Question about Intermatic ET8215C- 7-Day Electronic Astronomic Time Switch - NEMA 1 Indoor

1 Answer

Im r\putting in a new timer, i have 120 going in to the line, terminal 2 , and 2 load circuits hooked up to termials 4 and 6, neutral on terminal 1. When i power it up i have 120 volts on terminals 1 and 2. I manually set the circuit to on( it's jumped out to simultaneous) and i gte no power to the load circuits. Should i be getting 120 on terminal 1 , the neutral line? I switched to a different neutral that is fed from the BX as the line voltage and the contactors click but doesnt send the feed to the load circuits on 4 and 6. Thanks.

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1 Answer

Http://www.intermatic.com/~/media/files/intermatic/products/instructions/timers/et8215c%20-%20english.ashx

I am looking at the wiring diagram
Im r\putting in a new - 53853da.jpg
The timer is shipped pre-set for 120V
DST enabled
Loads to be independently controlled
Move jumper to SIM for simultaneous operation
STATIC discharge can damage circuit board

neutral on pole 1
hot on pole 2
Now your 120V circuit powers the timer, but it does NOT send power to the other poles

If I understand your explanation correctly ... you have load wires on poles 4 and 6 but no Hot wire connected to poles 3 and 5?

I think you need to run a Hot wire to poles 3 and 5.

To double check this, run a continuity test between Hot pole 2 and poles 3 and 5 ... there is no voltage there ... the switch circuits operate separately from the timer circuit.

Another test ... when you hear the switch click ... test continuity between poles 3 and 4 and then test poles 4 and 5 >>> when the timer is on, those poles have continuity ... so connect Hots to 3 and 5 and the 2 Loads will work.

Posted on Oct 05, 2010

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Which wire color do i hook up to line 1 & line 2?


Question posted under 240volt R8806P101C timer.

240Volt line, both hot wires, line1 and line2, are identical so wire color doesn't matter and either wire can connect to either terminal.

R8806P101C terminal block has 4 screws. 1 2 3 4 from left to right.
240volt wire from circuit breaker connects to terminals 1 and 3
Wire going to 240Volt Load connects to terminals 2 and 4

Resources:
http://waterheatertimer.org/Intermatic-trippers-and-parts.html#sprinkler
http://waterheatertimer.org/B220C.html#120-240

Take a moment and vote on answer:
And take advantage of fixya expert assistance live.
For a price, expert works with you while you work on timer or any do-it-yourself project.
Fixya is always less expensive than a service call.

Aug 28, 2011 | Intermatic R8806P101C -...

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.
Comment by gotgeek2, posted on Jan 08, 2010ckuzkuz, I'm a licensed master electrician in 2 states with 30 years in the trade. I've installed a lot of Intermatic timers over the years. I wrote this tip because I saw that a lot of folks were having problems wiring them.

on Mar 07, 2010 | Garden

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


These instructions are for USA residential wiring only.

VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

Im installing an Intermatic ET104C timer and have in the past installed a few WH40 Intermatic timers with no problem but ive always had 4wire supply or 10/3. This time its a 3wire supply or 10/2 w/ground...


Line voltage is not known.
240Volts has 2 hot wires and no neutral wire.
If both 10-2 wires test hot to ground, then you are working with 240V and no neutral is present.
http://waterheatertimer.org/240-v-water-heater-circuit.html#120-240

ET104C timer is shipped default setting for 240Volts.
ET104C can be wired many different ways.
Terminals 1 and 2 are for running the timer operation. So power lines connect to terminals 1 and 2.
Terminals 3 4 5 6 are dry. They have no power when wires are connected to terminals 1 and 2.
Typical 240v ET104C wiring shows next image.
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/ET-water-heater-circuit2-40.jpg

Jun 18, 2011 | Intermatic INC ET104C 24 HOUR ELECTRONIC...

1 Answer

Can I use my Intermatic model T-103 switch for 2 separate 20amp 120v circuits?


Yes, the timer motor is 120 volt, so connect both neutrals from each separate 120 volt circuit to the "A" terminal. Probably best to place all the neutrals (line and load) under a wirenut with a jumper going to the "A" terminal. The terminals are intended for only two wires.
One hot will go to terminal #1 and the other will go to terminal #3. The 120 volt timer motor is connected internally at the factory to the "A" terminal and terminal #1.

Dec 07, 2010 | Intermatic T104M 208-277Volt 40-amp Timer...

1 Answer

How do I wire an intermatic t-103 timer switch


The T-103 has a 120Volt clock motor

From there, the wiring can go two directions depending on your Load voltage (load is the fan, light or motor that timer turns on-off)

Here is a link that shows exact wiring:
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html#T103

When wiring the T-103, steps 1-2-3 are true for 120V or 240V installation:
1) A white Neutral wire is always connected to terminal A (Neutral wire connects to Neutral busbar in breaker box)
2) A black Hot wire is always connected to terminal 1 >> this hot wire can come from 120V or 240V breaker
3) Black wire going to Load (fan, light, motor) is always connected to terminal 2
The following step is true for 120V Load
4) if Load is 120V, then white wire from Load connects to terminal A
The following steps are true for 240V Load
5) Only the neutral wire connects to terminal A as described in (1
6) The second Black hot from breaker box (240V has 2 hot wires) connects to terminal 3
7) The second White going to Load connects to terminal 4

Here are 2 more links that show how 120V and 240V circuits are wired
http://waterheatertimer.org/See-inside-main-breaker-box.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/B220C.html

Oct 21, 2010 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

1 Answer

I have a T103 Intermatic timer controlling the circuit for outdoor lighting. I used it to replace a wall timer with inadequate capacity (was designed to control a lamp or similar). Problem is that when the...


Let's review your wiring. There's probably something miswired when you get symptoms like that. Let's work one circuit at a time.

For circuit #1, the incoming (LINE) black (hot) wire is connected to the #3 terminal. The white (neutral) is connected to the "A" terminal. The bare equipment grounding wire is connected to the "GR" terminal (the green screw on the case).

The outgoing (LOAD) black wire to the first set of lights is connected to terminal #4 and the outgoing white (neutral) wire connects to the "A" terminal. The outgoing bare wire to the lights goes to the "GR" terminal. It's best to twist the wires together with a pigtail, wirenut them and connect the pigtail to the "GR" terminal.

Now for separate circuit #2. The incoming (LINE) black (hot) connects to terminal #1. The incoming white (neutral) connects to terminal "A". The incoming bare wire connects to the "GR" terminal.

The outgoing (LOAD) black wire to the 2nd set of lights connects to the #2 terminal. The outgoing white (neutral) goes to the "A" terminal. It's OK to twist all the white neutral wires (incoming _and_ outgoing for _both_ circuits) together with a pigtail that goes to the "A" terminal. Use a red wirenut.

As long as you don't load the 15 amp breaker over 12 amps (this is considered a continuous circuit and it cannot be loaded over 80% per NEC), you don't have to have two circuits if you don't want too. Figure about 1 amp per light as long as the lights aren't over 100 watt. (100 watt lamp/120 volts = 0.83 amps (round to one amp)

Jan 02, 2010 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

2 Answers

Clock doesn't work


The wiring diagram for that timer is somewhat misleading. The 120 volt clock timer motor is connected internally to the "A" (neutral) terminal and the #3 terminal. The "A" (neutral) terminal is to the immediate left of the #1 terminal.
Here's how to do the wiring for your use, (assuming a 120 volt supply circuit and a 120 volt lighting or other load):
Connect the incoming power (line) black wire to terminal # 3. Connect the incoming (neutral) white wire to terminal "A".
Connect the outgoing (load) black wire to terminal # 4.
Connect the outgoing (neutral) white wire to terminal "A".

Mar 08, 2009 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

3 Answers

Clock want work


The wiring is incorrect. The wiring diagram for that timer is misleading. The 120 volt clock timer motor is connected internally to the "A" (neutral) terminal and the #3 terminal. The "A" (neutral) terminal is to the immediate left of the #1 terminal.
Here's how to do the wiring for your use, (assuming a 120 volt supply circuit and a 120 volt light circuit):
Connect the incoming power (line) black wire to terminal # 3. Connect the incoming (neutral) white wire to terminal "A".
Connect the outgoing (load) black wire to terminal # 4.
Connect the outgoing (neutral) white wire to terminal "A".

Feb 27, 2009 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

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