. There are two digital options: optical and coaxial.

An optical digital connection, also called TosLink, uses pulses of light to deliver a digital signal. According to some experts, one advantage of optical digital connections is that optical cables don't pick up noise, while lower-quality coaxial cables can. Many, but not all, DVD players have an optical output. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple optical inputs. Plug one end of the optical cable into the DVDs player's optical-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's optical input.

Finally, you need to tell your receiver to use the optical connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. This is called assigning the input. Information about this simple process can be found in your A/V receiver's manual.

A second option is a coaxial digital connection. This type of connection is also used for cable TV, but the connectors are different. This type of coaxial cable has an RCA connector. Coaxial cables are less expensive than optical ones. In fact, you can use any old RCA cable to make a coaxial digital connection, and you won't lose any audio quality.

Most, but not all, DVD players, have a coaxial output. Some have coaxial and optical outputs, so you get a choice. Audiophiles argue over which connection is better, but it's very hard to hear the difference. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple coaxial inputs. Plug one end of the coaxial cable into the DVD player's coaxial-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's coaxial input.

Finally, tell your receiver to use the coaxial connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. Again, your A/V receiver's manual will have instructions for assigning an input.

on Aug 13, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

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Home Theater Setup - Rear Speakers


When people install their own home theater systems they typically use these small stick-type stands for the rear speakers. This leaves one (or all) rear speaker blasting right into your ear, which is not how the rear speakers should be.

Rear speakers should be mounted two to three feet above ear level or higher, get those speakers off of the stands and onto the walls. The reason for this is that they were intended to add a background effect, they are not meant to distract your from the picture.

If your room (or significant other) does not allow speakers to be mounted up, then move your rears back a bit and aim them towards each other, this will maximize their effect and not distract you from the front while you enjoy your movie.

on Jan 27, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

How high do you put the speakers on the wall and at the same height?


Ideally speakers should be at about 5 feet high on a wall, you can mount them higher but you have to incline them 2 to 5 degrees downwords.

Cheers!

Jan 15, 2011 | Avia DHT630 System

1 Answer

I need wall mounts for the Sony dav-fc8 speakers


You can buy the mounts the rear speakers from sony style for about $40. They match the color of the speakers. The sony style website is the only place i found the mounts for these speakers.

Feb 06, 2009 | Sony DAV-FC8 System

1 Answer

Can't get the surround sound to play the rear speakers and small front speaker


Sounds like it's just in 2 channel stereo mode, only 2 speakers working out of 5 and a sub, look for a selector switch for switching to 5.1 surround, as far as the no video problem try replacing the cable for the video connection. 

Aug 04, 2008 | Panasonic Home Theater System System

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I just purchased a durabrand modle sts96 home theater system. The speaker wires for the rear speakers are to short to reach my back wall. Do you make speaker wire extextions for this system?


If it has spring clip connectors you can buy any 12 gage speaker wire any length you need and run it from your amp to the speakers. Do not try to splice the wire or you could put the speakers out of phase or short out the Amp.

Feb 22, 2008 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

Rear speakers


THE 4 WIRES SHOULD BE FROM THE REAR SPEAKERS THEY GET WIRED INTO THE SURROUND SPEAKER OUT POSTS ON YOUR AMP (MAKE SURE YOU DO NOT GO INTO SURROUND BACK THIS IS FOR 6.1 AND 7.1 SYSTEMS).WHAT ARE THE WALL UNITS? NEED MORE INFO TO TRY TO HELP.

HOPE THIS HELPED A BIT.

CABLE GUY

Feb 13, 2008 | Onkyo TX-SR605 Receiver

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FIOS TV, audio static with HDMI connection I have been having this problem for months and the only thing VZ tech support has done is send me a new STB each time and the problem still remains. I have a STB+DVR in our family room which works fine. I have a second STB with my home theater system which is having this issue (this is just an STB and not a DVR). Connections for this second STB: 1. This STB Coax out is connected to an old analog TV. This works fine, no issues. 2. The HDMI out goes to my LG DVD player **bleep** home theater system HDMI in. This is where the problem is. When I watch any FIOS program whether live or recorded on the main DVR, the video signal is fine but the audio has static and is raspy. I have done multiple reboots on the multiple STBs Verizon has sent me and hasnt solved the problem. I can watch DVDs, Netflix, Roku apps on this home theater system through HDMI and they have crystal clear audio, no issues. So I know the problem has to be with the Verizon STB. Settings and things I have tried: 1. Dynamic range = none 2. Audio = surround (have tried the others mono and stereo also) 3. Volume = fixed, variable etc no impact 4. The HDMI cables are high quality with gold connectors. I have tried multiple cables, static remains. 5. I placed the STB box on an old wooden cutting board to ensure there is no other metal contact that might lead to static 6. I connected the STB audio out components (red and white) to the audio in on my home theater system and the audio was perfect Any suggestions? It is really irritating to watch programs with audio static. There is no source of electromagnetic radiation in the vicinity other than normal ambient.

Feb 28, 2017 | LG LHB977 Theater System

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