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Question whats a power supply?

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Its a square box inside the tower of your pc the part that your power cord plugs into

Posted on Jun 03, 2008

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Atx100-5 power supply


What is your issue with the ATX100-5 power supply? This is a 100W power supply may have been sold under the brand Bestec or a OEM name in an HP computer. This power supply will probably not run any current computers. There are a few vendors listed on Google that have the power supply in stock. However, it's a rare power supply now. Replacing it with a 230-250 W ATX power supply may be easier.

Cindy Wells

Mar 30, 2012 | PC Desktops

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Computer wont boot up,


what computer? when you say added new power supply what state was the computer in before you added power supply ? do you know the new supply is a good one ?
S

Jan 24, 2012 | Shuttle PC Desktops

1 Answer

If the red light on Compaq Evo D510 P4 keeps on blinking and the PC wont start when you try to power your PC then whats the problem ?


Power Supply.

Weak voltage power rail, or more than one.

(There are three power rails for the Power Supply used in your computer;
1) The 3.3 Volt power rail
2) The 5 Volt power rail
3) The 12 Volt power rail.

Wires with Orange insulation carry 3.3 Volts
With Red insulation carry 5 Volts
With Yellow insulation carry 12 Volts.

Each wire is connected to one power rail in the Power Supply.
{All Black wires are Ground wires}

The Power Supply in your computer is an SMPS. Switched-Mode Power Supply,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply )

I don't know what form factor your Power Supply is because you didn't state which model it is.
Small Form Factor (SFF)
or
Convertible Mini-Tower
or
Ultra Slim Desktop

Post additional questions in a Comment. Also state what model your Compaq Evo D510 is.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Jul 03, 2011 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

What size power supply would fit an e-Machines EL 1333G-03-W Desktop. How high of wattage can the board take?


Your computer came from the factory with a very tiny 220 watt power supply that is about as small as it gets. This is what you get with inexpensive computers and the failure rate is always high as the power supply is usually over worked trying to keep up with the power needs of the pc. The board will use no more power than it needs so you can install a high quality power supply. So I would recommend you install at least a 400 watt power supply and a 500 watt would be even better. Just buy a power supply compatible with your PC. Here is one good source for power supplies. http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/Category/guidedSearch.asp?CatId=106&name=Power-Supplies

Jan 05, 2011 | eMachines EL1333G03w (884483010820) PC...

2 Answers

Blue button flashes and green light in the back stays on. When I unplug power source, the blue light still flashes for another 10 seconds. When it shuts off completely, I plug it back in--then it...


Power Supply failure. Weak Voltage power rail.

Blue light in the front is the Power On LED light. Green light in the back is on the Power Supply.

Primer:

When a Power Supply is plugged into power, there is a 5 Volt Standby power present in the Power Supply.

When you press the Power On button, this in turn presses against a Power On switch.

The Power On switch is located inside the plastic Power On button.
This is a basic example of a Power On switch,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

Pressing the Power On switch closes a circuit for the 5 Volt Standby power.
The 5 Volt Standby power is then directed to a circuit inside the Power Supply.

This action turns the Power Supply on.
Power then goes from the Power Supply to the motherboard.
The first chip to receive power is the BIOS chip.

[Chip and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_circuit

BIOS = Basic Input/Output System ]

The BIOS chip has the BIOS program burned into it.

BIOS, (The BIOS program), looks to see what devices are installed, does a Ram Memory count, TURNS the Processor on, and hands the computer over to the operating system.

(Windows XP is one example of an O/S. Operating System)

Secondly,
1) ALL of the LED lights, use less than 1 Watt of power from the Power Supply.

[ The HP Pavilion a1250n desktop computer, comes with an ATX style of Power Supply, which has a reported Maximum Wattage rating of 300 Watts]

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts

3) A typical Processor uses 51 to 125 Watts. Depends on what Processor it is.

[The HP Pavilion a1250n comes an AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+
This particular Processor uses (Fits into), a Socket 939 processor socket.

The Athlon 64 X2 3800+ can use up to 89 Watts.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_AMD_Athlon_64_microprocessors#Athlon_64_X2

Look under TDP.

This is what a Socket 939 processor socket looks like,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_939 ]

You have enough power to light those simpy LED lights, and spin the fans a few times, but not enough power to Turn the Processor on, and keep it on.

No Processor running, No computer.

What causes Power Supply failure?

1) Computer is dirty inside, as well as inside the Power Supply.

In reference to the Power Supply;
The Power Supply used in your computer is an SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smps

There are two cooling components,
A) The Fan
B) Heatsink's which are used internally. (Inside)

[Typical construction of a Heatsink is a plate of metal with tall, thin fins protruding from it.
The plate of metal absorbs heat, from whatever object it is placed against.
The tall, thin fins absorb the heat from the plate of metal, and radiate the heat away.

If a fan is used in conjunction with a Heatsink, the air flow from the fan goes in-between the fins, and around the fins, and help to dissipate, (Carry away), the heat ]

When the Fan's blades, center hub, and surrounding cage (Shroud) are clogged with 'Gunk', the Power Supply heats up.

Heat = Wasted Energy

The more heat, the more the Power Supply strains to keep up with the call for power.
Eventually components inside the Power Supply fail, and the Power Supply fails.

2) Low quality Power Supply.
Low quality components are used in the Power Supply

The ATX style of Power Supply is used in a Large percentage of computers out there.
Very readily available.

I would suggest you install a Power Supply with more Wattage.
A computer only uses the power it needs, and NO more.
Won't hurt your computer.

Will help your computer as there will be less strain on the Power Supply.
Also the 300 Watt rating on that Power Supply is bunk.
Padded rating to make the Power Supply look better than it is.

The actual Wattage rating, is more like 60 to 70 percent of what is stated.
(180 Watts to 210 Watts)

Need help in opening your computer case, and replacing the Power Supply, and/or a recommendation for a Power Supply, let me know in a Comment.

[BE SURE to follow Anti-Static Precautions, BEFORE you reach inside your unplugged from power, computer ]

Jun 26, 2010 | HP Pavilion a1250n (EG194AA) PC Desktop

1 Answer

Where can I find the spec of the ptgd-vx sony Vaio


Not sure really what you are asking.
As a general rule, I use a 350-400 watt power supply in my systems.
This is adequate power for most modern machines (gaming machines would be higher). The motherboard doesn't care what size power supply you put into the machine. It gets the same voltage from any of them. The power supply must have the proper power plugs to fit the motherboard, however. All modern power supplies will have what you need.
Check out your graphics card, too. It may require power from the power supply.

If this helps, be sure to rate the answer, please.

Mar 14, 2009 | Sony PC Desktops

1 Answer

I have a Gateway 510xl and would like to upgrade the power supply


Changing out power supplies is not that difficult task. Upgrading to a 550 Watt power supply would be a good idea because it will give you more power than you need at the moment. You can google the power supply with the word problems with it and see what comes up. The main thing to be sure of when selecting a new power supply is to make sure that you get one with the appropriate connectors for your hard drive, motherboard and processor. For example if you have a SATA Hard drive then you will need a PSU that has SATA power connectors. Most newer power supplies (PSU) have these. The box should list what connectors it has.

Mar 12, 2009 | Gateway 510 XL Peak Performance (510XLPP)...

1 Answer

Have a gateway E2000 want to rebuild,


the e2000 has a speacial type of power supply. Replaces Gateway E2000 power supplies that use "Nina" chassis. http://www.atxpowersupplies.com/180-watt-power-supply-FSP180-51NIV-GW.php is a power supply i would suggest getting.

Dec 16, 2008 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

Hey man hows it going


Have you test the power supply for voltage, Is it good, if it is then the problem of course is not power supply. Some power supplies have a light on them. Also does the power supply fan work, If not almost always sure sign power supply is gone. Old power supplies are still available Every time I junk a computer P4 or older I save to power supply, What wattage?

Jul 10, 2008 | Gateway GT4010 (RBGT4010) PC Desktop

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