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No signs of electrical power. The vertical orange light is off. 12 Volt power supply is OK, I checked its output voltage. What else can be done?

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Open the unit if not under warrenty look for a small clear 2.5 amp fuse it may need replacement you will have to look close as they dont like you find such things.

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Samsung plasma hp-r4272c, i dont have VS volt output on main power supply board


Just replace the main power supply board if there is no vs voltage output.

Sep 21, 2015 | Samsung HP-R4272 42 in. Plasma HDTV

1 Answer

Fault finding


Power is going to the motherboard, and you know this by assuming?

An assumption would be you see the Power Supply fan spin, LED lights light up, and maybe computer case fans spin.

Not an assumption, and you would have tested the 3 main voltage power rails, coming out of the Power Supply.

The Power Supply in your computer is an SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply. (Also is known as the short abbreviation - PSU. Power Supply Unit)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

The Power Supply in your computer is a Converter.
It converts HIGH AC voltage into 3 LOW DC voltages.

[Depending on country,
USA = 120 Volts AC. UK = 240 Volts AC. Japan is 100 Volts AC, but may depend on area. Australia = 240 Volts AC. India = 240 Volts AC. HOWEVER, do not write the above in stone. I may have made an error ]

The 3 low main DC Voltages coming out of the Power Supply is;
A) 3.3 Volts DC
B) 5 Volts DC
C) 12 Volts DC

Orange wires carry 3.3 Volts DC
Red wires carry 5 Volts DC
Yellow wires carry 12 Volts DC
ALL Black wires are Ground wires. They can also be called Negative wires.
This is a DC circuit now. There is a Positive, and a Negative.
Orange, Red, and Yellow wires are power wires, and also Positive wires.

The first part of your diagnosis will be to test those 3 main voltage power rails.

[Digressing;
Using an example;
There are many Red wires coming out of the Power Supply.
These are 5 Volt wires. They are Connected TO, the 5 Volt power rail in the Power Supply.
ALL 5 Volt wires end in one place, in the Power Supply.
The 5 Volt power rail.
When you test just ONE red wire, you are testing the entire 5 Volt power rail coming from the Power Supply.

This also goes for the Orange wires, and Yellow wires ]

With the Red 5 Volt wires, and Yellow 12 Volt wires, you could just use a 4-pin Peripheral power cable to check them,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Multimeter set to DC Voltage, the red (Positive) probe lead of the multimeter; touches the female metal terminal connector, for the Red wire.

http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/28-9420&utm_medium=Affiliate&ref=cj&utm_campaign=CommissionJunction&utm_source=CommissionJunction?t=2&utm_expid=8634549-14

The black (Negative) probe lead of the multimeter, touches a female metal terminal connector, that goes to a Black wire.

You should be reading 5 Volts DC.

Same thing for the Yellow 12 Volt wire.

With an Orange 3.3 Volt wire, this changes.
A straightened out paperclip is inserted, down into the BACK of the ATX main power cable's connector; AND into a socket hole with an Orange wire in it.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

The straightened out paperclip, slides down into the socket hole, with the Orange wire in it.
Slides down into the socket hole, RIGHT NEXT TO the orange insulation of the wire, and MUST go down far enough; to Touch that female metal terminal connector.

EVERY wire going down into the ATX main power cable's connector, ends in a female metal terminal connector.

Same thing is down with a socket hole that has a Black wire in it.
ALL Black wires are Ground wires. (Negative)
You can choose ANY socket hole that has a Black wire in it.

Now touch the two probe leads of the multimeter, to their respective straightened out paperclips.

Red (Positive) probe lead of multimeter, to straightened out paperclip in Orange wire socket hole.
Black (Negative) probe lead of multimeter, to straightened out paperclip in Back wire socket hole.

You should be reading 3.3 Volts DC.

(Or if your multimeter kit has special probe lead, that would take the place of a straightened out paperclip, of course use it instead)

Know this;
A) If ALL of the LED's ('lights') were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

B) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

C) A typical CPU (Processor) can use 51 to 130 Watts of power.
Just depends on what Processor (CPU) it is.

This is why a Power Supply with a weak voltage power rail, will not have enough power to turn the Processor ON, but will have enough power to light those simpy LED's, and spin fans.

[LED - Light Emitting Diode ]

Regards,
joecoolvette

May 11, 2013 | Dell Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Wht kind of current comes out?


The computer's switch mode power supply produces DC (direct current) electricity.

Nov 05, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I have a EMACHINE W5243 with a MCP61SM-GM Motherboard. When I press the power button the keyboard lites flash, fans come up to full speed than drop to a slower speed, than I get beeps about every...


Suggest Don, that you check the voltage power rails in the Power Supply, first. Make sure the Power Supply is working correctly.

Power Supply voltages check out, look VERY close at the motherboard.
(Power unplugged to computer, Anti-Static Precautions taken, motherboard OUT in hand )

Reasoning?

http://www.e4allupgraders.info/dir1/motherboards/socketam2/ecsMCP61SM-GM.shtml

eMachines are budget computers. Nothing wrong with that. Problem is the manufacturer saved the consumer on the cost, by using two low quality components.

A) The Power Supply
B) The motherboard

Both of these come up for the BIOS Beep Code you stated.

Power Supply's are usually Bestec, Delta, or HiPro.
These particular generic units use low quality Electrolytic Capacitors, MOSFET's, Rectifier Bridge, less than adequate gauge of wiring, and so on.

The motherboards, (MSI, ECS, TriGem, etc), use low quality Electrolytic Capacitors.
This is generally the item/s that go bad first. They are the 'weakest link'.

Yes, Electrolytic Capacitors are the weakest link in the Power Supply, also.

In the Power Supply they are used as Filters. They filter the incoming AC electricity, (Input Stage), and the outgoing DC electricity. (Output Stage)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

I really feel the problem is the Power Supply.
Why?
1) If ALL of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power. Just depends on what Processor it is. (Older Intel Pentium III's, II's, and so on, use less power than 51 Watts. Same with older AMD processors )

(The PSU { Power Supply Unit} in your personal computer is a SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply)

Click on the photo to the upper right, in the link above. The letter B is on the top of an Electrolytic Capacitor. You are looking at a Top View.
The blue ring is part of a plastic sleeve, which goes around the 'can' case of the capacitor.
These large capacitors are in the Input Stage.

The letter E is near a few more Electrolytic Capacitors. These capacitors are in the Output Stage.
These capacitors are Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors.
This is a side view of an example,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Capacitors_electrolytic.jpg

The top capacitor is an Axial Electrolytic Capacitor. The leads come out of each end. The bottom capacitor is a Radial Electrolytic Capacitor. Both leads come out of the same end. The capacitors in your Power Supply, and on your motherboard, are Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors.

Your Power Supply converts AC electricity form your home, or business, and turns it into low DC electricity.

A) The 3.3 Volt power rail
B) The 5 Volt power rail
C) The 12 Volt power rail.
(In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC )

In the power cables coming from the Power Supply.
1) Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
2) Red wires are 5 Volts
3) Yellow wires are 12 Volts
(All DC voltage)
Black wires are Ground wires.

Now, about the voltage power rail.
All 3.3 volt wires (Orange), end in one central 3.3 Volt point, in the Power Supply.
The central point is the 3.3 Volt power rail.

Same for the 5 Volt power rail. All 5 Volt wires (Red), end in one central 5 Volt point, in the Power Supply.
Same for the 12 Volt power rail.

This means, for example, if you test one Orange wire, and it shows 3.3 Volts on the multimeter, the 3.3 Volt power rail is good.
Test one Red wire in a power cable. Shows 5 Volts, or VERY near?
The 5 Volt power rail is good.
Same thing for the 12 Volt power rail.

One method to check the 5 Volt power rail, and the 12 Volt power rail.
Use a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable. (The connector on the cable is misnomered as a 'Molex' connector),

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Most of the time there is an unused Peripheral power cable.
You can use it's Red wire, Yellow wire, and Black wire, to test for 5 Volts, and 12 Volts.

Disregard the following if you are aware;
An economical multimeter can be purchased for around $5 to $12.
Available in a multitude of stores. An auto parts store is but one example.
Analog, or Digital, is fine.

The Red lead is the Positive lead. The metal tip is the probe. I refer to both as the Positive probe lead.
The Black lead is the Negative lead.

The Positive probe lead ALWAYS goes to the power wire to be tested.
3.3 Volt, or 5 Volt, or 12 Volt.
The Negative lead ALWAYS goes to Ground. (A-N-Y Black wire, is a Ground wire)

Computer sitting on a table, or workbench, computer case open, 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, untangled, and pulled to the outside where you can access it easily, the computer is plugged into power.

The center knob in the middle of the multimeter, is the Function Knob.
It is set to DC Voltage.
If there are only symbols, the symbol is a dotted line over a solid line.
(NOT a curved line over a solid line)

If there is more than one setting for DC Voltage, set it to the 0 to 50 Volt scale.

Turn the computer on. Holding the connector in your hand, of the 4-pin Peripheral power cable, insert the Positive probe lead's tip, into the socket hole with the Red wire.

Hold the probe lead, with the hand that is already holding the connector. With the other hand, insert the Negative probe lead's tip, into the socket hole with one of the two Black wires.

Watch the multimeter. You should be reading close to 5 Volts.
Test the 12 Volt wire using this method also. (Yellow wire, and Black wire. Black wire is Ground. Either one of them)

The 3.3 Volt power rail is tested using the Orange wire, in the 24-pin ATX main power cable.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

Power cable plugged into the motherboard, as in the photo to the right.
At the end of every wire, going into that long whitish connector with 24 socket holes, is a metal terminal.

The metal terminal is pretty far down in the socket hole. The probe lead must touch the metal terminal, but cannot due to it's size.
Use a straightened out paper clip.

The paper clip's diameter is small enough to slide into the socket hole, RIGHT NEXT TO the Orange wire, and touch the metal terminal.
Then the Positive probe lead is held against it. (Or with an alligator clip attachment, it is clipped on)

Do the same for A-N-Y of the Black wires. They are all Ground wires. Pick one. Insert a straightened out paper clip. The Negative probe lead touches it.
(Paper clips inserted, THEN computer turned on. It is only 3.3 Volts DC, but I want you to feel safe)

More in a Comment.

Dec 13, 2011 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

2 Answers

Pls help my computer shows no display


CPU fan runs, harddrive picks up, but no display.

1) Bad Power Supply
Or
2) Bad graphics chipset.

The two main factors for desktop computer failure, is a bad power supply, and/or the computer is dirty inside.

A) Bad Power Supply

Weak voltage power rail
Enough power to light LED lights, and perhaps spin fans, but not enough power to turn the Processor on.

IF all of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts

A typical Processor can use from 51 to 125 Watts.
Just depends on what Processor it is, as to what the maximum Wattage usage is.

CPU fan runs? Sure. It's only using 2 to 3 Watts.

Harddrive 'picks up'? You will hear the Spindle Motor spinning the Platters inside. Means nothing.

With no Processor running, BIOS can not hand the computer over to the Operating System. (WinXP is one example of an O/S)

There is nothing to find the Boot Record, on one of those Platters inside the harddrive.

(Explanation of physical construction of an average Harddrive,

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/hard-disk.htm )

You can check the Power Supply voltages out. See if there is a weak voltage power rail.

Power coming into the Power Supply is the dangerous voltage.
Power coming out of the Power Supply is not.

The Power Supply in your Personal Computer is an SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

Your Power Supply converts the electricity from your home, or business, into three main voltages,

A) 3.3 Volts
B) 5 Volts
C) 12 Volts

All are DC voltage. (The incoming electricity from your home or business, is AC voltage)
{In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC}

Use a multimeter to test the voltages. If you do not have access to one, an economical multimeter can be purchased for around $8 to $12. A multitude of stores carry them. An auto parts store is but one example.
Analog or digital, it doesn't matter. (I prefer Analog)

Set the Function Knob to DC voltage. (If just a symbol is used it is a dotted line over a solid line)

If there is more than one setting for DC Voltage, set it to the 0 to 50 Volts scale. (0-50)

The red probe lead is the Positive lead.
The black probe lead is the Negative lead.

The Positive probe lead touches the power wire
The Negative probe lead touches a Ground wire.

The 3.3 Volt power rail, the 5 Volt power rail, and the 12 Volt power rail, are the power wires.
Test one at a time.

ALL Black wires are GROUND wires.

Test at the ATX main power cable's connector.
The ATX main power cable is plugged into the motherboard. The Power Supply is plugged into power.

The ATX main power cable used for a Gigabyte GA-K8VM800M motherboard,
is a 20-pin ATX main power cable. This is an example of a 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Note the photo to the far right. The ATX main power cable is plugged into the motherboard.
Testing the voltages is done at the Back of the connector. Back of the ATX main power cable connector. The Back of the connector is where the wires go in.

The probe leads tips, will not fit down into the socket holes, next to the wires already present.
Suggest use an adapter. Suggested adapter is a paper clip.

The paper clip is straightened out, then inserted down into the socket hole, RIGHT NEXT TO THE WIRE that is already there.
The paper clip Must go down into the socket hole, to touch a metal terminal.

At the end of every wire going into the ATX main power cable connector, is a metal terminal. You have to go down past the insulation of the wire, and touch the metal terminal with the paper clip.

A) The Orange insulated wires are 3.3 Volts
B) The Red wires are 5 Volts
C) The Yellow wires are 12 Volts.

Example to test a 3.3 Volt power rail;

Power Supply unplugged from power insert a straightened out paper clip into a socket hole with an Orange wire. Leave it sticking up.

Now insert a straightened out paper clip, into ANY socket hole with a Black wire. (Ground)

Plug the Power Supply into power. Touch the red Positive probe lead of the multimeter, to the paper clip for the Orange wire. Hold it there.
Now touch the black Negative probe lead to the paper clip for the Ground wire.
(Black wire)

You should read VERY close to 3.3 Volts.

Same procedure for the 5 Volt power rail, and the 12 Volt power rail.

{Power Rail;
All 3.3 Volt (Orange wires), end at one central point in the Power Supply.
This central point is the 3.3 Volt power rail.
Same for the 5 Volt, and 12 Volt wires.

You can test any wire of that voltage, and be testing the entire power rail, for that voltage }

Power Supply checks out?
Graphics chipset.

Chp and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_Circuit

The graphics chipset is a GPU.
Graphics Processing Unit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPU

A GPU can be soldered directly to the motherboard, or to a removable card.

Soldered directly to the motherboard is Integrated Graphics.
Also known as OnBoard graphics. (ON the motherBOARD)

Soldered to a removable card is a Graphics Card.
(Full name is Graphics Adapter Card)

If you are using Integrated Graphics, try using a graphics card.
If the graphics card works, the problem is bad Integrated Graphics on the motherboard.
The graphics card bypasses using Integrated Graphics.

{The above is that you are seeing No Signal on the monitor.
If not check the monitor, AND the monitor cable to see if they are good. Test on a known to be good, working computer }

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Nov 05, 2011 | Gigabyte GA-K8VM800M Motherboard

1 Answer

I have a dell computer. when i turn on the tower and monitor i get just a black screen on the monitor. i have pushed a few buttons on the bottom of the screen and it just says power save mode please use...


No, it's the Power Supply.

Power Supply has a weak voltage power rail.

The monitor goes to Power Saver mode because it is not receiving a video signal. (No Signal)
This is because the computer is not working.


Dell Support > Dimension 4700 desktop computer > Service Manual,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim4700/sm/index.htm

Click on the heading - Advanced Troubleshooting

Is the Power On LED light blinking Amber? (Yellow)

Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

{You can also test the power coming out of the Power Supply.

The Power Supply in your computer is an SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

It converts the AC electricity from your home, or business, into DC electricity.
There are three main voltages produced;

A) 3.3 Volts (3 point 3)
B) 5 Volts
C) 12 Volts
All are DC voltage

Two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC.
(In case you are worried about being shocked.
The 'bad' electricity is contained inside the Power Supply's case)

If you do not have a multimeter, an economical unit can be purchased for around $8 to $12. A LOT of stores carry them. An auto parts store is one example.

Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
Red wires are 5 Volts
Yellow wires are 12 Volts.

ALL 3.3 Volt wires end at the same 3.3 Volt power rail in the Power Supply.
Same with 5 Volt wires, and 12 Volt wires.

You can test ANY Orange wire, or any Red wire, or any Yellow wire.

ANY Black wire you see is a Ground wire.

The red probe lead of the multimeter is the Positive lead. The black probe lead is the Negative lead.

The Positive probe lead is touched to a positive wire.
Orange, Red, or Yellow.

The Negative probe lead is touched to ANY black wire. ALL black wires are a Ground wire.

The function knob on the multimeter is set to DC voltage. (Dotted line over a solid line, with a dotted line under the solid line. The curved S line over a solid line is for AC voltage. This = No)

If there are different scale settings, set the function knob to 0-50 Volts. (DC)

Aug 24, 2011 | Dell Dimension 4700 PC Desktop

2 Answers

Pcv- rx860 desktop will not boot when power button is pressed, blue light blinking - could it be the power supply? tried re seating hard drive, memory and video cd


I also concur that the power supply is at fault.
Weak voltage power rail.

1) You can check the voltages of the power supply with a power supply tester, (One example: http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=5250576&CatId=1107

2) You can also check the voltages with a multimeter.

There are three main voltages produced by a SMPS.
(Switched Mode Power Supply. However the 3.3 Volt power rail is being phased out)

A) Wires with Orange insulation are 3.3 Volts
B) Red insulation 5 Volts
C) Yellow insulation 12 Volts

D) Black insulation denotes a Ground wire. ANY Black wire is a Ground wire. Granted not a power wire, but needed to be stated here with the power wires.

All power cables unplugged inside the computer, power supply still attached to computer case. Power supply is turned on, and the voltages are checked.

Multimeter is set to DC, and the 0-50 Volt scale if applicable.
The Positive (Red) probe lead of the multimeter is connected to a power wire.
The Negative probe lead is connected to ANY Ground wire.

The Voltage power wire of most concern here is the 12 Volt wire.
11 to 13 Volts is okay. Less than 11 volts it's time for a new power supply.

Apr 03, 2010 | Sony VAIO Digital Studio PCV-RX860 PC...

1 Answer

Adding trailerbrakes to a 24 volt truck


Are your electric brakes rated for 12 volt or 24 volt, that is the question. YOu have to supply the voltage at whatever the brakes are rated for.

Apr 15, 2009 | IBM LENOVO 24V POWER SUPPLY 42L0085 Power...

1 Answer

Output voltage


Hello rcgibson, output of charger for (if this is correct 'Roadmate 800 GPS unit) AC wall power supply or 12/24 volt DC is 5 volt at 455 milliamp.

Oct 24, 2008 | Magellan Universal Ac Wall Power Supply...

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