Question about Canon T70 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Shutter sticking open

When I take a picture the viewfinder stays black until I jiggle the camera. Then there is a click and the viewfinder is open again. I have replaced the batteries and the film. I think the lens I have is a bit loose. But when I take the lens off and check I notice that the mirror gets stuck, but that was after I had my finger in the way of the shutter.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Legend:

    An expert who has written 200 answers of more than 400 characters.

  • Expert
  • 480 Answers

Hey jimicricket,
The mirror is what reflects what the lens is seeing up to the viewfinder, and if it is sticking in the up position that is why you can't see anything sometimes thru the viewfinder. I would have the camera looked at by an authorized service technician, and it's possible that it just needs a good cleaning.

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

Posted on May 28, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

My nikon N6006 was difficult to load film but then seemed to work, all my settings appear to be correct as per the manual. i thought i took a couple pictures but the film counter still reads E. Now the...


When you say it was difficult to load film, how was it difficult?

One of the most common mistakes I see people make when they say it was difficult, is they unwittingly shove their finger right through the shutter curtain when trying to load a roll. Since the roll is likely no good at this point anyway, rewind it and open the camera.

Look at the center where you should see what looks like 4--5 horizontal little blades of foil. If these aren't nice and straight, but are crinkled, crumpled, aren't closed, half stuck open, the mirror is stuck open, or any number of other issues - you're toast.

Either consult a qualified repair tech locally if there is one or try somewhere like KEH Camera, you can find them online. If you don't want to repair it, stick it on ebay listing the damage and make $1-2

Jul 29, 2011 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Shutter won't open/blaack when you look through lens


Your shutter may be stuck open... this will give the appearance of the shutter not opening as well as no image when you look through the viewfinder.

Open the back of the camera, as if you were replacing the film, and look to see if the shutter is open. If it is, you can probably see light coming through the lens when looking from the back of the camera.

If this is the case, you will need to find out why the shutter is stuck open.

Some cameras use a battery to activate the shutter, some cameras have a "bulb" setting that keeps the shutter open for long exposures.

Whatever you do, do NOT force the shutter... I might jiggle it a little bit to see if it will close, but I wouldn't recommend more than a slight jiggle.

While you have camera open, inspect the mirror. If the shutter is closed but the mirror is stuck "up" (to allow light to reach the shutter/firm), there is a chance that you would not be able to activate the shutter.

Aug 31, 2010 | Pentax Program Plus 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

My shutter keeps sticking. I dont understand the


I would suggest you take the camera in to a qualifed service tech for a CLA (clean-lube-adjust). Like any mechanical device, a camera shutter could use periodic service.

Jun 25, 2010 | Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How to KNOW the light is right 4 an Olympus OM20 Manual camera?


OM-20 was basically a upgraded OM-10 with the manual adapter built in and a number of other refinements.

The viewfinder has LED's to show the shutter speed recommended by the camera's lightmeter for the ISO and aperture selected. It also has an exposure compensation indicator (the +/- symbol) and an indicator for flash ready which doubles up as a post-exposure flash confirmation. There is also the indicator lamp to show manual mode has been selected. OM-10 lacks the manual mode lamp and the +/- indicator.

Like the OM-10, the OM-20 is primarily an aperture priority automatic camera. In this mode you set the ISO film speed, choose which aperture you wish to use (with the ability to use the lens depth of field preview button) and then the camera selects the correct shutter speed. The +/- exposure compensation control allows the user to tell the camera to modify the recommended shutter speed by up to two stops either way.

In manual mode, there is no manual metering. The light meter behaves exactly as it does in aperture priority mode and the viewfinder shows the recommended shutter speed and not the manually selected one. Correct metering is therefore a case of adjusting the aperture first, and then choosing the correct shutter speed indicated in the viewfinder. If the user then decides to select a different shutter speed, then the aperture ring must be adjusted to maintain the correct exposure. For example the aperture is set to f8 and the camera recommends 1/60th of a second. The user decides that a faster shutter speed is required and chooses 1/250th, but the viewfinder remains showing 1/60th. In order to keep the same exposure value the user must open the aperture by two full stops to f4. The camera's light meter will detect the new aperture setting and providing the light on the object is unchanged the viewfinder shutter speed display should now show 1/250th as well to confirm the correct adjustment. Alternatively, the user can choose the shutter speed first by looking at what has been set on the control ring (or by turning the ring to the end of its travel and then counting the clicks from there as all experienced OM users do) and then turning the aperture ring until the shutter speed shown in the viewfinder matches what's been manually set.

It all sounds clumsy and complex but is done far more quickly than I've taken to type this and becomes second nature.

Aperture priority metering is selected on the camera by choosing AUTO on the mode selecter. In this mode the shutter speed ring has no effect and the viewfinder always displays the automatically selected shutter speed.

May 09, 2009 | Olympus OM-2000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Nikon FG 35mm


If its black when you look thru the viewfinder its likely because the mirror is stuck in the up position. It will often do that if the batteries are exhausted. Try replacing the batteries.

The mirror might release back down if you turn the shutter speed dial to M90. This is a manual release of 1/90 second for when you need the shot but don't have any power.

When you look in the lens opening and adjust the aperture dial, you are seeing the aperture open and close. Not the shutter. You need to open the back of the camera (without film) and take a photo to see the shutter curtains open and close.

You should have a read thru the manual to become familiar with the camera and its operation:

http://www.cameramanuals.org/nikon_pdf/nikon_fg.pdf

Jan 03, 2009 | Nikon FG 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Pentax ME Super Shutter and Rapid Wind Button...


anmolag,

it could be the rubber bumper next to the fresnel lens has become sticky. very gently ( after removing lens ) try to bring mirror down without forcing it. it should release easily.
if not, rotate the select knob off auto. open film door and check that the shutter is fully deployed, shutters should not be overlapping.
remove screws from bottom cover and remove cover, keep camera up side down so that re-wind button stays put. there is a locking lever under the take up spool ( gray ) . with a pin move lever toward film door and bring advance lever fully to the right , then let it go so it returns quickly.
the shutter should have fired. if not the camera will need to be repaired. get an estimate first as there are no new parts available.

Dec 24, 2008 | Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Nikon FG shutter


By "stayed up", do you mean that the mirror remained in the up position so that you could not see anything in the viewfinder or do you mean that the shutter actually remained open? I do not remember the exact features on your camera, but in general, this is what I would do.

1) Remove the film from the camera and take a picture. Note if you see anything in the viewfinder. If you see nothing, the mirror is in the up position. Verify this by removing the lens and opening the door on the camera back. Look through the lens hole. If you can see through the rectangular hole at the film plane, the shutter is open. If instead you something is obstructing the hole, the shutter is closed. In any case DO NOT TOUCH THE SHUTTER! The shutter is what is covering the hole.

2) If the mirror is in the up position, check to see if your camera has a feature that allows locking the mirror in the up position. Some cameras have this feature to allow use of lenses with very short focal lengths. If this is the case, simply unlock the mirror.

3) If the shutter is the problem, your shutter speed may be set to "T", which stands for time. In the time exposure mode, you press the shutter release once to open the shutter and a second time to close the shutter. Cameras with a "T" setting also have a "B" setting, which stands for bulb. This is a throwback to the old days when it was common to use air-powered shutter releases rather then cable releases. The bulb was a rubber bulb that you squeezed to force air through a tube and push a pin to activate the shutter. The "B" setting keeps the shutter open as long as you hold the shutter release in, but as soon as you take your finger off the shutter release, the shutter closes. Both of these settings are used to make timed exposures. If you find that the problem was that the shutter was set to "T", set the shutter speed to 1/25th second or so and try again. The following sequence should occur; the mirror will flip up and the viewfinder image will disappear, the shutter will open for the prescribed time and close, the mirror will return to the down position and you will again see through the viewfinder.

If this does not work, you may need to take it in for repair.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon FG 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I have two different lens one is stronger than the other.Sometimes I take the perfect picture then other times not so good.How do I know which lens to use for close up or i want a distant shot at a cl


Do you mean that, you press the shutter release once and the shutter stays open until you press the shutter release a second time. If so, check your shutter speed setting. If it is set to "T" (Timed Exposure) the camera is working correctly. Change your shutter speed to an appropriate setting, such as 1/125. If that does not solve the problem, you might need to take it in for repair.

Nov 10, 2008 | Nikon F65 35mm SLR Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Canon T70 35mm SLR Camera Logo

Related Topics:

177 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Canon 35mm SLR Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

96576 Answers

old marine
old marine

Level 3 Expert

1472 Answers

logcabiny

Level 1 Expert

24 Answers

Are you a Canon 35mm SLR Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...