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Chassis Temp Test - 119 degrees Fan Speed Stest -9854 s/b 8000 +12 Volt rail test - 8.36 s/b 12.50 +5 Volts Raid Test- 3.60 s/b 5.25 -5Volts Rais Test Min value exceeds max - min -4.75 max -5.25 +3.3 Volt Rail Test - 2.18 - S/b 3.15-3.45 I have no idea what is wrong. Could it be the power supply unit?

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  • lori3retire Oct 04, 2010

    Chassis Temp Test - 119 degrees
    Fan Speed test -9854 s/b 8000
    12 Volt rail test - 8.36 s/b 12.50
    5 Volts Raid Test- 3.60 s/b 5.25
    -5Volts Rail Test Min value exceeds max - min -4.75 max -5.25
    3.3 Volt Rail Test - 2.18 - S/b 3.15-3.45
    I have no idea what is wrong. Could it be the power supply unit?

  • lori3retire Oct 04, 2010

    Chassis Temp Test - 119 degrees
    Fan Speed test -9854 s/b 8000

    +12 Volt rail test - 8.36 s/b 12.50

    +5 Volts Raid Test- 3.60 s/b 5.25

    -5Volts Rail Test Min value exceeds max - min -4.75 max -5.25
    +3.3 Volt Rail Test - 2.18 - S/b 3.15-3.45
    I have no idea what is wrong. Could it be the power supply unit?

  • lori3retire Oct 04, 2010

    I have no idea. How would I find out?
    I have a pc diagnostics program and those are the errors that I got. I can not afford to get a new computer so I was hoping that it would be an easy fix.

  • lori3retire Oct 04, 2010

    are you still there?

  • lori3retire Oct 04, 2010

    Can anyone tell what is wrong with my computer

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3 Answers

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  • 1,768 Answers

If you have added a larger hard drive or other components this has a large current draw on the power supply and will result in overheating.
The CPU also has as effect on the current draw on a power supply therefore a new power supply is warranted that is you will need to install a power supply that is either 500 watts or more to give the performance and current supply the components need. Also if you have a gaming machine or you use it as such most of the time then there is high CPU usage that will result in high heat dissipation.
There is a free download that will regulate the cpu fan speed if *********** board is compatible >>>> it is called "speed fan" If your PC is used a lot you will need to clean it frequently of dust. I also recommend large cooling fan be installed to dissipate the hot air inside the PC cabinet. ( example: 2 ( 220 cfm) for exhaust and intake to the cabinet.
I hope this helps. Have a great day!

Posted on Oct 05, 2010

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  • Master
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All the measures (almost) are wrong. This could be either from the power supply or by fault of the motherboard (sometimes the sensors cause these errors). A multimeter (if available) could help you to check the +12Volt (between yellow and black wires) and +5Volt (between red and black wires) at any available power connector (these ones with the 4 pins for hard disks, dvds etc)

In case of a problem or clarification, don't hesitate to post me a reply before rejecting my answer.
If you are satisfied, accept my solution.

Thanks and regards
Stelios
direct fixya link: http://www.fixya.com/users/technical114

Posted on Oct 04, 2010

  • Stelios
    Stelios Oct 05, 2010

    Did you take any measurments from the power cable I suggested?

    In case of a problem or clarification, don't hesitate to post me a reply before rejecting my answer.
    If you are satisfied, accept my solution.

    Thanks and regards
    Stelios
    direct FixYa link:http://www.fixya.com/users/technical114

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  • Master
  • 2,777 Answers

It is very hard to read the layout of your question there since it's all in one line... can you retype it / copy and paste it into individual lines for me? It does definitely sound like your power supply is either sending irregular voltage or the south-bridge on your motherboard is actually going bad.

If you ignore the error (your bios should let you do this) does the machine operate fine otherwise?

Please reply back with the voltages on their own lines and I can confirm, will try to continue to decipher here.

Thanks
Tim

Posted on Oct 04, 2010

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  • Tim Grayson
    Tim Grayson Oct 04, 2010

    Ah ok, that is very helpful. It looks like a raid controller irregularity, that would be a problem on the motherboard itself not your power supply. Do you even have a RAID on this system though?

    Thanks
    Tim

  • Tim Grayson
    Tim Grayson Oct 04, 2010

    It shows you rejected my answer so I can no longer help, but I did have the answer for you :(
    Tim

  • Tim Grayson
    Tim Grayson Oct 05, 2010

    Hmmm wish I could have worked with you more... I know what is going on here

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Fault finding


Power is going to the motherboard, and you know this by assuming?

An assumption would be you see the Power Supply fan spin, LED lights light up, and maybe computer case fans spin.

Not an assumption, and you would have tested the 3 main voltage power rails, coming out of the Power Supply.

The Power Supply in your computer is an SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply. (Also is known as the short abbreviation - PSU. Power Supply Unit)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

The Power Supply in your computer is a Converter.
It converts HIGH AC voltage into 3 LOW DC voltages.

[Depending on country,
USA = 120 Volts AC. UK = 240 Volts AC. Japan is 100 Volts AC, but may depend on area. Australia = 240 Volts AC. India = 240 Volts AC. HOWEVER, do not write the above in stone. I may have made an error ]

The 3 low main DC Voltages coming out of the Power Supply is;
A) 3.3 Volts DC
B) 5 Volts DC
C) 12 Volts DC

Orange wires carry 3.3 Volts DC
Red wires carry 5 Volts DC
Yellow wires carry 12 Volts DC
ALL Black wires are Ground wires. They can also be called Negative wires.
This is a DC circuit now. There is a Positive, and a Negative.
Orange, Red, and Yellow wires are power wires, and also Positive wires.

The first part of your diagnosis will be to test those 3 main voltage power rails.

[Digressing;
Using an example;
There are many Red wires coming out of the Power Supply.
These are 5 Volt wires. They are Connected TO, the 5 Volt power rail in the Power Supply.
ALL 5 Volt wires end in one place, in the Power Supply.
The 5 Volt power rail.
When you test just ONE red wire, you are testing the entire 5 Volt power rail coming from the Power Supply.

This also goes for the Orange wires, and Yellow wires ]

With the Red 5 Volt wires, and Yellow 12 Volt wires, you could just use a 4-pin Peripheral power cable to check them,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Multimeter set to DC Voltage, the red (Positive) probe lead of the multimeter; touches the female metal terminal connector, for the Red wire.

http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/28-9420&utm_medium=Affiliate&ref=cj&utm_campaign=CommissionJunction&utm_source=CommissionJunction?t=2&utm_expid=8634549-14

The black (Negative) probe lead of the multimeter, touches a female metal terminal connector, that goes to a Black wire.

You should be reading 5 Volts DC.

Same thing for the Yellow 12 Volt wire.

With an Orange 3.3 Volt wire, this changes.
A straightened out paperclip is inserted, down into the BACK of the ATX main power cable's connector; AND into a socket hole with an Orange wire in it.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

The straightened out paperclip, slides down into the socket hole, with the Orange wire in it.
Slides down into the socket hole, RIGHT NEXT TO the orange insulation of the wire, and MUST go down far enough; to Touch that female metal terminal connector.

EVERY wire going down into the ATX main power cable's connector, ends in a female metal terminal connector.

Same thing is down with a socket hole that has a Black wire in it.
ALL Black wires are Ground wires. (Negative)
You can choose ANY socket hole that has a Black wire in it.

Now touch the two probe leads of the multimeter, to their respective straightened out paperclips.

Red (Positive) probe lead of multimeter, to straightened out paperclip in Orange wire socket hole.
Black (Negative) probe lead of multimeter, to straightened out paperclip in Back wire socket hole.

You should be reading 3.3 Volts DC.

(Or if your multimeter kit has special probe lead, that would take the place of a straightened out paperclip, of course use it instead)

Know this;
A) If ALL of the LED's ('lights') were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

B) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

C) A typical CPU (Processor) can use 51 to 130 Watts of power.
Just depends on what Processor (CPU) it is.

This is why a Power Supply with a weak voltage power rail, will not have enough power to turn the Processor ON, but will have enough power to light those simpy LED's, and spin fans.

[LED - Light Emitting Diode ]

Regards,
joecoolvette

May 11, 2013 | Dell Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Power failure of motherboard


"power failure of motherboard"

I'm lost. Since when does a motherboard produce power?

Power failure AT motherboard?

You have tested the 3 main voltage power rails, coming out of the Power Supply?
A) 3.3 Volts DC
B) 5 Volts DC
C) 12 Volts DC

[In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC ]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_power_supply#Wiring_diagrams

[ From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_power_supply ]

http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=2439#ov

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

ALL Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
ALL Red wires are 5 Volts
ALL Yellow wires are 12 Volts.
ALL are DC Voltage

ALL Black wires are Ground wires. Means Negative wires. ( - )
All power wires named above are Positive wires. ( + )

(This is a DC circuit)

Multimeter:
Positive (Red) probe lead to power wires, one at a time.
Negative ( Black) probe lead stays connected to ANY Black wire.

Looking at the Playtool link, observe the photo to the Right.
Shows 24-pin ATX main power cable plugged into motherboard.
This is what you want.

The Back of the connector is where the wires go in.
The Back of the connector, is where the straightened out paperclip goes in.

I straighten out a paperclip, and insert down into the socket hole; of the power wire to be tested.

(Orange, or Red, or Yellow)

Straightened out paperclip, slides RIGHT NEXT TO the existing wire.

Look at middle photo. See the Front of the connector? You can barely make out the ends, of the female metal terminal connectors.
This is a closer look,

http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/28-9420&utm_medium=Affiliate&ref=cj&utm_campaign=CommissionJunction&utm_source=CommissionJunction

At the bottom of the photo is the Front; of the female metal terminal connector.

At the Top is the Back of the connector.
The straightened out paperclip, MUST slide down into the socket hole; far enough to touch the Back of the connector.

Now do the same for ANY Black wire.
Power Supply now plugged into power, you can now touch the multimeter's probe leads, to the straightened out paperclips.

Two paperclips used at one time.
Test each voltage power rail, one at a time.

When I state Voltage Power Rail;

3.3 Volt power rail.
ALL of those Orange wires end at one central point, in the Power Supply; the 3.3 Volt power rail.

This means you can test ANY Orange wire, and be testing the 3.3 Volt power rail.

Same goes for the 5 Volt power rail. (Red wires)
Same goes for the 12 Volt power rail. (Yellow wires)

What are the voltages? Post back in a Comment.

OR,
Use a KNOWN to be good, Compatible power supply; for a temporary test unit.

Power Supply checks out OK, or you are using a KNOWN to be good, Power Supply?

What do the Electrolytic Capacitors look like? See any bad ones?
(Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor)

http://capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/index.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lut7MX5Dd_A

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Mar 25, 2013 | Gigabyte GA-M61VME-S2 Motherboard

1 Answer

My 1991 ford f150 is accting up. when I start it cold it runs good, but if I run it a wile and re start it, it bogs down and spits some, gas fumes are strong too. the check engine light come on


The first thing i would look at is the coolant temp sensor, ford had a lot of run problems due to the coolant temp sensor.

This sensor is located next to thermostat housing, sometimes on the coolant pipe on the front top of the engine.

The easiest way is to replace the sensor and try it as the sensor is not expensive. or you can ohm or volt test the sensor when you are having the problem. there is a chart i will try to enclose to switch the readings to temperture. so if the truck is hot and you get a reading off the sensor that reads -10 degrees then sensor is bad.

The only other thing i can think off would be to check the fuel pressure regulator for a leaking diafram, when this happens the gas is pulled into engine through the vacuum hose going to regulator inturn making engine run rich.
50degees =3.5vlt or 58,750ohms
68 degrees= 3.1v or 37,300ohm
86 degree = 2.6 volts or 24,270 ohm
104 degrees =2.1v or 16,150 ohm
122 degree =1.7 volts or 10,970ohms
140 degrees =1.3 volts or 7,700
158 degrees =1.0 volt or 5,370ohms
176 degrees =0.8 volts or 384 ohms
194 degrees = 0.6 volts or 280ohms
212 degrees = 0.5 volts or 207 ohms
230 degrees =0.4 volts or 155 ohms
Hope this helps good day.

Mar 04, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a EMACHINE W5243 with a MCP61SM-GM Motherboard. When I press the power button the keyboard lites flash, fans come up to full speed than drop to a slower speed, than I get beeps about every...


Suggest Don, that you check the voltage power rails in the Power Supply, first. Make sure the Power Supply is working correctly.

Power Supply voltages check out, look VERY close at the motherboard.
(Power unplugged to computer, Anti-Static Precautions taken, motherboard OUT in hand )

Reasoning?

http://www.e4allupgraders.info/dir1/motherboards/socketam2/ecsMCP61SM-GM.shtml

eMachines are budget computers. Nothing wrong with that. Problem is the manufacturer saved the consumer on the cost, by using two low quality components.

A) The Power Supply
B) The motherboard

Both of these come up for the BIOS Beep Code you stated.

Power Supply's are usually Bestec, Delta, or HiPro.
These particular generic units use low quality Electrolytic Capacitors, MOSFET's, Rectifier Bridge, less than adequate gauge of wiring, and so on.

The motherboards, (MSI, ECS, TriGem, etc), use low quality Electrolytic Capacitors.
This is generally the item/s that go bad first. They are the 'weakest link'.

Yes, Electrolytic Capacitors are the weakest link in the Power Supply, also.

In the Power Supply they are used as Filters. They filter the incoming AC electricity, (Input Stage), and the outgoing DC electricity. (Output Stage)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

I really feel the problem is the Power Supply.
Why?
1) If ALL of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power. Just depends on what Processor it is. (Older Intel Pentium III's, II's, and so on, use less power than 51 Watts. Same with older AMD processors )

(The PSU { Power Supply Unit} in your personal computer is a SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply)

Click on the photo to the upper right, in the link above. The letter B is on the top of an Electrolytic Capacitor. You are looking at a Top View.
The blue ring is part of a plastic sleeve, which goes around the 'can' case of the capacitor.
These large capacitors are in the Input Stage.

The letter E is near a few more Electrolytic Capacitors. These capacitors are in the Output Stage.
These capacitors are Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors.
This is a side view of an example,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Capacitors_electrolytic.jpg

The top capacitor is an Axial Electrolytic Capacitor. The leads come out of each end. The bottom capacitor is a Radial Electrolytic Capacitor. Both leads come out of the same end. The capacitors in your Power Supply, and on your motherboard, are Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors.

Your Power Supply converts AC electricity form your home, or business, and turns it into low DC electricity.

A) The 3.3 Volt power rail
B) The 5 Volt power rail
C) The 12 Volt power rail.
(In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC )

In the power cables coming from the Power Supply.
1) Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
2) Red wires are 5 Volts
3) Yellow wires are 12 Volts
(All DC voltage)
Black wires are Ground wires.

Now, about the voltage power rail.
All 3.3 volt wires (Orange), end in one central 3.3 Volt point, in the Power Supply.
The central point is the 3.3 Volt power rail.

Same for the 5 Volt power rail. All 5 Volt wires (Red), end in one central 5 Volt point, in the Power Supply.
Same for the 12 Volt power rail.

This means, for example, if you test one Orange wire, and it shows 3.3 Volts on the multimeter, the 3.3 Volt power rail is good.
Test one Red wire in a power cable. Shows 5 Volts, or VERY near?
The 5 Volt power rail is good.
Same thing for the 12 Volt power rail.

One method to check the 5 Volt power rail, and the 12 Volt power rail.
Use a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable. (The connector on the cable is misnomered as a 'Molex' connector),

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Most of the time there is an unused Peripheral power cable.
You can use it's Red wire, Yellow wire, and Black wire, to test for 5 Volts, and 12 Volts.

Disregard the following if you are aware;
An economical multimeter can be purchased for around $5 to $12.
Available in a multitude of stores. An auto parts store is but one example.
Analog, or Digital, is fine.

The Red lead is the Positive lead. The metal tip is the probe. I refer to both as the Positive probe lead.
The Black lead is the Negative lead.

The Positive probe lead ALWAYS goes to the power wire to be tested.
3.3 Volt, or 5 Volt, or 12 Volt.
The Negative lead ALWAYS goes to Ground. (A-N-Y Black wire, is a Ground wire)

Computer sitting on a table, or workbench, computer case open, 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, untangled, and pulled to the outside where you can access it easily, the computer is plugged into power.

The center knob in the middle of the multimeter, is the Function Knob.
It is set to DC Voltage.
If there are only symbols, the symbol is a dotted line over a solid line.
(NOT a curved line over a solid line)

If there is more than one setting for DC Voltage, set it to the 0 to 50 Volt scale.

Turn the computer on. Holding the connector in your hand, of the 4-pin Peripheral power cable, insert the Positive probe lead's tip, into the socket hole with the Red wire.

Hold the probe lead, with the hand that is already holding the connector. With the other hand, insert the Negative probe lead's tip, into the socket hole with one of the two Black wires.

Watch the multimeter. You should be reading close to 5 Volts.
Test the 12 Volt wire using this method also. (Yellow wire, and Black wire. Black wire is Ground. Either one of them)

The 3.3 Volt power rail is tested using the Orange wire, in the 24-pin ATX main power cable.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

Power cable plugged into the motherboard, as in the photo to the right.
At the end of every wire, going into that long whitish connector with 24 socket holes, is a metal terminal.

The metal terminal is pretty far down in the socket hole. The probe lead must touch the metal terminal, but cannot due to it's size.
Use a straightened out paper clip.

The paper clip's diameter is small enough to slide into the socket hole, RIGHT NEXT TO the Orange wire, and touch the metal terminal.
Then the Positive probe lead is held against it. (Or with an alligator clip attachment, it is clipped on)

Do the same for A-N-Y of the Black wires. They are all Ground wires. Pick one. Insert a straightened out paper clip. The Negative probe lead touches it.
(Paper clips inserted, THEN computer turned on. It is only 3.3 Volts DC, but I want you to feel safe)

More in a Comment.

Dec 13, 2011 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

2 Answers

Pls help my computer shows no display


CPU fan runs, harddrive picks up, but no display.

1) Bad Power Supply
Or
2) Bad graphics chipset.

The two main factors for desktop computer failure, is a bad power supply, and/or the computer is dirty inside.

A) Bad Power Supply

Weak voltage power rail
Enough power to light LED lights, and perhaps spin fans, but not enough power to turn the Processor on.

IF all of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts

A typical Processor can use from 51 to 125 Watts.
Just depends on what Processor it is, as to what the maximum Wattage usage is.

CPU fan runs? Sure. It's only using 2 to 3 Watts.

Harddrive 'picks up'? You will hear the Spindle Motor spinning the Platters inside. Means nothing.

With no Processor running, BIOS can not hand the computer over to the Operating System. (WinXP is one example of an O/S)

There is nothing to find the Boot Record, on one of those Platters inside the harddrive.

(Explanation of physical construction of an average Harddrive,

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/hard-disk.htm )

You can check the Power Supply voltages out. See if there is a weak voltage power rail.

Power coming into the Power Supply is the dangerous voltage.
Power coming out of the Power Supply is not.

The Power Supply in your Personal Computer is an SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

Your Power Supply converts the electricity from your home, or business, into three main voltages,

A) 3.3 Volts
B) 5 Volts
C) 12 Volts

All are DC voltage. (The incoming electricity from your home or business, is AC voltage)
{In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC}

Use a multimeter to test the voltages. If you do not have access to one, an economical multimeter can be purchased for around $8 to $12. A multitude of stores carry them. An auto parts store is but one example.
Analog or digital, it doesn't matter. (I prefer Analog)

Set the Function Knob to DC voltage. (If just a symbol is used it is a dotted line over a solid line)

If there is more than one setting for DC Voltage, set it to the 0 to 50 Volts scale. (0-50)

The red probe lead is the Positive lead.
The black probe lead is the Negative lead.

The Positive probe lead touches the power wire
The Negative probe lead touches a Ground wire.

The 3.3 Volt power rail, the 5 Volt power rail, and the 12 Volt power rail, are the power wires.
Test one at a time.

ALL Black wires are GROUND wires.

Test at the ATX main power cable's connector.
The ATX main power cable is plugged into the motherboard. The Power Supply is plugged into power.

The ATX main power cable used for a Gigabyte GA-K8VM800M motherboard,
is a 20-pin ATX main power cable. This is an example of a 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Note the photo to the far right. The ATX main power cable is plugged into the motherboard.
Testing the voltages is done at the Back of the connector. Back of the ATX main power cable connector. The Back of the connector is where the wires go in.

The probe leads tips, will not fit down into the socket holes, next to the wires already present.
Suggest use an adapter. Suggested adapter is a paper clip.

The paper clip is straightened out, then inserted down into the socket hole, RIGHT NEXT TO THE WIRE that is already there.
The paper clip Must go down into the socket hole, to touch a metal terminal.

At the end of every wire going into the ATX main power cable connector, is a metal terminal. You have to go down past the insulation of the wire, and touch the metal terminal with the paper clip.

A) The Orange insulated wires are 3.3 Volts
B) The Red wires are 5 Volts
C) The Yellow wires are 12 Volts.

Example to test a 3.3 Volt power rail;

Power Supply unplugged from power insert a straightened out paper clip into a socket hole with an Orange wire. Leave it sticking up.

Now insert a straightened out paper clip, into ANY socket hole with a Black wire. (Ground)

Plug the Power Supply into power. Touch the red Positive probe lead of the multimeter, to the paper clip for the Orange wire. Hold it there.
Now touch the black Negative probe lead to the paper clip for the Ground wire.
(Black wire)

You should read VERY close to 3.3 Volts.

Same procedure for the 5 Volt power rail, and the 12 Volt power rail.

{Power Rail;
All 3.3 Volt (Orange wires), end at one central point in the Power Supply.
This central point is the 3.3 Volt power rail.
Same for the 5 Volt, and 12 Volt wires.

You can test any wire of that voltage, and be testing the entire power rail, for that voltage }

Power Supply checks out?
Graphics chipset.

Chp and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_Circuit

The graphics chipset is a GPU.
Graphics Processing Unit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPU

A GPU can be soldered directly to the motherboard, or to a removable card.

Soldered directly to the motherboard is Integrated Graphics.
Also known as OnBoard graphics. (ON the motherBOARD)

Soldered to a removable card is a Graphics Card.
(Full name is Graphics Adapter Card)

If you are using Integrated Graphics, try using a graphics card.
If the graphics card works, the problem is bad Integrated Graphics on the motherboard.
The graphics card bypasses using Integrated Graphics.

{The above is that you are seeing No Signal on the monitor.
If not check the monitor, AND the monitor cable to see if they are good. Test on a known to be good, working computer }

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Nov 05, 2011 | Gigabyte GA-K8VM800M Motherboard

3 Answers

I have an 89 camaro the cooling fan will not work unless you unplug the temperature sensor or hotwire it. I have replaced the temp. sensor and fan relay. I have tested wires to sensor from the sensor to...


Hi

Unplug the coolant temperature sensor while the engine is running. This should cause the fans to turn on low then kick to high, IIRC.
Typically when the engine computer loses the signal from the coolant temp sensor, it just turns both fans on high so the engine will not overheat. Ultimately, the fan is controlled by the computer. When it receives a signal from the temp sensor that reads the appropriate temp, it turns the fan on. One easy option is to wire a switch to the cooling fan relay. Then you can turn it on and off when you need it. I would not recommend running the fan constantly. You will burn out the fan motor and you'll never get up to normal temp for your sensors.

Check for coolant level and bad motor.

However as far as the fans and "disconnecting them from the temp sensor"..... The fans DO NOT connect directly to the temp sensor. They connect to the PCM (computer). The PCM reads the coolant temp sensor, and determines when to turn on the fans. It also uses the coolant temperature to control several other functions, including the transition from "open loop" A/F ratio control to "closed loop" A/F ratio control. It uses the temp to set the idle speed on cold start. It uses the temp to determine the cold start fuel enrichment. If you run this way, your car will be hard to start, it will run excessively rich, wasting fuel, and possibly even damaging the engine by diluting the oil.

Please get back to us if you have further query or else please accept this "particular" solution.

Sep 18, 2011 | 1989 Chevrolet Camaro

1 Answer

I have a 95 mustang 3.8L manual. The fan will not come on, i can bypass everything and get it going. Its getting ground, the relay in the ccrm works. When i tested the voltage in the wires right before the...


It could be the water temp.switch located on the drivers side of the engine. Be sure you have the water temp switch.If your not sure then take it to someone who is or if you have a chilton car manual it should guide you right to it. Hanes manuals are availible at your local auto parts store and they will give you test procedures to check out the switch if you own a volt-ohm meter, Hope this was helpful.

Sep 25, 2010 | 1995 Ford Mustang

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