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Help with digital camera!

I need a new digital camera that:

1. is less than $250
2. has great zoom (16-18)
3. no shutter delay (must be very fast)

i was wondering if you recommend any particular camera - i've been looking all over

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Hey xrebecca26,
I am assuming you are referring to zoom range of the lens when you say 16-18. Finding a camera with a 16-18x zoom range for $250 or less is going to be difficult to do, but BestBuy.com does have the Canon sx100is in your price range and it has a 10x optical zoom. As far as shutter delay goes most new camera's do a pretty good job at this I would suggest just trying it out before you buy the camera. Shutter delay is caused by the camera having a small buffer where the images are temporarily stored while the camera writes the images to your memory card. Buying a memory card with a fast write speed should greatly reduce shutter delay. I hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

Posted on Jun 05, 2008

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Are your pictures properly exposed and are they sharp or are your pictures degraded? Is that 1/3-second you describe a delay between the time you push the shutter release and the time the picture is taken or somthing else? Check to make sure you're in the proper shutter release mode (slider switch to right of the mode dial). Also, your self-timer may be turned on. Your camera allows you to set a 2 or 10 second delay from the menus. If it is set to 2 seconds and turned on, it might seem like a 1/3-second delay. If that doesn't help, you camera is covered by Nikon's warranty. Contact Nikon Service at 1-800-NIKON-US (1-800-645-6687) 9AM-8PM EST, Monday to Friday.

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Not sure what you are really asking here as it would depend on the settings you have selected to use.

For instance if your ISO ) ASA film speed) is set to 64 and you have an aperture priority setting of say 6 then the shutter will go clllllllllickkkkk ( be slow say 1/30th of a second. As opposed to say ISO of 200 and an aperture of 16 the camera will go cliick now if you select ISO 400 and aperture of 16 the camera will clk This is the "sports type setting for fast moving objects ) I am presuming daylight average light for the above
after 4pm or in some shade areas shutter speed can also be delayed and the picture result is blurred due to camera shake at low speeds.
then u need a tripod

Now what have you selected as an amateur snapshot artist?
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Any of these settings on auto will also be delayed depending on ISO and the amount of ambiant light available to the camera. So you need to get to know your cameraq by practice

Some settings ( see manual) suggest using shutter priority to get good pics
Others suggest aperture priority.

It might be better for you to get a basic digital photography book to help you understand and compose good pics ( Digital photography for dummies ( or DP basics)


Hers a tip worth remembering with apertures

Smaller the number larger the hole(aperture)
Larger the number smaller the aperture

larger hole for lower light
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so experiment with aperture to be familiar on what to select for the degree of light then test different ISO speeds and keep notes.

When you use zoom increase the EV by 1+ and see what the difference is to standard distance

All great fun and learning and now cheaper because you dont have to pay for film or development to see what creative pics you have made!

So perhaps the camera does not have a problem, it just has you, and

you need to bond so Good Luck and ,many happy snappy hours of fun


Please rate my help++++Thanks for using FIXYA

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Without seeing the image, it's difficult to pinpoint the problem. But, going on the description you've described here, my guess would be that your shutter speed is too low to record any movement sharply, or is recording movement you are making while holding the camera. Some things that you may want to review with the camera to ensure that you're shooting the images correctly:

First, if you can look at the image using a photo editing program, see if you can review the EXIF (also called metadata) file and look at the exposure. Generally, anything under 1/30th of a second will show motion blur introduced from hand-holding the camera. If the shutter speed is below this, you should consider using a higher ISO setting or opening the apperture (this equates to a lower "F" number, so "F4" allows in LESS light than "F2.8") to allow more light into the lens. Remember that doubling the ISO will allow you to make an exposure with HALF the light. The down side to this is that higher ISO settings, particularly in Point and Shoot cameras, introduce higher levels of noise.

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