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I can't download music from my computer to my InVion 256MB MP3/WMA/REC. Do I need something special? Computer says it recognizes new hardware but I have'nt been able to download music

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Are you getting a specific error message when you try to transfer songs? Does it look like they are transferrring, and then do not play? Are you just looking for the program that you would use to transfer songs? I would suggest Windows Media Player. Is iTunes your music service? If so, they will not work with this mp3 player.

You can also drag and drop the Mp3 or WMA files from Windows Explorer:
Try this - connect your mp3 player to computer --> double-click on My Computer --> double-click on the icon of the mps player --> double-click on the music folder --> drag and drop the music files to a folder/desktop of your own choosing

Check the format of the song - this player will play mp3 or wma, but if your wma's do not have "transfer rights" then you cannot transfer them to this or any other player.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Posted on May 28, 2008

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Computer Recognizes player but will no recognize music and all folders are empty


is the firmware up to date and what format is your music (mp3,vob,wav,wma,)?you might need an update for your software on your player and check to see what your player is able to play like mp3s, wma, wav,vob....

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hi,

Have you tried connecting to the net and then continue to subscribe??

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Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part II by Tha Mp3 Doctor WMA files are...


Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part II
by Tha Mp3 Doctor

WMA files are special. There are two types of WMA file, and the Mp3 or digital Audio Player documentation will not always tell which of these two types the Mp3 player will recognize. Type I is a non-licensed, or non-DRM-protected WMA file. DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is Microsoft’s copyright system for music files. If you have a type of Mp3 player that will only accept non-DRM protected files, the product specs for your player will NOT mention the words "DRM" or "Windows Plays ForSure" on them (unless they are using it in the negative, such as "this player does NOT support DRM encryption"). In MOST cases (there are more and more exceptions), Windows Media Player will convert songs from CD’s that you personally bought from the store into non-DRM encrypted WMA format.

The second type of WMA file is a DRM-encrypted WMA file, and there are several subtypes of these. Every DRM-encrypted file can have "play rights," "burn rights," and "transfer rights." "Play rights" mean you can play the song on your computer, "burn rights" mean you can burn the song to CD, and "transfer rights" mean you can transfer the song to your Mp3 player. Once again, not all WMA files are created equal. If you have a BASIC subscription to a music service such as Napster, you may download songs that have "play rights" – you can play them on your computer without any problem; but they may lack burn rights and transfer rights – so you cannot burn them to CD, or transfer them to your Mp3 player without incident. The solution here is to upgrade your music service to the premium, more expensive subscription that includes burn rights and transfer rights.

Then there are "fixed-term" licenses and "unlimited" licenses on WMA files. A fixed-term license will expire after so many days, months, or years; and will require you to resynchronize your songs to the music service or to your computer in order to continue playing them. This is a key reason behind songs "disappearing." Napster and Rhapsody are two examples of music services with fixed-term licenses. You must resynchronize your Mp3 player to your computer every 30 days, and you must keep you music service subscription active. If you let your subscription lapse, then the songs that were once working will no longer be playable. Once again, the only remedies are to renew your music service subscription (legal), convert those songs into a different format that the Mp3 player will recognize (possibly illegal), or to use DRM-removal software (illegal and unreliable).

One word needs to be said about burning your own personal CD’s and transferring them to the Mp3 player. CD’s naturally put song files into CDA format. Most Mp3 players do not recognize CDA format. So you will have to use Windows Media Player (easiest, IMO) or some other software to convert the CDA files into Mp3, WMA, or some other format that your Mp3 player recognizes, BEFORE you can transfer them to the Mp3 player.

Real Audio files also have an encryption system, and may not work with most Mp3 players – check your product documentation.

Audiobooks are in their own format and bring their own special problems which fall outside the scope of this article.

There are a ton of music services out there. iTunes uses AAC format. Napster, Rhapsody, Bearshare, Spiral Frog, and many others use DRM-protected WMA format nowadays. Limewire and Morpheus generally use Mp3 or non-DRM-encrypted files. Double check the formats that your player will support BEFORE choosing a music service. Conversely, if you already have a music service, choose an mp3 player that’s right for your particular service. Note: most store workers do not have the faintest idea of what I have been discussing in this article, so don’t trust their judgment – educate yourself first.

AS A GENERAL RULE OF THUMB (as always, there are exceptions), all Mp3 players recognize the Mp3 file format. The Mp3 file format is the least problematic of all the file formats. It takes up less space on your Mp3 player than most file formats – so you can load more songs onto your player than if you were using other formats. So, if you download all of your songs into Mp3 format, or tell Windows Media Player to convert your own CD’s into Mp3 format, then you will rarely go wrong.

on Jun 09, 2008 | iRiver H340 MP3 Player

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Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part I By Tha Mp3 Doctor I have seen...


Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part I
By Tha Mp3 Doctor
I have seen quite a few threads around Fixya in which the stated problem is that the Mp3 or Digital Audio Player will not load the songs; will appear to load the songs but will not actually play them in the Mp3 player once disconnected from computer; will skip the songs on the player, or show only “0:00” for file length; songs “disappear” all of a sudden (although this particular problem can be caused for many reasons not covered in this article); your store-bought/burned/ripped CD’s will not load into your Mp3 player; or get the error message “File Format Not Supported.” All of these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC, WAV, RA, etc. Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.
First things first. If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu. If you do not know how to do this, you will need to contact the manufacturer of your computer or go to www.microsoft.com. For all types of file except RA, RAX, and WMA, the “General” Tab under Properties will auto-populate. If your computer recognizes the file format, it will say something like “MPEG-3,” “Windows Media Audio” (Windows Media Player), “Real Audio” (Real Player or Real Network’s Audio), or “Advanced Audio Coding” (iTunes) or some other such designator. If your computer does not recognize the format, then you will just see a generic “Audio File,” and will have to download additional software. With WMA and some RAX files, there will also be a “License,” “Digital Rights Management,” or “Media Usage Rights” tab. I will explain these licensing tabs later, in the discussion on WMA files.
For every type of file other than WMA, the format error is pretty straightforward. You are trying to load a completely incompatible file format that is not recognized by the Mp3 player. To give you an example, there are currently no Philips GoGear Mp3 players that will load songs from the iTunes music service. The reason they will not transfer or play correctly is that the GoGear is that iTunes gives the users their songs in .AAC format. The GoGear cannot recognize .AAC format. To resolve this problem, you will have to convert the AAC song file into Mp3 format, or some other format that the GoGear recognizes (Note to the law-abiding: converting a copyright protected file into another format might be illegal. If you are concerned, I would just re-download the same song in Mp3 or another recognized file format – this will require a separate music service other than iTunes, in this example).
Please Read Part II for Critical Information...

on Jun 09, 2008 | iRiver H340 MP3 Player

1 Answer

Sansa e260 will not connect to computer


Unplug the Sansa from the computer. Turn it off. Hold in the REC button. Reconnect the Sansa to the computer while holding in the REC button. After 10-15 seconds of continuing to hold in the REC button, a window should pop up saying "Found New Hardware Wizard." Complete the Wizard.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Dec 27, 2008 | SanDisk Sansa e260 MP3 Player

1 Answer

Songs won't go on mp3 player.


Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part I
By Tha Mp3 Doctor
I have seen quite a few threads around Fixya in which the stated problem is that the Mp3 or Digital Audio Player will not load the songs; will appear to load the songs but will not actually play them in the Mp3 player once disconnected from computer; will skip the songs on the player, or show only “0:00” for file length; songs “disappear” all of a sudden (although this particular problem can be caused for many reasons not covered in this article); your store-bought/burned/ripped CD’s will not load into your Mp3 player; or get the error message “File Format Not Supported.” All of these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC, WAV, RA, etc. Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.
First things first. If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu. If you do not know how to do this, you will need to contact the manufacturer of your computer or go to www.microsoft.com. For all types of file except RA, RAX, and WMA, the “General” Tab under Properties will auto-populate. If your computer recognizes the file format, it will say something like “MPEG-3,” “Windows Media Audio” (Windows Media Player), “Real Audio” (Real Player or Real Network’s Audio), or “Advanced Audio Coding” (iTunes) or some other such designator. If your computer does not recognize the format, then you will just see a generic “Audio File,” and will have to download additional software. With WMA and some RAX files, there will also be a “License,” “Digital Rights Management,” or “Media Usage Rights” tab. I will explain these licensing tabs later, in the discussion on WMA files.
For every type of file other than WMA, the format error is pretty straightforward. You are trying to load a completely incompatible file format that is not recognized by the Mp3 player. To give you an example, there are currently no Philips GoGear Mp3 players that will load songs from the iTunes music service. The reason they will not transfer or play correctly is that the GoGear is that iTunes gives the users their songs in .AAC format. The GoGear cannot recognize .AAC format. To resolve this problem, you will have to convert the AAC song file into Mp3 format, or some other format that the GoGear recognizes (Note to the law-abiding: converting a copyright protected file into another format might be illegal. If you are concerned, I would just re-download the same song in Mp3 or another recognized file format – this will require a separate music service other than iTunes, in this example).
Please Read Part II for Critical Information...

Sep 20, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I have a sylvania mp3 player i wanna put music on it how do i do that have no instructions for it model number is smpk8854b if that helps


Usually when the player is connected to a PC, it will automatically recognize the unit as a generic external storage device (you should get a "hardware connected" message). If your computer does not automatically open a window that will allow you to have access to the units' internal memory, you can access it through "My Computer" (it should be recognized as a drive - e.g. E:, F:, etc.). After that, putting music on the mp3 player is a matter of copy and pasting the files from the computer's hard drive to the players' memory. Just make sure the music is in the mp3 or wma format before copying it.

Sep 15, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Disney mix max problem


Connect your player to the USB port on your computer using the USB connector on the Mix Max. A 'MIX-MAX' window will appear in your My Computer folder which is the player's internal memory. To add more files and songs to your player simply drag and drop MP3 or WMA files from anywhere on your computer into the 'MIX-MAX' window.

For Windows XP, you can utilize Windows Media Player 10 software to convert music on an audio CD into MP3 or WMA format as follows:

Open the Windows Media Player 10 Browser, then click on the 'Rip' icon on the top tool bar. Insert a Music CD into the CD-ROM drive of your computer.
Click on the 'Tools' menu option at the top menu bar, then click on 'Options'; the Option setting menu will appear. Click on Rip Music and set the Rip music to the desired location on the newly ripped music (MP3 format or Windows Media Audio format). Adjust the audio quality as desired. When finished, click 'OK' to confirm the settings.
Click on the 'Rip Music' icon to start ripping the music to your computer.
When the music tracks are ripped; connect the player to your computer. Open the 'MIX-MAX' window and open the ripped music location window.
To add the transferred/ripped music file/songs to your player simply drag and drop the MP3 and/or WMA files into the 'MIX-MAX' window.
When the files are finished loading into the player, follow the 'Safely Remove Hardware' procedure as shown below.
Note: For Windows 98SE, Windows ME, and Windows 2000, please use the Windows Media Player 9 to convert music on an audio CD into MP3 or WMA format.

Downloading WMA files with DRM using Windows Media Player 10 (for Windows XP)

To download WMA files with DRM, follow the procedure described below using the previously installed Windows Media Player 10. Before beginning the procedure please turn the unit on and connect the unit to the computer as previously described.

Open the 'Windows Media Player Browser 10' and click on 'Sync'.
Click on the 'Sync List' pull-down menu to locate the music files you wish to download. Then make sure to click the box next to the files.
Select the Portable Device that you want to copy to from the right side drop-down menu. Click 'Start Sync' to start downloading the WMA file(s) with DRM to the Portable Device.
After finished downloading all the desired files to your unit, follow the 'Safely Remove Hardware' procedure as shown below.
Note: For Windows 98SE, Windows ME, and Windows 2000, please use the Windows Media Player 9 to download WMA files with DRM to your player.

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buy one that actualy works

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1 Answer

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take the piece of shit back. i bought my mom one for christmas, the music file won't even open for ours. don't even bother with it, just take it back and find a better mp3 player. :]

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