Question about Fender American Standard Jazz Bass® Electric Bass Guitar

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From the jack plug, what is the black wire attached to in the body of the guitar

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That is LIKELY a ground wire. Often it will attach by some means to conductive paint in the cavity of the guitar to act as shielding to reduce hum. Sometimes it is soldered to the back of a pot.

Search this site for a configuration matching your guitar for schematic.

http://www.guitarelectronics.com/c=WdFPr9QORFrwx9ORFVwTPM96v/category/wiring_resources_guitar_wiring_diagrams/

Posted on Oct 09, 2010

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My pedal had its phone jack end severed off. I'm trying to replace the jack. The units internal pot has 3 wire connection but the jack only has 2. What wires go where on the jack.


The jack uses three wires because it supports TRS (Tip-Ring-Sleeve) type ¼" jacks as well as standard TS (guitar) jacks.

To best see which wires go to which posts, it's easiest to find a TRS type jack and unscrew the cover to see the configuration.

If you can't find one, keep this general principle in mind:
Typically, the ground wire is black and is soldered to the main body of the connector, and the remaining wires are soldered together as one to the other post.

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How do I replace cord jack on a Peavey bass guitar?


You'll need needle nose pliers, small phillips head screwdriver, soldering iron, electronics-grade solder, socket screwdriver or 1/4" wrench, black electrical tape. Purchase necessary replacement jack. Remove plastic electronics cover plate, located on the back of the body, behind control knobs. This will expose the electronics cavity. Locate existing jack and its wire connections inside the exposed cavity. Remove any electrical tape covering the jack connections. Using a hot soldering iron, touch each of the two soldered input jack connections, one at a time, just until the soldered connection melts. Then, disconnect the associated wires (taking note of which wire connects where!). Once disconnected, loosen and remove the nut on the outer part of the jack that holds it onto the guitar body. Remove the old jack. Insert the new jack (with the nut removed) into the existing hole, from inside the electronics cavity and tighten it in place, on the outside of the guitar body, with the nut. Re-attach the wires to the new jack, by using needle nose pliers to wrap them tightly around the correct posts. Touch the hot soldering iron to each post and apply a small amount of solder to the post as it's being heated. Once the molten solder runs over the connection and looks shiny, remove the tip of the soldering gun. This process takes only 2 to 3 seconds. Let the connections cool for a few seconds. To insulate, wrap connections with black electrical tape. Replace cover plate.

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1 Answer

Ground wire is not attached


okay. the ground needs to travel through all your components.you have the -input jack, - vol. & tone pots, the -switch & all - pick ups. All should meet at the body ground. Usually there is a wire that comes from the saddle, through the guitar, and enters somewhere in the access in back. (remove the plate that cover your vol. and tone pots). Good Luck

Dec 04, 2011 | Dean Evo Xm Electric Guitar Natural...

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My double pick up Dean edge quit working while playing. I checked the wiring and all looks good, but three is s a black wire coming from hole to center of body attached to nothing. Looks like it never was....


Make sure you have two wires soldered to the output jack on the bass. having a wire lose is not purposely put like that, for no sound from the bass then that wire is either from the pickups and connects to the pots on the bass or on the output jack. I would suggest taking it to an authorized dean dealer to inspect the wiring.

Jul 13, 2011 | Dean Edge 4 Bass Guitar

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My Epiphone Dot just started humming really loudly when I plug it in - it stops humming when I touch the input jack. I assume it's a grounding issue on the input jack, but how do I get at...


Make you a hook out of a coat hanger. Get inside and hook the wiring to the jack, take the nut off the jack and pull it up through the F hole. You can plug in to it a patch cord so you can pull it back through once fixed. Check out Guitarelectronics.com for a wiring diagram.

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I get a lot of scratchy electric interferance noise when I play my guitar, but it hasn't always been this way...just started


Unless something has suddenly happened to your guitar (like being dropped) start by eliminating as many external factors as possible.
  1. If you are using an effects pedal plug straight into your amp to see if that cures it.
  2. Turn off any other electrical equipment in the vicinity that could be causing interference.
  3. Try changing your guitar lead - it may be just poor screening or cracked insulation in the cable.
  4. Try switching back and forth between the different pick-ups and also fully rotate all the volume and tone control knobs quickly several times - the contacts may have got dirty over time.
  5. Pull the jack plug in and out several times to make sure it isn't dirty contacts in there too - if it is give it a little squirt of 'switch cleaner' spray - available from most electronics suppliers or online via Amazon E-Bay etc.
  6. Check the screw bezel (threaded ring-nut) that holds the jack socket in the body of the guitar. Sometimes these work loose over time and then the jack plug doesn't quite go in far enough resulting in poor electrical contacts.
  7. If your guitar has active circuitry pick-ups also replace the battery - use high quality batteries (Duracell Ultra or similar) never re-chargeables as they don't hold high enough voltages.
  8. Try a different guitar to see if the problem is in the amp. Stand or sit in a different position, move about, turn round 90 degrees to see if it is just interference between the guitars pick-ups and the power supply in your amp.
  9. If none of the above works then it is likely to be a problem with the guitar's electrics - don't tamper if it is still in warranty. Carefully remove the back plate to see if any wires have come loose - it might be a dry solder joint on the jack socket or one of the control knobs so may not be immediately obvious. If the screen wire (sleeve of the jack plug) has come off it may not stop the guitar working but it may cause the noise problem.
  10. Beyond that I can only suggest taking it to a qualified guitar technician who can fully check the electrics with a test meter.

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2 Answers

Output jack


Have you tried another cable between amp and guitar? Usually the cable goes bad first. Have you tried another amp or possibly tried another guitar on your rig? If this still indicates that your guitar's Standard 1/4" TS Jack is noisy, remove the oval cover over the jack and check the solder joints for the wiring. Follow the wires back to the tone and volume pots and check those solder joints. If everything is secure...Plug in, power up and check for noise while turning the volume pots stop to stop. If the pots make a scratching noise, shut down rig and unplug the guitar. Get a can of spray contact cleaner with a small extension tube (available at electronic shops) to spray in the pots while turning them. (May have to remove pots fom the guitar to get at small openings on side of pot can.) Spray jack and test for noise. Jack STILL
noisy...If you can solder...unwire old jack, remove from guitar, take to electronic shop, match to Standard 1/4" TS Jack, install in guitar, resolder wire connections and test. If you cannot solder...take guitar to
a reputable shop or dealer that does this repair. Good Luck! P.S. The
spray contact cleaner can be used on the amp jack, pots and switches
too...just make sure the amp is unplugged from the power supply before
doing any spraying.

Jul 14, 2010 | B.C. Rich Nt Warlock Electric Guitar

1 Answer

I need to repair internal wires


Typically you have to unstring the guitar to get access to the insides.

Use a small miirror to view the insides. You may need to drag the jack out of the sound hole to resolder wires if they are broken. There should be three wires on the jack. One carries the audio, one the ground, and the third connects the battery when the instrument cable is plugged in.

After re-soldering the connections if needed, procure a piece of 1/4 inch wood dowel from your hardware store. Push the dowel through the hole where the jack goes and near the sound hole. Push the jack onto the dowel and then pull it back through the jack hole and pass the nut over the dowel and onto the jack threads and tighten. The extract the dowel rod from the jack.

It is near impossible to reach clear into the guitar body to put the jack back in without the dowel rod unless you have very tiny arms.

Feb 09, 2010 | CF Martin Music

1 Answer

Plug-in jack fell inside body


Try to see if you can fish one of the wires attached to the jack out enough to get the jack through the F hole. If you can get to the jack, get some medical tubing ( like they use in sling shots for example ) that will fit inside a jack. Stick the medical tubing through the guitar starting at the outside of the hole the jack is supposed to be in. Once you can fish the end of the tubing out through the Fhole, insert it into the jack and gently and carefully manuever the jack back into position by pulling on the other end of the tubing. You should be able to slide the washer and then the nut down over the tubing until you can thread them back into -place. Hope this helps.

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Getting Static noise when plugged in to amp


This is a very common problem that I have repaired for many friends. Sometimes the guitar jack becomes loose and gets rotated to the point where the wire breaks and/or touches the cord plug when it's inserted into the jack. You need to remove the access plate/panel at the back of the guitar body and see if the wire is broke or twisted. You may only have to loosen the jack retaining nut and rotate the jack to get the twist out or you may have to remove the jack and resolder the wire back in place. If its broke make sure to solder back on the proper terminal--the one with solder already on it and not the one that the cord plug touches when its inserted. Retighten the jack nut by firmly holding the jack from access side so it doesn't rotate again and cause that undesirable STATIC sound. Hope this helps.

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