Question about Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

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You answer to my resent problem on night shots...

Aperture priority? im still new with the whole photography thing.  focusing issue is great, im not sure what to do with that, its not so much the lighting i mean my stock flash wasnt terrable but it wasnt great.  because of that my shots wernt that clear and focused.  when i had the flash on i could only use shutter speed 90 when normaly for action shots iv been using 2000.  i deffinetly know i need a speedlight but even the fact with the shutter speed i dont know how to fix that if you could help me with those problems id be happy but thanks for everything else.

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Hey matty reps,
Aperture priority is a setting on most SLR cameras where you choose the aperture, which is the size of the opening in the lens that lets light thru, and the camera chooses a shutter speed that provides a correct exposure. The smaller the opening in the lens the less light that gets thru to expose the film so the shutter has to stay open longer to provide a correct exposure, but the smaller the aperture you use the larger the depth of field. Depth of field is how far in front and behind the subject things are in sharp focus. Canon refers to aperture priority as Av mode. With flash photography the camera usually sets the shutter speed to a designated speed called xsync speed, which is probably 1/90th of a second since this is what you said the camera was setting it to, but that speed is irrelevant since the duration of the flash is what determines the exposure time with flash photography which is usually around 1/10000 of a second (easily fast enough to stop almost any action). In aperture priority with a flash the smaller the aperture you use the more that will be in focus but more light will be needed from the flash and the closer you will need to be to your subject. A hotshoe mounted flash will help tremendously. I hope I didn't confuse you more, but as I said before you are attempting something difficult to do in photography. Keep trying and you'll get it!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

Posted on May 29, 2008

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I'm doing a project for school and i need to change the aperture for different photos. But my camera refuses to take the photo on any other aperture. Why is there an aperture adjuster if you can't use it....


It depends on the lens.

If you're using a lens with an aperture ring, simply set the exposure mode to Manual or Aperture priority and change the aperture by turning the aperture ring on the lens. In Aperture priority the camera will set the shutter speed appropriately, in Manual you have to determine the appropriate shutter speed. If you want to use such a lens in Shutter priority or one of the Program modes, you must set the aperture to its smallest setting (largest f/number) and lock it.

If you're using a lens without an aperture ring then it's a bit harder. You can only use the camera in Shutter priority or one of the Program modes. You turn the command dial on the camera to change the exposure, and the aperture will change. If you want to use an exposure different than what the meter suggests, you can adjust it by using either exposure compensation or changing the ISO setting (or both).

If you need a manual, you can download one from
http://butkus.org/chinon/nikon/nikon_n6006af/nikon_n6006af.htm

Mar 08, 2011 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I have a Canon Rebel XS with a 70-300 zoom lens. I am wanting to take pictures of soccer at night with lights. What are the best settings?


Your camera is equipped with a sports setting on the command dial see diagram
Diagram here
tri3mast_199.jpg
This setting will freeze fast moving subjects and if you keep your finger on the shutter it will shoot continuously. Knot knowing how bright the playing field is I'm going to suggest going with a good ISO 800 film. My preference is Fujifilm but I don't know where in the world you are and you may have access to an 800 speed film on another brand. You have a great lens for doing this so camera lens film and the sport setting should be all you need with the Rebel XS. Now one thing if the built in flash decides to pop up just close it down. What I use to do if the flash became annoying was I set a little black bag over it and carried a couple sets of batteries. I liked using this mode because it let me concentrate on the players, game and composition rather then fiddling with the camera controls, let it do it's thing you just need to capture the action. Watch for the shutter speed blinking which will indicate that the shutter speed has dropped into a 1/60 or less zone and camera shake my blur the picture. Another setting I used was AV which is aperture value still using the Fujifilm ISO 800 I would set the aperture on the lens at F5.6 my lens was an F4, if your lens is say an F3.5 you would use F4.5. In AV mode you will not have the flash pop up or the shutter speed warning. Focus is the big thing you can blur the whole picture put if the players eye are sharp and clear you just aced the shot. Motion blur shows movement but focus on the eyes open the frame up show some of the players environment and you will be the hero in the club house when the pictures come in. Another thing Don't cheap out on the processing get a good custom lab to process the film one that is going to correct the pictures not run 'em through on auto feed. Take lots of film and plan on using all of it. Cheers have fun at the game(s)

Jan 18, 2011 | Canon EOS Rebel XS 35mm SLR Camera

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Getting Error FEE when in manual mode


The error code means that you have mounted a lens with a manual aperture control and have failed to set the control to the minimum aperture setting (highest number). By setting the control to the minimum aperture, the camera can then automatically select any aperture between the maximum and minimum settings when taking the photo. The actual aperture selection is either set automatically by the camera body (if in shutter priority or auto/program modes) or is done using the camera body controls when in aperture priority or manual modes.

If you have done so and still have the problem then add a comment and we'll explore further possibilities which all involve a fault with either the lens or the camera body.

If I have resolved your problem then please take a moment to rate my answer.

Apr 19, 2010 | Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

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I dont understand the depth of feid button


Depth of field is one of the most useful creative controls on any camera.

It enables you to see how any given aperture setting will affect how much of your photographic scene will be in sharp focus. Aperture settings don't just affect how much light enters the lens, they determine how much of the scene in front of and behind the subject which you've focussed on will also be in focus. The distance between the nearest object in sharp focus and the most distant is called the depth of field.
Wide open apertures (i.e. lowest numbers) give you the shallowest depth of field and vice-versa.

Modern cameras always show the image in the viewfinder or LCD using the lens aperture wide open, regardless of what you've actually set: this allows maximum light into the lens to allow you to clearly see the scene and the lens only close down to the correct aperture at the moment that you press the shutter. The depth of field button (more correctly called the depth of field preview button) enables you to close down the aperture to what it's actually been set to so that you can see exactly what is in sharp focus; when you press it the scene will darken as there will be less light entering the camera, but if you look at a foreground or background subject which is out of focus before you press the button you'll notice that it becomes sharper when you activate the preview. The button will not have any effect at all if you have the lens set to it's maximum (lowest number) aperture, as the aperture that you're viewing the scene at is identical to the one you're taking the photo at.

Understanding depth of field and how you can manipulate it is vital to taking stunning photos:-

Say you want to take a photo of a bee on a flower: if you leave the camera set to auto, or select a medium to small aperture then the photo will show the bee, the flower, and everything in front and behind making a confusing and busy shot. If you select a wide open aperture then the bee will be in sharp focus (if you're really close, maybe only it's head), the flower, or parts of it will be in sharp focus, and the foreground and background will blur out making the bee and the flower the most important compositional elements in your shot.

Alternatively, you may be in a situation where you need to lift your camera quickly and take a shot without disturbing the subject. You don't know exactly how far away your subject will be, but you know it will be between, say, five feet and twenty feet. If you use your camera as normal, you'll see the shot, lift the camera to your eye, wait for focus (if using an autofocus camera, it might not even focus on what you intend). By the time the shutter has activated the moment has passed or the subject has seen or heard you and gone. Using depth of field you can manually prefocus to a point about a third of the way into your d.o.f. (in this case, ten feet) and select the correct aperture to give you a fifteen foot d.o.f. The setting varies with the lens, but you'll almost always get away with f8). When you see the right shot you just lift the camera and fire without worrying about focus and if you've done so correctly your subject will be sharply focussed. Of course, you could set the lens to minimum aperture, but this can result in the shutter speed being too low for the light conditions and causing unsharpness due to movement of the subject or your camera.

The technique is known as hyperfocal focussing and it explains why some lenses have various markings on them in various colours with aperture numbers next to them, they're a simple depth of field calculator for any given aperture setting. I'd provide a link but it's better if you search yourself as some sites go into what may be far too much detail about the subject.

Hope this has helped you, all that I ask in return is that you take a moment to rate my answer. If there's anything which you want me to clarify further then add a comment to my answer and I'll return as soon as I can to assist you some more.

Jan 30, 2010 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

New response to night shots


Hey matty reps,
The numbers you are seeing represent the size of the aperture. The smaller the number you set the camera to the larger the opening in the lens that lets light thru, and the larger the number is the smaller the opening is. The closer you are to your subject the smaller aperture you can use (larger#'s) because you will need less light from the flash to reach the sensor, and the farther away you are from your subject the larger the aperture (smaller#'s) you will need to use. I hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 29, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Night shots


Hey matty reps,
You are attempting one of the most challenging types of photography there is, because you are combing nighttime photography and action photography. If you want to stop the action you normally would be using the highest shutter speed possible, but since you are trying to take nighttime action photographs I would rely on a flash since the flash duration in essence becomes your shutter speed. I would definitely use a hotshoe mounted flash because the built in flash will most likely not be powerful enough for your needs. I would have the camera set to aperture priority so I could control the depth of field, because the smaller the aperture the larger depth of field you will have and the less likely your subject will be out of focus. If you are attempting natural light nighttime action photography you will definitely need a very fast film speed such as 3200 speed film which will provide significant loss of image quality. You will also need a very fast lens meaning a lens with an aperture of at least f2.8 or larger, and your camera in this scenario should be set to shutter priority so you can set the camera to the fastest shutter speed possible but this will present focusing issues. In both scenarios I would have the AF system set to continuous so the camera doesn't require you to achieve focus to be able to trip the shutter. As in all challenging photography situations more photos are better than less, because you should have more failed photos than successful. I hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 28, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

FEE MESSAGE


Yes, on this camera you leave the aperture ring at f22 and use the camera's controls to set your f-stop. It won't work is you change the ring on the lens. You gain the control of the aperture in the 'M' and 'A' modes. The 'P' setting is for the camera to pick both speed and aperture for you. 'S' is shutter priority, etc

Jan 25, 2008 | Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How and when to use the flash


When you take a shot slower than 1/20, the shutter takes longer to close. This means while it is open, it will record everything. The best way to correct this is not the flash really. Try putting it on a tripod. This way you can lower your shutter speed without sacrificing crisp pictures. Also, with a built in flash, you get a very shallow lit area. If your subject is far from the camera, the flash won't do much good. When this happens, the only thing to do is get a stronger mounted flash or slow your shutter down and open up your aperture. Hope this helps. Keep me posted. Photography is a never ending learning process.

Oct 15, 2007 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Aperture priority not working...HELP!!


Hey Mike, This is an easy one. With the battery grip attached, you can only have either Shutter Priority or Aperture Priority work properly. You can change it with the custom function settings of the camera. So you can change it to work with Aperture Priority if you use that more so then shutter priority won't work. Brandon

Oct 21, 2006 | Nikon F100 35mm SLR Camera

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