Question about Bushnell Tasco Telescope Galaxsee 525x60mm Refractor Telescope 46-060525

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How do you get around the small field of view

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You can't. This is a toy, not a real scope. The largest FOV is with your lowest power (biggest number) eyepiece.
If interested in wide field views, buy a GOOD telescope with a low focal ratio (below f/8)

Posted on Oct 11, 2010

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I have a side by side whirlpool E22DQ frig. Found thick greenish black mold growing around the ice dispenser. How can I get the small trim cover piece off so i can field-strip around the dispenser? What...


I would use warm water and vinegar. There are 2 small slots under the trim at the bottom, If you insert a small rigid pin in the slot on either side this will unlock the trim. Just pull toward you.

May 18, 2011 | Refrigerators

2 Answers

I need instructions for Jessops 800x80 astronomical telescope please


This is a refractor style telescope. You did not say if it is on an equitorial mount or an ALT AZ mount.

Read my TIPS on my profile page. You will not find a manual for that telescope. Objects in the night sky are tiny and many are very dim. Your scope has a VERY small field of view so the telescope must be pointed directly at the object or you will see nothing. Start by using the eyepiece with the largest number written on it. This is your lowest magnification and will have the widest field of view.

Join a local astronomy club and the members will help you.

Jan 29, 2011 | Optics

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Just had a konusmotor 500 telescope and have built it to the instructions, but nothing on how to use. only a beginner but how do you increase the size of the object you are looking at,eg the moon looks the...


Are you viewing the moon through the small finder scope on top of the main tube? That is only used for aiming the scope, and has very little magnification. The moon should fill the field of view on even the lowest magnification on the main scope.

A reflector type scope has the eyepiece mount on the side of the main tube, near the top end, pointing into the side of the scope. This mount should have an eyepiece placed in it- use the one with the biggest number to start with (that will have the least magnification). Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope. You look into the side of the tube with this type of scope, not along it.

New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. This scope has a motor to track the scope and keep objects in view, but you will have to get the scope set up for that for it to work correctly. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece to start. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 22, 2011 | Konusmotor 500 (230 x 114mm) Telescope

2 Answers

How do I increase the field of view on a zeiss OpMi-1?


Field of view and working distance vs magnification is a law of physics. Using the lowest power gives you the widest field of view and greatest working distance but the trade of is that you loose magnification. Conversely as you increase magnification you decrease working distance and you loose field of view diameter.
The optics of your microscope are limited to .4x to 2.5x magnification. Your working distance is limited to 200 - 400mm depending on the magnification you are using.
I am not aware of any interchangeable lenses for this scope.

Nov 28, 2010 | Zeiss Microscope

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Need a manual for tasco 56t sd don't know how to use it


Here is the manual:
http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:ANsyqHrcy1UJ:www.tasco.com/products/manuals/Tasco56TN-57TN-301051N-301004N-301005N.pdf+tasco+56tn+telescope+manual&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESiCAxnIsokVaYsESKffWHIqbDg7h3VF-AFm2iMHA2-oqpTo3PvVxpRjpalSqaBGlyl8BlkJZb049t8Ooz6AHNKb09ssXUCNiaRi4C2QND2EanE_73ROmmNcjC_KnD-RJOimbSpx&sig=AHIEtbT5bdFoxKc2OD1wUa-4xOHbz9fbqQ

This is a very small 50mm refractor telescope. The same aperture as a pair of 10x50mm binoculars, which would have been better for viewing sky objects. The maximum possible magnification is about 100 power (50 times aperture of 2 inches).

The field of view is very small you must be pointed directly at the sky object to see it. This is why we recommend a pair of binoculars as your first telescope. Binoculars have a wider field of view which makes finding things easier for the beginner.

Read my TIPS on my profile page, and read this:
http://www.texasastro.org/telescope.php

Jun 11, 2010 | Tasco Specialty 56TN (200 x 50mm)...

1 Answer

Blurres LCD image and blurred photos


1 suspect dirt on the lens ensue the lens is cleaned with proper cloth and fluid.
2 suspect auto focus sensor is defective or blocked ensure the little windows on the front are clear and fingers do not cover them while taking pictures.

3 suspect camera is set in macro setting, Macro only has a depth of field of a few centimeters any subject outside this field will be out of focus but his may not be visible on the small viewing screen on the camera but becomes apparent when images are viewed at larger sizes.
change camera setting to landscape or portrait setting.

Nov 13, 2009 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-T1 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have a Bushnell scope that a developed a small "flake" in the field of view. It is slowly pulled out of the field of view as the power is increased and is all the way gone on 9x but visible on 3-8x. What...


for this you will need to send the unit into their repair at 8500 marshall drive lenexa ks 66214 4-6 week turnaround and put your name address and telephone number inside the package. if there is a cost they will send an estimate.

Aug 25, 2009 | Bushnell Optics

1 Answer

Bushnell 114mm reflector telescope, can't see a thing


Probably NOT actually pointed directly at the moon-- you should have moved it around a little -- the moon was probably just outside the field of view through the eyepiece. ........................ telescope must be pointed DIRECTLY at the sky object-- also use the eyepiece with the largest number written on it=== this gives the LOWEST magnification..... and a slightly wider field of view.

Mar 07, 2009 | Fieldvision 114mm Reflector (114 x 114mm)...

2 Answers

LX200 EMC MEADE 8 INCH


By doing this trick--

Do a FAKE alignment-- (I assume that the scope is trained and has the proper date, time, and site)-- just push the buttons for the alignment stars that you cannot see. Then do a GOTO to a star that is in your field of view--- center the star and SYNC. Your gotos will now be OK in your limited field of view.

Jan 30, 2008 | Meade LX200R 8 in. (600 x 203mm) Telescope

1 Answer

Lesser viewing area in my telescope


All telescopes have small fields of view-- even what is called a "rich field scope" has only about 2 degrees of view. Most scopes only have about 1 degree of view.

The key component is a short tube and a fast mirror of F4.5 or faster.

Dec 18, 2007 | Optics

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