Question about Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z3 Digital Camera

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Moon hi i have a black half moon shape in my pictures can you help

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The lens elements or aperature have become misaligned or stuck. You might try selecting various focus and digital/analog zoom mode settings.

Posted on Oct 15, 2008

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How to shoot pictures of the moon


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How to photograph the supermoon: an easy way to shoot moon ...

www.techradar.com/.../photography.../how-to-photograph-the-moon-an-easy-way-to-...
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4 days ago - Taking pictures of the moon is one of the more popular subjects in night photography - but it's also quite tricky to get right. Use this tried and ...

How to Photograph the Moon - Photography Life

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Jun 11, 2015 - Aperture: Set your aperture to f/11. Shutter Speed: Set your shutter speed to 1/125 on cameras with base ISO 100, and to 1/250 on Nikon DSLRs with base ISO 200. Lens Focus: Set your lens to manual focus (either through a switch on the lens or on the camera) and set your focus to infinity.

How To Take Stunning Pictures Of The (Super) Moon :: Digital Photo ...

www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/779/how-to-take-stunning-pictures-of-the-moon/
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Aug 7, 2014 - Start with ISO 200, f11 aperture and 1/125 second. Try a test shot. Then use trial and error by changing the shutter speed until you can find the best exposure that works for your composition without overexposing the moon. Turn off auto focus.

How-To: Photograph The Moon ' Popular Photography

www.popphoto.com/how-to-photography-moon
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4 days ago - Planning is a big part of all photography, and shooting the moon is no ... that much money on a lens like this to take impressive moon photos.
How to shoot pictures of the moon Google Search

Nov 15, 2016 | Digital Cameras

2 Answers

Taking pictures with x3 telephoto lens


may be there is some problem with your shutter speed and lens

Jun 18, 2008 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ50K Digital Camera

1 Answer

What is the best setting to take a picture of the moon


Without knowing the make and model of your camera I can't give you a definitive answer, but with most cameras you'll want to set it to manual and pretend you're shooting landscapes under a midday sun.

Camera exposure meters are designed to render the entire scene an average gray. Since most of your picture will likely be a dark sky, the camera will try to expose long enough to bring up the sky to an average gray, making the moon into a featureless white blob. Since you probably want to see the moon and don't care if the sky goes black, you want to expose for the moon.

The moon is just a big rock under a bright sun. There is an old rule for taking pictures under a bright sun called the "Sunny-16 Rule." This rule basically states that the proper exposure under this condition is an aperture of f/16 with a shutter speed of 1/ISO. So, if your camera is set to ISO of 200 then you set the aperture to f/16 and the shutter speed to 1/200 seconds, or any equivalent exposure such as f/11 and 1/400.

Digital cameras make this easier, since you can see the picture and adjust the exposure if it didn't come out right. Take a picture, zoom in on the moon, and see if you can see any details. Use the histogram if available. If the peak is at the right edge of the histogram then you're overexposing---reduce the exposure. You want the peak near the right edge but not touching it.

All this depends on the make and model of your camera. Many point&shoot cameras don't have a manual setting. In that case you're pretty much out of luck and you won't get a good picture of the moon.

May 08, 2014 | Digital Cameras

2 Answers

I would like to be able to take a good picture of a full moon on a clear night.


You're going to face two separate problems here.

One, the moon occupies a rather small portion of the night sky. Even fully zoomed in, the moon is going to be not much more than a bright spot in the sky.

Two, the camera is designed to assume that almost every scene is an average brightness. Given how much of the scene is a black sky, the camera will attempt to render the sky as average (what photographers call a "medium gray"). This will result in a picture with a gray sky and a featureless white blob for the moon.

If you think about it, the full moon is nothing more than a really big rock under a midday sun. Thus what you want is the same exposure as when taking a picture on a clear sunny day. Unfortunately the camera is going to be fooled by all that dark sky and try to compensate for it. What you really need is to be able to bypass the camera's light meter and set the proper exposure yourself. The C195, unlike more sophisticated cameras, doesn't allow you to do so. Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

Mar 24, 2013 | Kodak C195 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Intermittent blanking on pictures displayed


There's nothing wrong. The blinking areas are blown-out highlights. These are the portions of your picture that the camera thinks are overexposed.
While viewing the picture, press cursor-up/down to cycle through the different views of your picture.

May 06, 2012 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do i take picture of the moon


I assume you want a picture of the moon and don't particularly care what the sky looks like.
Consider a full moon. Just what are you taking a picture of? It's a landscape, right? Mountains, craters, etc. All under a bright midday sun without a cloud in the sky (the sky on the moon, not your sky). So what if the moon's a quarter of a million miles away from you, it's under the same sun. Yeah, it's a quarter of a million miles farther from the sun, but given the nearly one hundred million miles between the earth and the sun, the difference is negligible.
There's an old photography rule called the "Sunny-16 Rule." It says that the proper exposure under sunny conditions is f/16 at a shutter speed that is a reciprocal of the film's ISO rating. So, at ISO 200 the proper exposure would be f/16 at 1/200 second (or equivalent, such as f/11 at 1/400 second). You'll have to switch the camera to the Manual exposure mode to do this. Ignore anything the camera's light meter says.
Use this as a starting guideline. Take a picture and review it on the screen. Don't worry about the sky going pure black. You don't want the highlights to get blown out, or the moon will look like a white blob.

Feb 07, 2012 | Canon EOS 40D Digital SLR Camera Digital...

1 Answer

Hi When I try to take pictures of the moon at night, the all I get is bright light without any detail. The sensor seems overloaded and the image seems smudged. I have tried with the intelligent...


All automatic-exposure cameras try to render the scene as a middle gray. The moon is a small portion of the total image, so the camera concentrates on the sky. In trying to get enough light to make the sky go from black to gray, the moon gets completely overexposed. What you want is the moon properly exposed, even if that means the sky goes completely black.

For a full moon, you want the same exposure you would use at noon on a bright day. If you think about it for a moment, it becomes obvious. The full moon is simply a landscape at high noon. Unfortunately, the camera can't know that.

Set the camera to manual. Start with the "Sunny-16 Rule", which tells you to set the aperture to f/16 and the shutter speed to 1/ISO. So for example, set the ISO to 200, the aperture to f/16, and the shutter speed to 1/200. Look at the result on the screen and adjust the exposure as needed.

That was for a full moon. For other phases you may need to add exposure, but the "Sunny-16 Rule" will still give you a starting point.

Jun 18, 2011 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I live in the Florida Keys and going to try and take some photos of the supper moon tonight. What settings do you suggest for a Sony SLT-A55V. I tried to use my longer lens last night without a tripod...


Take you camera off the automatic exposure setting. Left to itself, the camera will try to make the black sky a middle gray. You want to treat the moon as a landscape under noon sun. If you think about it, that's all it is. The moon is simply a large rock or mountain, lit by the same sun you get at noon. This is where the "Sunny-16" rule comes in. The proper exposure for a full moon is an aperture of f/16 and a shutter speed of 1/ISO. For example, if your ISO is set for 200, the shutter speed should be about 1/200 second. Any equivalent exposure will work as well, for example f/11 at 1/400. You can then review the picture on your display and adjust accordingly. The sky will go pure black, but that's okay. You're not taking a picture of the sky, but of the moon.

Mar 20, 2011 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Only getting half a picture


My 4 year old S7000 just started the same thing. I read it is the CCD. I'm taking it in today.

Feb 10, 2008 | Fuji FinePix S7000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Picture images


If you cannot find a solution to your problem you may want to email fixityourself@gmail.com. He has good advice and good used parts at a fair price.

Oct 26, 2007 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-S40 Digital Camera

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