Question about Yamaha Electric Guitar

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I have what I think is a Yamaha AE-11 hollow body electric guitar with a number 24440 etched into the bottom fret. I'm trying to verify year of manufacture, is it a 1974?

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Hi Fred,Probably I have the same guitar with reg. nr. 24592. A sunburst. Just like you I'm trying to find out in which year it was made. Until now I've found the year 1974. Some pages say these were made from 1967 till 1971. Others say from 1966 till 1974. I got mine second hand from somebody who got it as a present in the mid-seventies. So 1966 till 1974 seems accurate. Ithought about selling it, but now I've changed my mind and keep it forever. It' a beautifull guitar.Greatings GerritNetherlands

Posted on Jan 20, 2013

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What year is this guitar Univox hollow body electric model number 2124314


That might not be the correct model number. Check the body again. They usually have names.

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What wood and year ?


Neck Material: Mahogany- Neck Type: Artcore set-in- Body: Maple top/back/sides- Frets: Large frets- Fingerboard: Bound Rosewood- Inlay: Pearl dot inlay- Bridge: ART1 bridge- NeckPU: ACH-ST- BridgePU: ACH-ST- HW Color: CH- Width: Max width at lower bout: 15 3/4"- BodyThickness: Max body thickness: 3 5/8"
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Gibson serial number 002690328 is that a real number it looks like a les Paul classic. Help


Guitar Info Your guitar was made at the
Nashville Plant, TN, USA
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Gibson: Nashville Gibson's Nashville plant was opened in Tennessee 1974. All electric models and some acoustic models currently made at this factory. This facility has an average production rate of 220 guitars a day. Each guitar is built by hand and takes about 4 to 6 weeks to complete. Note: Most hollow and semi-hallow body guitars are made at a separate plant in Memphis Tennessee. This facility has an average production rate of 40 guitars a day.

Aug 03, 2014 | Music

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How to adjust truss rod on yamaha f335 guitar


Taken from http://www.learnguitarsetups.com


There are a few golden rules when adjusting your truss rod. First, only use the rod to keep your neck as straight as it needs to be...do not use it to adjust your action! Second, only use the proper tools. If you do not know what the proper tool is, check with the manufacturer. Truss rod nuts are easy to strip, and once they're stripped, they are expensive to fix! Finally, do not force anything; an eighth of a turn can make a drastic change. Remember, if the truss rod feels tight or doesn't seem to be doing anything, take it to a professional.

  1. Start by sitting with the guitar in the playing position.
  2. Tune it to pitch if it is not already.
  3. Capo the first fret. If you do not own a capo, you can use your fretting hand.
  4. Next, fret the bass string with your picking hand up near where the neck joins the body. This is typically around the 14th fret, but it may be higher up with some electric guitars. In our example, we'll be using the 20th fret.
  5. Use the string as a straightedge held against the neck which will either bow away, or against the string. This is how you determine the amount of relief in the neck. You can also use a steel ruler placed along the length of the neck, in the same manor.
  6. In our example, the approximate half way point between the 20th fret and the 1st, will be the 7th fret where we will observe the distance between the top of that fret and the bottom of the string (or ruler), as pictured. Notice the gap. Hint: Half way down the neck is often between the 7th-9th frets.
  7. If you have a gap between the top of the fret and the bottom of the string, you likely have a bowed neck. If there is no gap, it is likely either dead straight or back-bowed.

HOW MUCH TO ADJUSTThe bigger the gap, the more relief is in the neck. Normally, we want just a small amount of relief in the neck for optimal playing, about the same as the thickness of a business card or less.

If there is a gap, tighten the truss rod clockwise until you have something closer to what we're after. Slide a business card in between the top of fret and bottom of the string (or ruler). Make sure you are placing the card parallel with the string or ruler. If there is no gap, you may be either dead straight or back bowed, so you will need to loosen the truss rod counter-clockwise to get the results we are after. Hint: If the strings are buzzing in the first few frets and open strings, it is often a clear indication of a back bow.

Remember, do not force anything to get the results you are after. If it is hard to adjust or spins freely you may need professional assistance.

The final step in setting your relief is to test it out! If it feels better, you're done! But take note, straightening the neck may actually make your guitar play worse! Consequently, when the truss rod is tightened, the height of the strings are lowered, which can create string buzz if your guitar isn't setup properly to start. Likewise, it can make a poor fret condition more noticeable. So, if your guitar plays worse after adjusting the neck, it is either too straight for your playing style, or it is a sign that more work is needed. Thankfully, you can easily reverse the changes you've just made if required.



For pictures and further info, visit www.learnguitarsetups.com

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Dec 16, 2012 | Yamaha Music

1 Answer

Where do you find the model number and serial number on a Yamaha Electric Guitar?


the serial number is the model number and is usually stamped on the back of the head or on the metal plate that holds the neck to the body

Apr 18, 2011 | Yamaha Electric Guitar

1 Answer

I get static pops when playing my new Gretsch G5120. How can this be resolved?


First verify that OTHER guitars work flawlessly with the same cable and amp.

This is the season of low humidity and static discharges. These are usually reduced by raising humidity to 40% or greater.

Static develops from certain clothing and shoes rubbing and can discharge through the guitar cable as it builds up. If you can shuffle your feet and cause more static, then get some "Staticide" spray to spray on the floor where you perform.

I would NOT modify your guitar due to the value of it unless you find a broken ground wire someplace.

Mar 12, 2011 | Gretsch G6120 1959 Chet Atkins Hollow Body...

1 Answer

Guitar date of manafacture


What you have listed is an invalid serial number. If you go to:

http://www.yamaha.com/apps/guitararchives/guitarserial.htm

you can type in the serial number and get your answer.

Jun 06, 2010 | Yamaha Electric Guitar

2 Answers

Strings are very far away from the last frets on the neck...


Sometimes the truss rod (nut you are referring to) will do the trick. The truss rod runs under the fingerboard and allows you to give the neck relief or tension. Some truss rods are dual action but I'm guessing yours is designed simply to give basic relief of the neck. I would make sure the truss rod is adjusted properly before sanding down the saddle. If you sight down the neck you should be able to see the relief in the neck - just use the string as your straight-edge. Most guitars need a slight amount of relief but higher-end guitars can be almost straight (better fretwork.) Once the neck has been adjusted correctly you can move forward with the setup.

Make sure the nut is also the proper height. If the nut is too low (1mm height between bottom of string and first fret) you should get it replaced by someone capable of doing such a thing. If the nut height is okay I would suggest moving forward cautiously by sanding the bottom of the saddle. Make sure this is done patiently and carefully as it can drastically change the sound and playability of the guitar. Hardly any material needs to be taken off to lower the action just a little. Error on the side of not-enough than too much. Make sure the bottom of the saddle remains flat! If the bottom isn't flat the guitar can sound horrible and if there is an undersaddle pickup it might not pick up evenly. The easiest way to do so is to tape some sandpaper rough side up on a flat surface (just don't pick something like mom's heirloom or something important in case it gets scratched.

If you'd like more detail check out http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/Repairs2.htm

Good Luck!

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