Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ5 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Got our Lumix DMC-FZ5 in 2006, and every picture we have ever taken inside is blurred, no matter what we do with shutter speed, aperature setting and flash. Also tried using the Party scene, as well as the Simple mode. Outdoor shots (in good light) are great.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Brigadier General:

    An expert that has over 10,000 points.

  • Master
  • 11,967 Answers

Are you pressing the shutter button half-way and allowing the camera to lock in the focus (it will beep) before pressing the rest of the way? Have you tried setting the camera on a firm surface or a tripod and fired off a few shots to see if they are better?

Posted on Oct 07, 2010

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How do you change the shutter speed on a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera? I want to take pictures of lightning with it, I have found the ISO settings find and changed them to what I want, but the...


Hello,
You may change your shutter speed in Manual mode only. So you should turn your mode dial button to M position. Then you may control both shutter speed and aparture value.

Jun 03, 2010 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Taking pictures with x3 telephoto lens


may be there is some problem with your shutter speed and lens

Jun 18, 2008 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ50K Digital Camera

1 Answer

Settings for indoor jr high boys basketball lumix dmc-f27


You're probably going to get blurry photos in such a dim environment no matter what you do. There are several things you can do to minimize the blur, however.

First, if you're sitting in the bleachers, forget about using your flash. You're too far away from the action for it to make any difference.

Raise the ISO as high as you can. It will add noise to the pics, but a noisy pic is probably better than a blurry pic.

Set the camera to aperture priority, then open up the lens as far as it will go (smallest f/number). This will force the camera to use the fastest shutter speed possible.

Use the fastest lens you have (of an appropriate focal length). One of the things that separate professional sports photographers from the rest of us is the speed of their glass. They have $2000 lenses for this purpose, while we probably spend less than that on our whole kit.

Feb 09, 2010 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Setting shutter speeds


Lumix DMC-fz18 Manual/Instruction book

http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPERMANPDF/DMCFZ18.PDF

Aug 23, 2009 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T700 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blur on fast moving objects


Try lowering the quality of the pictures. It will allow a faster shutter speed since it doesn't need as much data to make the picture. Try throwing a ball into the air and playing with the settings until you can get what you need.

Jan 21, 2009 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ18K Digital Camera

2 Answers

Cannot take indoor photos without flash


Hello,

Just as "Wrestling" explained, your camera is operating properly. There simply isn't enough light in the scene that you are trying to photograph. If you're new to photography, it's sometimes hard to remember that the human brain/eye combination is an incredible thing, and no camera can compete with a human being.

What I mean is, there is enough light in your room for your eyes to see detail, but not enough for your camera to 'see' the detail without additional light from your flash. However, there are a couple things you can try.

1. Raise the ISO setting on your camera (check your manual, it's easy). Turn the camera on, press and hold the ISO button (left top of camera) and rotate the main command dial (back of camera, upper left corner). Rotate left or right to lover or raise the ISO number. Watch in the top information panel as the ISO numbers change. Higher ISO numbers mean the camera is more sensative to light; you can take pictures when there is less light available. HOWEVER, there is a trade-off. The higher your ISO number, the more noise/grain your image will have. I think the ISO of the D200 is acceptable for enlargements (8x10's) up to about ISO 640 or 800. I'm very picky, you might find higher ISO settings work fine for your needs, especially if you are not making larger prints. Experiment! remember to change your ISO back to a lower setting when you're done with your low light pictures.

2. Take your camera off the fully automatic "P" mode (where the camera makes all the decisions), and change your shutter speed to a slower speed. The slower shutter speed lets more light into the camera, because the 'eye' (the shutter) is open longer. (Use the "S" mode where you set the shutter speed and the camera selects an appropriate aperature). HOWEVER, there is a trade-off again. The slower your shutter speed the more likely you are to have blurred pictures; your subject will move or your camera will shake. If you're taking pictures of a stationary object or an adult, you can tell the person to sit very still and experiment! As for reducing camera shake, first and foremost, learn to hold the camera properly. I can't stress this enough...it's the biggest reason for blurred photos that I see. learn/practice squeezing the shutter realease, not stabbing it. Then, invest in a lens with the Vibration Reduction feature.


3. Take your camera off of the fully automatic "P" mode and change your aperature. (If you like, you can use the "A" mode where you set the aperature and the camera selects the shutter speed for you). The aperature is how wide open the shutter "eye" opens with each picture. Think of your own eye. In bright sunlight, your pupils close down to small openings, as there is a lot of light available. If you are in a dark room, your pupils open as wide as possible to let as much light into your eye as possible. That's the same way a camera works. So, if you are in a darker room, you need to let more light into the camera...that means a larger aperature. The tricky part to remember is that the LARGEST aperature has the smallest number. That means a 3.5 aperature is a larger opening than an aperature of 16. HOWEVER, once again there is a trade-off, as a larger aperature means you have a smaller depth-of-field; depth of field means the area of your picture that is in focus. I'm sure you've seen landscape photos, where every detail is in sharp focus, the far away mountains and clouds, as well as small rocks and grass or a steam in the forground. That is created by a small aperature with a wide/deep depth of field. Then think of a portrait in a magazine or taken by a studio, where the person is in focus, but the background fades off into a pleasing blur. That's done with a large aperature and a narrow/shallow depth of field.

NOTE: The widest aperature available is determined by your lens, so you can't use all the aperature settings with every lens. Your camera knows this and will only adjust to whatever your lens has available. That's why you might have different settings available with different lenses. Experiment!!

OK, sorry if that was long-winded, but the D-200 is a great camera, yours is operating properly, and I want you to enjoy using it!

Jan 01, 2009 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

3 Answers

Nikon NEWBIE


put simply the ISO number is how sensitive the film is to light, the higher the number the more sensitive the film. The ISO on the camera sets the exposure system to give the proper exposure for that film (the f/n80 usually sets the ISO automaticly). Also the higher the ISO the more grainy the picture, I would recommend using ISO 200 film for the pictures you describe. I would set the camera to the P setting it is a good all-around setting.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon F80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Slow sutter speed/Lag in taking a picture


Use full auto mode or take out of Aperature priority, you may be shooting with a very small aperature setting and not know it. Also shutter priority can be set to a slow shutter speed.

Sep 24, 2008 | Fuji FinePix S5000 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Photo's blur alot


Blurness doesn't happens because of the number of the pixels in the cameras.
Is the picture on the computer screen blur/the cameras screen or the lens hole?

I suggest you to set the camera on Automatic station (red camera on the wheel) in day light,try to stay still see how blur the photos are when you are not playing with the parameters. it it's still blurry it could be the pulley block next to the -eyepiece. roll it until it's not blur.

goodluck

Jun 26, 2008 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ5 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Lumix pictures blurry


you might have accidently slowed your shutter speed in the settings

Oct 27, 2007 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ3 Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ5 Digital Camera Logo

69 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Panasonic Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

73665 Answers

Computer Links

Level 3 Expert

2385 Answers

Are you a Panasonic Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...