Question about Sony Alpha DSLR-A100 Digital Camera

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On all my Scenery shots there are clear round consistent spots on photos. These 4 spots only show up on sky, ocean, & light scenes. They are consistently in the same spot. Also showed up on a Brides White Dress. What can I do to fix this.....Oh one more fact....I changed out my 3 lenses and it shows up on all three, so it's definitely the camera body problem.

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You have dust on the sensor. Google the words "cleaning a DSLR sensor" and you will find sites explaining the procedure with pictures and where you can get the supplies necessary. It may sound complicated and scary but in reality it's very easy.

Posted on Oct 14, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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PICTURES ARE BLACK


6 Ways To Fix Too Bright and Too Dark Photos

Recompose The Photo This is probably the simplest solution. When taking a photo of a scene with very bright and very dark parts, move your camera to eliminate one of the extremes. In the case of the band, I would have either closed the curtains for the shot, or recomposed completely and photographed from the window looking at the band, and the crowd behind.
Use Exposure Lock If you can't recompose the photograph, instead tell the camera what part of the image you would like to see. The rest of the photo will be either over or under exposed (too bright or too dark) but at least you will see your subject. You can dothis by placing the center of the image at your subject; half depressing the shutter to lock the focus and exposure; move the camera to re-compose the image; and fully depressing the shutter.
In the band image, the camera chose to correctly expose the scene outside, but even if the band member had been correctly exposed, the window would have ended up being over exposed and you would just have seen white.
Some cameras have an option called 'spot metering' to set the part of the image you'd like to be correctly exposed. If your camera has this setting, enable it before using the technique above.
Use Fill In Flash If your scene has a sunny background, but your subject is in the shade (or has a hat on), turn on the flash (as I explained way back in tip number 9 - Using Flash During The Day). I know it seems wrong but it really does work! By using the flash, your subject will look as bright as the background. This would have worked well for the child shot above.
High Dynamic Range Imaging This technique is not for the faintof hearted. It requires a subject that does not move; a good camera with the capability to set the exposure and output RAW images. A tripod and image editing software like Photoshop CS3 are also needed.
High Dynamic Range Imaging (or HDR for short) is a technique for placing both very dark and very light areas in the same photo. It requires you to take a number of photographs of thesame scene - each with a different exposure. First take the shot using the camera's recommended settings. Then, in manual mode and keeping the aperture at the same value as the first shot, take a sequence of shots - each shot having a different shutter speed (above and below the original). You'll have 5-9 shots of the same scene all in different exposures.
hdrunder.jpghdrmean.jpghdrover.jpg
Merging the three images to the left creates the HDR image below. Thanks to Photomatix for the images.
hdrmerged.jpgNow import these into your favorite paint program. I use Photoshop, but you can as easily use a cheaper program designed specifically for HDR photos like Photomatix. Follow the HDR directions and the paint program will merge these images into one great looking shot!
Use a Filter If your scene is of a brightsky and a dark ground (for instance at sunset, or on a cloudy day), you can use a graduated neutral density filter. This filter cuts out someof the light from one part of the photo (the sky). This will correctly expose the ground and the sky without needing to use HDR. These filterscan be complex to setup, so I don't usually recommend them for beginners.
Fix The Original Photo in an Image Editing Program twobright2.jpgFinally, if you can't take another shot at the same location, you can fix the original image by changing the levels using a paint program. This works best when your subject is darker than the rest of the photo (because cameras lose detail in over-bright areas). I've brightened the band member in the top image using this technique and while it looks okay in thissmall shot, this technique can tend to amplify any noise in the image. The darker the subject, the harder time you will have fixing the image.
I discuss exactly how to use this technique in lesson 2 of my free Image Editing Secrets course. I have a tutorial for Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Paint Shop Pro and the free Google Picassa.
- See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/140/6-ways-to-fix-too-bright-and-too-dark-photos/#sthash.58eENOTt.dpuf

Jul 09, 2014 | Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

2 Answers

I would like to be able to take a good picture of a full moon on a clear night.


You're going to face two separate problems here.

One, the moon occupies a rather small portion of the night sky. Even fully zoomed in, the moon is going to be not much more than a bright spot in the sky.

Two, the camera is designed to assume that almost every scene is an average brightness. Given how much of the scene is a black sky, the camera will attempt to render the sky as average (what photographers call a "medium gray"). This will result in a picture with a gray sky and a featureless white blob for the moon.

If you think about it, the full moon is nothing more than a really big rock under a midday sun. Thus what you want is the same exposure as when taking a picture on a clear sunny day. Unfortunately the camera is going to be fooled by all that dark sky and try to compensate for it. What you really need is to be able to bypass the camera's light meter and set the proper exposure yourself. The C195, unlike more sophisticated cameras, doesn't allow you to do so. Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

Mar 24, 2013 | Kodak C195 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Can I take clear good pictures of a full moon on a clear night?


You're going to face two separate problems here.

One, the moon occupies a rather small portion of the night sky. Even fully zoomed in, the moon is going to be not much more than a bright spot in the sky.

Two, the camera is designed to assume that almost every scene is an average brightness. Given how much of the scene is a black sky, the camera will attempt to render the sky as average (what photographers call a "medium gray"). This will result in a picture with a gray sky and a featureless white blob for the moon.

If you think about it, the full moon is nothing more than a really big rock under a midday sun. Thus what you want is the same exposure as when taking a picture on a clear sunny day. Unfortunately the camera is going to be fooled by all that dark sky and try to compensate for it. What you really need is to be able to bypass the camera's light meter and set the proper exposure yourself. The C195, unlike more sophisticated cameras, doesn't allow you to do so. Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

Mar 24, 2013 | Kodak Easyshare C195 14 Mega Pixels...

1 Answer

My KDS-55A2000 displays some shades of blue as green. It's not just one area of the screen but the entire screen. Flesh tones can be adjusted to look pretty normal but scenes with light blue sky look...


Your t con board is responsible for the image on your screen. Your colors are all there but they are f---ed up in certain scenarios.

That is the only board on your set that be causing this anomaly.

Apr 30, 2017 | Sony KDS55A2000 55" HDTV

1 Answer

The flash on my camera will not turn on no matter what I do. The flash button won't bring up a flash menu or anything. Any suggestions?


Flash is deactivated in motion picture mode, scenery, night scenery, sunset, highsens, starry sky, fireworks or aerial photo in scene mode.

Jul 23, 2010 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ8 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Spots showing on photo's


Hi,

Try using a sensor cleaning kit. It sound if you have dust on your sensor. The cleaning kit most probably will solve your problem.

Cheers

Sep 28, 2009 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

Canon np6012f, all lights work, no trouble lights are on, yet copies come out blank, no image at all. Suggestions? Copies are coming out blank. Toner is not the problem, drum roll is not indicated.


How do you do. The Problem clear. This simply, back two questions. The First. The Scene is copied with transverse white band? Zdelayte check. She consists in following. You Do the copy and switch off the main by breaker just when sheet under drum. Afterwards remoove the drum. or see on it. If on drum scene by parts no, well test for newspaper, that question locked. Exactly, your бврабан came out of building, more exactly light on bright light, sun.Change the drum. Good luck you!

Sep 14, 2009 | Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

CAMERA IS THREE MONTHS OLD. ON MY LAST OUTING I NOTICED A PERFECT CIRCLE SPOT ONLY IN SHOTS OF THE SKY. THE SPOT IS IN THE IDENTICAL PLACE ON ALL SKY SHOT PHOTOS NO MATTER WHAT FOCAL LENGHT IS USED. THE...


If you have another lens, switch it and take some shots of the sky. If the spot is gone, it probably was the lens that needs cleaning/servicing. However, it's more likely that there's dirt on your CCD. On your camera's menu, select mirror lockup/clean CCD (I can't remember the exact terminology but you get the idea).

After you select that, the mirror will stay up. Remove the lens and you'll see that the CCD is now exposed. Use a blower (don't use your mouth to blow as you will end up with spit in the camera) to clear out any dust/debris on the CCD. Don't touch the CCD.

Turn off the camera and you'll hear the mirror go back down. Re-attach your lens and try some shots.

Apr 13, 2009 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera with 28-135mm...

3 Answers

DS Exposure Question


I haven't found any underexposure problems with my DS. The only "underexposure-thing" I found is that when it's sun reflections within the image (from water, cars with metallic paint and other highly reflective surfaces) the camera will underexpose to avoid blowing out the highlights. In complex lighting situations with many dark and bright areas, it will expose to retain texture in the shadows but still without burning out the highlights. The only image-processingt that I sometimes needs to do, is to lift up the midtones. The darker tones and the bright tones are in most caes exposed just the way I would do it myself if I was a camera, but the midtones can be off. Now, this is not a fault in the camera - it's an effect of the limited dynamic range that digital has in comparision with film. Lighten up the midtones without affecting exposure of dark and bright areas, is image processing and has nothing to do with exposure settings.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Exposure control options


The following exposure options are available: P (Program auto), A (Aperture priority), S (Shutter priority), and M (Manual). There are four scene programs modes available in which the camera will choose the optimal settings for the picture: Landscape: Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. Both the foreground and the background are in focus. Since blues and greens are reproduced vividly in this mode, the landscape mode is excellent for shooting natural scenery. Portrait: Suitable for shooting a portrait-style image of a person. This mode features an in-focus subject against a blurred background. Sports: Suitable for capturing fast-moving action such as sports scene or moving vehicles without blurring. Night scene: Suitable for taking night scene photos with a slower shutter speed.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-8080 Wide Zoom Digital...

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