Question about U-Line ULine BI2115B00 Black Echelon 15" Drain Free Ice Maker with 25 Pounds Daily Ice Production

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Our icemaker makes cubes, but leaks water from the ice tray area, creating a 2 inch block of ice in the bottom of the ice cube collection bin each night.

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Have a look at the manual on page 6 for adjustment procedure.

Also, your leak may be due to a water valve that is not able to turn off 100%. Valve replacement would be necessary. Unplug your icemaker electrical, and empty the ice. Leave the water turned on. If you keep getting water collecting in the bin, you are likely looking at a water valve replacement (not hard at all, just inconvenient).

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Ice maker stopped dispensing


Refrigerator - Icemaker Not Dispensing,or Not Making Ice Check that the feeler arm on the icemaker is in the down position and is not blocked. If the icemaker does not have a feeler arm make sure the icemaker paddle is not blocked under the icemaker. For more information on the causes of new icemakers not making ice. For more information on normal ice production. Side by Side models: The filter may be loaded with sediment that can cause low water pressure. The water pressure must be between 40 and 120 psi. Pressures below 40 psi may cause a malfunction of the icemaker (i.e. producing hollow cubes or no ice production). Test the water pressure: Dispense water from the dispenser into a large measuring cup for 20 seconds. If the measuring cup contains less than 13.5 ounces (400 metric centimeters), the water flow is inadequate. If the amount of water is less than 13.5 ounces then the refrigerator fails the test, remove the filter and test the refrigerator again with the by-pass plug in place. If the refrigerator dispenses the proper amount of water with the by-pass plug in place, then the filter should be replaced. If you no longer have the by-pass plug and it has been over three months since the filter has been replaced, you should replace the filter. If the refrigerator fails the test again and you know you have the proper water pressure in your home, you should call service to check the refrigerator. If the amount of water collected is over 13.5 ounces then the refrigerator passes the test and the dispenser is working correctly. Ice not Dispensing Due To Clumping Ice: Your dispenser may not be dispensing due to clumping ice cubes. The ice cubes in your icemaker may be clumping for a couple of reasons: Low food load: The defrost cycle radiates heat into the freezer. The ice in the freezer will naturally absorb the heat. This will cause the ice to melt slightly during defrost, then eventually freeze together in clumps. Increasing the food load in the freezer will buffer the warmth from the defrost cycle and keeps the ice from melting. Lack of use: When the ice bin is full, the pressure from the weight of the cubes can cause the bottom cubes to fuse and clump. To prevent this from happening, discard the clumped ice and check the bin periodically to ensure the ice is not building up. If you do not use a large amount of ice, move the feeler arm on the icemaker to the up position to turn off the icemaker and stop ice production. For more information on the causes of clumping cubes. If the ice bucket is not seated correctly, ice will not dispense properly. Make sure the ice bucket is in the correct position. Refer to Use & Care manual.

Aug 05, 2012 | Maytag Refrigerators

1 Answer

Fridge freezer, water inlet pipe keeps warming up


The home icemaker's predecessor was the plastic ice tray. It's fairly obvious how this device works: You pour water into a mold, leave it in the freezer until it turns to a solid and then extract the ice cubes. An icemaker does exactly the same thing, but the process of pouring water and extracting cubes is fully automated. A home icemaker is an ice-cube assembly line.

Most icemakers use an electric motor, an electrically operated water valve and an electrical heating unit. To provide power to all these elements, you have to hook the icemaker up to the electrical circuit powering your refigerator. You also have to hook the icemaker up to the plumbing line in your house, to provide fresh water for the ice cubes. The power line and the water-intake tube both run through a hole in the back of the freezer.

When everything is hooked up, the icemaker begins its cycle. The cycle is usually controlled by a simple electrical circuit and a series of switches.

At the beginning of the cycle, a timed switch in the circuit briefly sends current to a solenoid water valve. In most designs, the water valve is actually positioned behind the refrigerator, but it is connected to the central circuit via electrical wires. When the circuit sends current down these wires, the charge moves a solenoid (a type of electromagnet), which opens the valve.

The valve is only open for about seven seconds; it lets in just enough water to fill the ice mold. The ice mold is a plastic well, with several connected cavities. Typically, these cavities have a curved, half-circle shape. Each of the cavity walls has a small notch in it so each ice cube will be attached to the cube next to it.

Once the mold is filled, the machine waits for the water in the mold to freeze. The cooling unit in the refrigerator does the actual work of freezing the water, not the icemaker itself. The icemaker has a built-in thermostat, which monitors the temperature level of the water in the molds. When the temperature dips to a particular level -- say, 9 degrees Fahrenheit (-13 degrees Celsius) -- the thermostat closes a switch in the electrical circuit.

Closing this switch lets electrical current flow through a heating coil underneath the icemaker. As the coil heats up, it warms the bottom of the ice mold, loosening the ice cubes from the mold surface.

The electrical circuit then activates the icemaker's motor. The motor spins a gear, which rotates another gear attached to a long plastic shaft. The shaft has a series of ejector blades extending out from it. As the blades revolve, they scoop the ice cubes up and out of the mold, pushing them to the front of the icemaker. Since the cubes are connected to one another, they move as a single unit.

At the front of the icemaker, there are plastic notches in the housing that match up with the ejector blades. The blades pass through these notches, and the cubes are pushed out to a collection bin underneath the icemaker.

The revolving shaft has a notched plastic cam at its base. Just before the cubes are pushed out of the icemaker, the cam catches hold of the shut-off arm, lifting it up. After the cubes are ejected, the arm falls down again. When the arm reaches its lowest resting position, it throws a switch in the circuit, which activates the water valve to begin another cycle. If the arm can't reach its lowest position, because there are stacked-up ice cubes in the way, the cycle is interrupted. This keeps the icemaker from filling your entire freezer with ice; it will only make more cubes when there is room in the collection bin.

This system is effective for making ice at home, but it doesn't produce enough ice for commercial purposes, such as restaurants and self-service hotel ice machines. In the next section, we'll look at a larger, more powerful icemaker design.

There are any number of ways to configure a large, free-standing icemaker -- all you need is a refrigeration system, a water supply and some way of collecting the ice that forms.

One of the simplest professional systems uses a large metal ice-cube tray, positioned vertically.

In this system, the metal ice tray is connected to a set of coiled heat-exchanging pipes like the ones on the back of your refrigerator. A compressor drives a stream of refrigerant fluid in a continuous cycle of condensation and expansion. Basically, the compressor forces refrigerant through a narrow tube (called the condenser) to condense it, and then releases it into a wider tube (called the evaporator), where it can expand.

Compressing the refrigerant raises its pressure, which increases its temperature. As the refrigerant passes through the narrow condenser coils, it loses heat to the cooler air outside, and it condenses into a liquid. When the compressed fluid passes through the expansion valve, it evaporates -- it expands to become a gas. This evaporation process draws in heat energy from the metal pipes and the air around the refrigerant. This cools the pipes and the attached metal ice tray.

The icemaker has a water pump, which draws water from a collection sump and pours it over the chilled ice tray. As the water flows over the tray, it gradually freezes, building up ice cubes in the well of the tray. When you freeze water layer by layer this way, it forms clear ice. When you freeze it all at once, as in the home icemaker, you get cloudy ice.

After a set amount of time, the icemaker triggers a solenoid valve connected to the heat-exchanging coils. Switching this valve changes the path of the refrigerant. The compressor stops forcing the heated gas from the compressor into the narrow condenser; instead, it forces the gas into a wide bypass tube. The hot gas is cycled back to the evaporator without condensing. When you force this hot gas through the evaporator pipes, the pipes and the ice tray heat up rapidly, which loosens the ice cubes.

Typically, the individual cube cavities are slanted so the loosened ice will slide out on their own, into a collection bin below. Some systems have a cylinder piston that gives the tray a little shove, knocking the cubes loose.

This sort of system is popular in restaurants and hotels because it makes ice cubes with a standard shape and size. Other businesses, such as grocery stores and scientific research firms, need smaller ice flakes for packing perishable items. We'll look at flake icemakers next.

In the last section, we looked at a standard cube icemaker design. Flake icemakers work on the same basic principle as cube icemakers, but they have an additional component: the ice crusher. You can see how a typical flake system works in the diagram below.

Like the cube icemaker design we examined in the last section, this machine uses a set of heat-exchanging coils and a stream of water to build up a layer of ice. But in this system, the coils are positioned inside a large metal cylinder. Water passes through the cylinder, as well as around its outer edges. The passing water gradually builds up a large column of ice surrounding the cylinder from the inside and outside.

As with a cube icemaker, a solenoid valve releases hot gas into the cooling pipes after a set length of time. This loosens the ice column so it falls into the ice crusher below. The ice crusher breaks the ice cylinder into small pieces, which pass on to a collection bin.

The size of the ice bits depends on the crusher mechanism. Some crushers grind the ice into fine flakes, while other crushers produce larger, irregularly shaped ice chunks.

There are many variations on these designs, but the basic idea in all of them is the same. A refrigeration system builds up a layer of ice, and a harvesting system ejects the ice into a collection bin. At the most basic level, this is all there is to any icemaker.


Mercedes Custom parts

Jun 05, 2012 | Kenmore Fridge Freezer Ice Pan Part...

1 Answer

I have a samsung rfg297aars refrig. I believe the water is leaking from the ice maker into the cube tray and running out and freezing in the cube dispenser and it is freezing the cubes together and...


you need to check the flapper in the door where the ice comes out,, if you take the ice bin out look down in the hole where the ice comes out,, if it is not sealing good it will let warm air come up the chute and melt the ice,, if it is sealing good,, then you need to check and see if the water fill tube( the one that goes into the icemake) is not froze up or has asomething blocking it

Jan 19, 2011 | Samsung RFG297AARS (285 cu ft) Bottom...

1 Answer

How can I stop my icemaker from making a block of ice? At the front of the ice bin, a block of ice is forming as though wateer is drippping into the bin.


Open the freezer and remove the ice bucket. You should now see the tray were the ice cubes freeze, check to see if it is fractured or leaking and the position of the water outlet pipe to the ice tray. If the water pipe is firing water out of the tray just readjust it.

hope this helps you.

Jun 23, 2010 | GE Profile PSW26P Stainless Steel Side by...

1 Answer

I set the ice maker feature to make cubes with my samsung refrigerator rs2555sw. But the ice maker makes a ice chunk. All the cubes are frozen together with a flat and thick layer of ice on top..


Hi and welcome to Fixya.

Remove the front cover after the ice tray has dumped cubes and remove all of the water from your ice maker tray.

Then depress the test button on the bottom of the icemaker (in front on bottom) located about 1 inch from the lower rh corner.

The icemaker fill cycle should add just enough water to cover barely cover the tray. (see page 32 of the 25 Sept 2005 user's manual)

If it is overfilling the icemaker fill time / water level needs to be reduced on the ice maker module. A normal fill cycle is about 7.5 seconds.

Another thing that will cause larger cubes is high water supply (utility co) pressure.

A temporary fix would be to slowly close the refridgerator water supply line's shut off vavle so that the water flow restricts.

The real solution is to investigate ice maker fill time, and the function of the icemaker water supply solenoid vavle for possible Delayed closing of the internal diaphram.

Feb 06, 2010 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

I own a GE side by side refrigerator Model GSS22KGPD WW, Serial AG225890. This the third frig of the same model with the same identical problem. The ice cube dispenser on the door only gives crushed ice...


  •  if the cubes that the icemaker makes are full size then... the water valve on the back of the machine is usually the culprit in these cases. it will not close fast enough resulting in a little overflow of water into the auger assembly every time it makes ice. it only takes a little bit of water to settle in the bottom of the pan to cause problems. 
  • if the cubes are smaller than what you would expect then the water is leaking out right before it reaches the icemaker. either from the plastic tube behind the icemaker or the cup on the icemaker that funnels the water into the icemaker.
  • it also could be the timer inside the icemaker leaving the water valve on too long.
  • all these things can be tested on site. the service person must not be very well trained.
if you already checked this and think it is a different problem then let me know, i will help you figure it out. 
Mike  
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Jul 16, 2008 | GE Refrigerators

1 Answer

Water leaks into storage bin


open the machine control panel side and cube adjustable thermostat available in side,adjusted in the thermostat screw

Jun 22, 2008 | U-Line Icemaker

2 Answers

Ice Maker Freezing Up and Ice not dispensing


Check your ice cube tray to see if it is warped. Mine was. I took the tray off and dipped it into boiling water and remoulded it to the original shape and re-installed it. So far no problems. The tray gets warped because of the ice cube release mechanism. The tray is rotated around until it meets a block on one corner which creates the twisting motion we used to do on manual trays. Over time it tends to warp the tray. Good luck

Nov 26, 2007 | LG LRSC26925 Side by Side Refrigerator

1 Answer

My ice freezes together!


Do you mean the ice cubes are too large to be individual cubes and come out as a lump? The water is filled by a timed fill so if the fill solenoid stays open a little and drips water into the cube tray it will have more water than normal. I guess I'm not sure if you mean the ice cubes are stuck together in the tray or are they sticking together in the holding bin area?

Jan 30, 2007 | Kenmore 74172 / 74174 / 74179 Top Freezer...

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