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V8043F motorized heating zone valve operates, but its end switch stays open. What is wrong?

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  • STARB Oct 14, 2010

    Is there the way to change the end switch alone keeping the motor or to examine the actuator for possibly not hitting the switch?

  • STARB Oct 14, 2010

    Not exactly as you described. The valve opens and closes following the thermostat all the time. However, its end switch that's supposed to close once the valve opens up, never does so, like with other zone valves. As a result the controller doesn't see the call for the heat and, therefore, the circulator and the boiler/furnace, remain off. I wonder if there is way to replace the end switch w/o changing the motor because I am not sure if I can change the entire head.
    If changing the entire electrical portion (head) takes not much more than taking 4 screws off the base, please let me know that and will gladly accept your solution.

  • STARB Oct 14, 2010

    Thanks. You solution is what i was looking for. I will swap the heads with zone I have little use for now and then get a proper replacement.

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I hope I understand this issue correctly.

You are saying, that your zone valve motor runs when the thermostat tells it to run, but the switch does not move, and the valve stays open?

If that is what you mean, then it sounds like either some teeth on one of the gears broke, and or gears have come out of alignment. At any rate, even tho the motor is operating it is not manipulating the valve. The valve is probably okay, but the motorized unit may need replacing.

Posted on Oct 14, 2010

  • Don Reiman Oct 14, 2010

    Most zone valves come as complete units. You will have to go to a plumbing supply to see if they have just the power head in stock.

    If you can get a power head that is compatible with the valve you have, for instance, if you have a honeywell valve, you need a honeywell head. If you have a TACO, you need a TACO head etc. When you go to the plumbing supply, if you can, remove the power head before you go, and bring it with you. If you cannot get a compatible power head the whole zone valve will need to be replaced.

    Remove and replace power head as follows.....

    Shut off the furnace. Make sure there is no power to the head. Drain the pipe. There should be no water in the pipe. This is important. If there is any water, or pressure in the line, you could get burned. So make certain there is no pressure or water in the pipe when you go to change the power head.

    Once you have drained the pipe, you can remove the 4 screws, depending on how old and what make the valve is, and the assembly will come out. You will See the the ball and flange. Now you will be able to see if it is the ball that is damaged. If it is, this is one reason a zone valve does not close. If not there is something damaged in the gear assembly.

    When you put the new head on make note of the dimples on one side of the power head that will line up with the rest of the valve, these make sure you don't put it together backwards.

    Once the new head is on, and secured in place, you may refill your system, and give it a test.

    So basically 4 screws, but you must drain your system.

    If you need to replace the entire unit....

    Drain the system as explained before for the same reasons. Important for safety. remove the power head as previously explained. Cut the copper pipe as close to the valve as possible.

    You will have to sweat in a new piece of copper. Get a repair pipe. It is a small length of copper, that is just big enough to fit snugly over your existing copper.

    Cut a few inches of copper off of one side of where the valve was. sand the existing pipe on one side, flux both the pipe and the valve, and put the valve on one side of the existing copper. There should be a few inches of space between the other side of the valve and the other side of the valve.

    Using a pipe cutter, cut off about 2 inches of copper from the piece you cut off. Sand it, then flux it and put it in the other side of the zone valve. Sand and flux the end of the copper that is not connected to the valve a few inches. Take the repair pipe and slide it over the existing pipe that is not connected to the valve that you just fluxed. This is why you cut a few inches out. So you can get the repair pipe on, then slide it over the 2 inch piece you put into the other side of the zone valve.

    Now its time to sweat it together. Using a propane, or MAPP torch heat the first joint. Heat the pipe all the way around. Once the joint is hot enough, take the solder while still applying heat and touch it to where the joint is. It should **** in the solder. Do this all the way around the joint. Do this to all of the joints making sure the solder has filled the joint all the way around at each joint.

    Once you are done you may put the power head on the valve after it has cooled. it is important that it is cool so you don't melt the gaskets. Fill your system and check for leaks. If you find a leak, heat it up with the torch and ad more solder. Make sure if the leak is at one of the joints of the zone valve, that you remove the power head before heating.

    Once you are sure there are no leaks you are good to go.


    If you have to replace the entire unit, I can give even more specific instruction on how to sweat in the new valve, with illustrations. Just contact me directly through fixya.

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Hello my name is Heath it will be my pleasure to assist you. The zone valve power head is probably bad even though the zone valve operates the zone as far as opening and closing if the powerhead is bad then the end switch will not make.

Posted on Oct 14, 2010

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You need a new Honeywell Zone Valve and you are confused by the different numbers of the valves. Let me explain a bit to help you sort through the differences.

The first thing is the V8043 number. This number is the same for the straight through two way valve body configurations. The next letter for most heating system zone valves is the one that is confusing sometimes. Usually it will be an E or a F. There are other Letters but they are not nearly as common for home heating.

This is the E valve

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This is the F valve

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The thing to remember here is that the E letter tells you that the zone valve has the 4 - 18” wires coming out of the motor. And the F letter tells you that the motor has the 5 terminal board on it. They can be interchanges but if you have one type already installed and you go to replace it you will have to do some figuring to know how to hookup the motor correctly. If you replace your valve with the same letter valve you will just be able to hook it up again as it was.

Then, as far as the last four numbers go, they just tell you what size pipe the valve is for.
If you need to replace the zone valve motor you can check the pricing for a replacement motor or complete head, but I have found that many times the best pricing will be to buy the whole valve and then just take the head off of the new valve and switch it with the old one.

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3894275-manual_honeywell_find_honeywell_manuals

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The Honeywell V8043F1036 zone valve is a simple two way on-off low voltage valve that consists of two parts. There is an actuator that has a motor and an end switch, and then there is the valve assembly that controls the flow of the water.

d6a6ab0.jpg

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In the event of an actuator failure the motor or the whole actuator can be replaced without removing the valve or draining the system. The replacement process is very easy and can be performed in a matter of minutes. The process only requires the loosening of two screws and the change over of the wiring.

The V8043F1036 Honeywell zone valve is one of the most common zone valves installed on many hydronic hot water heating systems. This zone valve has been a rock solid staple in the heating industry for many years.

There are some failures in these valves after years of use. The most common things that go wrong are the failure of the motor and the wearing out of the gears inside to the point where they skip and do not open the valve. The end switch will give problems on rare occasions.

Overall after installing hundreds of these valves I rate them as one of the best zone valves on the market. They are easy to install and service. Considering the wear and tear that a zone valve receives the total number of failures seen with these valves is very minimal

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3901905-honeywell_v8043e_v8043f_zone_valve

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3894275-manual_honeywell_find_honeywell_manuals

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EITHER ZONE VALVE RELAY HAS A BAD RELAY CUBE OR YOUR ZONE VALVE POWERHEAD IS BAD .YOU CAN GET JUST A REPLACEMENT POWERHEAD ASSEMBLY OR EVEN JUST A REPLACEMENT ZONE VALVE MOTOR . CHECK WITH A METER AND SEE IF YOU HAVE 24 VOLTS COMING OFF END SWITCH OF ZONE VALVE AND ALSO MAKE SURE YOU ARE GETTING 24 VOLTS TR AND TH/TR .

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e2ca636.jpg

It is a simple two way on-off low voltage valve that consists of two parts. There is an actuator that has a motor and an end switch, and then there is the valve assembly that controls the flow of the water.

The actuator contains a small 24v synchronous motor to open the valve and hold it open as long as power is supplied to the motor. When power is turned off the spring loaded return pulls the valve back shut. The power to the motor can be control through any low voltage thermostat. Power consumption is only 7.7va so up to 6 valves can be controlled from one 40va transformer. The actuator also has a manual open feature that allows you to manually open the valve in the event of a power failure. The valve will then return to normal operation when the power is restored.

In the event of an actuator failure the motor or the whole actuator can be replaced without removing the valve or draining the system. The replacement process is very easy and can be performed in a matter of minutes. The process only requires the loosening of two screws and the change over of the wiring.

The valve assembly is normally a straight through design that is built in such a way so that the valve can be installed without disassembly. The simple ball design is such that the ball is suspended inside the valve without touch any metal in the fully open position. This allows the valve to be soldered in the piping fully assembled. Each time the valve is opened and closed the ball is turned slightly which keeps dirt from building up at one spot and creating a leak. This also allows for even wear on all surfaces and therefore this valve virtually does not ever wear out from use.

There are some failures in these valves after years of use. The most common things that go wrong are the failure of the motor and the wearing out of the gears inside to the point where they skip and do not open the valve. The end switch will give problems on rare occasions.

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1 Answer

I have a Weil-McLain hot water boiler for baseboard heat. The system has one circulator pump. The system has 5 zones - 3 work fine and two are not working. All the zone valves and thermostats are...


Hello.Prob#1 valve has a bad END SWITCH,change the power head,thad brings the circ on when open.Prob#2 try manual overide lever.iS IT TIGHT OR SMOOTH?DOES IT JUMP/SNAP?motor very hot? all bad signs.Change that power head too.The transformers are OK because 1 trans can only run 3 valves max.

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I have a red and a white wire but the heater wont


It sounds like you have at least 2 zones in your system. If this is a normal hot water boiler system with zone valves. When you have your thermostat call for heat it closes the 24 volt circuit that then energizes the motorized zone valve for that thermostat. In that motorized zone valve there is an end switch that will close and complete the circuit to the boiler. Zone valves when they start to clog up with mineralization will not allow the motor to go far enough to close the end switch, so then the boiler and circulating pump will not come on. If this is the case then you need to have the zone valve replaced.
Also make sure your wires at the thermostat are connected correctly. One thing you could also check at the thermostat to make sure it works or not is to jumper the 2 wires and see if your system starts up or not. If the system starts up then the thermostat or its subbase is defective. Hope I was of help to you!! Good luck!!

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For a Honeywell, or other motorized Zone Valve, power again goes from the transformer, through the thermostat and into one side of the motor contacts/wires (depending on brand), the other motor wire goes back to the transformer, (24v common) Then the two end switch contact/wires go back to the T T terminals on the aquastat.

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