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Voltage regulator or transformer for use in peru south america

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Power supply Model Nmb:PS600E20EE-EN. 5.OA /DC 15V. Toshiba Lap Top

Posted on Jun 22, 2008

  • voodoofiona Jun 22, 2008

    Lap Top is not working with out the power supply has not been used for a 1yr. please help. I need this as I am Disabled, and cant all ways sit @ the desk top

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Does a ATX power transformer makes the difference of watts of a power supply unit of a computer? Exactly I am planning to improve performance of my pc's ATX power supply unit. Trying to attach another...


NO NO NO... PC power supplies are switching supply's. The transformers use high voltage to drive other components. Increasing the power out of the supply will require you to upgrade the power supply to a higher wattage output.

Oct 23, 2013 | Microsoft System Power Supplies

1 Answer

How do i build a 12vac 2a adapter step by step.


Just get a transformer with a 12 volt 25 VoltAmp rating on the secondary and a primary suitable to your mains power in your part of the world. 120 VAC 60Hz for continental North America. for example.

Put a power cord on the primary with a suitable switch to shut it off, and the output of the transformer will provide you with the 12 Volts AC at 2 Amps output. Attatch the suitable adapter to the end of the secondary wires, and you are all set. AC does not have a polarity like DC.

Dec 22, 2011 | System Power Supplies

1 Answer

Schematic diagram example of AC DC regulated power supply 1.5volt to 35volt


You will need to add transformer and rectifier diodes before this circuit to be able to get the voltage you need.


See the link below of the regulated part of the circuit

http://simpleelectronic.com/2010/06/11/simple-adjustable-regulated-power-supply-circuit-diagram/

If you need more help let me know.

Sep 29, 2011 | System Power Supplies

3 Answers

I have a customer that recently replaced his generator, problem is , he got a 120 VAC output. He has 2 SW 4024 for 240 VAC output. Can I hookup the 120VAC to the master inverter, or should I get a...


Hello,

I will accept the second option which is getting transformer.

Go ahead and get a transformer in order to step up the voltage. This is better than hooking up the 120V AC to the master inverter.

In summary, get a transformer to step up the voltage.

I hope this is clear now....

Good luck.

Apr 01, 2011 | Xantrex Technology Xantrex SW Series...

1 Answer

The red lightcomes on when i hook up things to it when nothin is hooked up its green


Usually, this indicates an overload condition. I have a Pyramid 35 amp supply that has no green light but uit does have a red light and an irritating little beeper that the instruction book says is activiated when power draw approaches 90% of rated output. (Why not call it a 30 amp supply if you can't use the full 35???) Enough editorializing. You don't say if the supply actually works, just that the light changes color. If it doesn't work at all, I would start with checking the diode bridge for a blown or leaking diode. If one is bad, it can output enough to drive an LED but fail anything else. If these are good, check the filter capacitor. If this is bad, the hum could concievably confuse the regulator circuit. Next, I would check what ever voltage regulator it has in it. I can't comment on specifics as there are many schemes that can be used. My unit, for example, is like a mouse driving an elephant. It has a small 723 regulator IC, (Aprox. 100ma output), controling 4 large TO-3 pass transistors driven by a 36 volt 40 amp transformer to boil it all down to an adjustable 12 to 15 volts.
The bottom line is without knowing if the unit is puting out or not and not having it in my hand to look at, this is the best I can do. I hope it helps.
Good luck.
Jeff

Feb 03, 2011 | Pyramid 10 Amp Power Supply (068888701655)...

3 Answers

Voltage regulator


One of the most common type is the 3 pin - 1 amp voltage regulators in a TO-220 package, they are the 78xx positive regulators and the 79xx negative regulators. The xx denoted the voltage output of the regulator.
I don't know what type of regulator is used in the APN 6003, if you can obtain a circuit diagram it might help you.

Sep 27, 2009 | Motorola System Power Supplies

2 Answers

Problem


There is no "Flyback transformer" in the LCD monitor "Benq 17" model No. Q7T3". Such a component, a "Flyback transformer" is found in televisions and in Picture Tube type monitors. The red wire of a "Flyback transformer" is where 27,000 VOLTS comes out of to connect to the picture and such a voltage IS DEADLY so never enter a TV or computer monitor unless you know exactly what you're doing. To bring your hand too close to the "Flyback transformer" is to GET ZAPPED, you don't even have to TOUCH that transformer or the Red Wire that comes out of it!!!!

As far as a fuse blowing, NEVER PUT IN A FUSE WITH A HIGHER AMPERAGE RATING: it's there to protect certain components from being permanently damaged. If the fuse is blowing you must find out "why". There's got to be a short circuit in one or more components. Transistors, Diodes and Capacitors are easy to check for shorts. Transistors, Diodes are usually what short out. There's not much more I can say here.

A schematic diagram that shows the voltage on the many components of a running LCD circuit is what you need to find out where volatges should be. If a voltage is missing you must find out where the problem stems from. There are other ways to test circuitry, with an oscillascope and a schematic diagram that shows test points and the wave pattern that's suppose to be present.

May 31, 2008 | System Power Supplies

1 Answer

Designing a linear regulated power supply


what you are doing is over **** for 300 mA, now if you will pulling some real wattage then you would need linear regulation.
just use a 10.00 ac adapter . or a zener diode .
the calculations in real time analysis is complex GE has the formula online . but a spike at 300ma will be assorbed by the transformer easilly. if you are protecting delicate circuit then a fuse will not work quickly enough , fry and blow is all they do.
a crowbar circuit is what most designers use nowdays.fast and efficient.
There are plenty of IC regulators on the market that will give these specs but I think your are over thinking your needs unless you have an exact spec for medical research.

Feb 13, 2008 | System Power Supplies

2 Answers

POWER SUPPLY UNIT


Hi, you can almost bet anything that your voltage regulator is at fault. It sounds as if this needs time to build enough resistence to reach the 240 volts required by your computer's PSU.
Change this unit and you should cure your problem.
Question, Why do you need to use a voltage regulator?
Are you running on home generator power?
If you run on mains regulated power then replace the voltage regulator with a power surge protection board.
Regards mistyman

Nov 06, 2007 | System Power Supplies

1 Answer

NO POWER/POWER FAILURE


I'd assume this machine uses an ATX design power supply. ATX and other late designs (after the days of the AT style units) have a standby voltage supply which powers just a small portion of the motherboard circuitry (voltage= +5 volts). Your problem is likely caused by one or more electrolytics in this standby section. If you open the supply, you should see at least 2 switching transformers, likely sitting close to each other. One will be large (for the main/full power) and a small one (for the standby section). Usually the bad capacitor is on the primary side (on the side where the switching transistor is). It may be a 10MFD/50Volt or 47MFD/25Volt, or some value close. If the bad cap is on the secondary side (the section which is connected to your motherboard), then the value will be something like a 1000MFD/10Volt or 16Volt, or 1500MFD, 2200MFD. This capacitor will be physically larger than the one noted for the primary side. I can't tell you the exact location on the board where these capacitors might be, except they will be close to the small transformer mentioned above. If you have a digital camera, and could take a pic or 2, I might be able to point to the exact suspect part. You could send pic to dodgecharger4404@netscape.net. Of course, you need a solder iron/solder, and a little skill...

Jun 27, 2007 | Compaq (243890-001) 250-Watt Power Supply

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