Question about Kodak EasyShare Z740 Digital Camera

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No flash after 2 years

Any idea where to send the camera for a new flash bulb? Camera is now 2 years old, over 40,000 photos. Now the flash has refused to work. Pics are fine in regular light, but need the flash. Looking for suggestions on where to send and estimated cost to repair.

Thanks

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  • Bobby Russell
    Bobby Russell Aug 14, 2008

    no flash after two years

  • Anonymous Oct 27, 2008

    My flash started flashing really bright like it was going to burn out and sure enough it did. I hae only had my camera for about 6 months!!!!

  • spdoble Nov 08, 2008

    I have the exact same problem. The camera is great, but the flash stopped working a couple of months ago. There is nothing in the manual about this problem, surprisingly.
    Any suggestions are appreciated.


  • Missin Flash Dec 04, 2008

    I LOVED my camera for about 2 years! It still takes great outside pictures, but the flash doesn't work. I'm torn between purchasing a new one or replacing the flash at close to the same cost. Was wondering which is better, what others have done? How long will the replacement flash last & what's the life on the new ones?

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Sounds like you might need a new bulb. I just looked up on kodak.com They have all kinds of parts but the labor to fix it can be expencive says it about $138.00 to fix the flash.

Posted on Jul 27, 2008

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Yes, the flash can burn out or the flash circuit can short out. You can send it in for service but, since it's out of warranty, it will be very expensive. B&H photo has a refurbished one for $70. If you send yours in, what you will get back is a refurbished one....they do not bother to fix point-and -shoot cameras. Your choice.

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Has the camera been dropped at all? It may need a new bulb. Most camera stores replace them rather cheap.. But if you want to do it yourself..
How to Replace Your Digital Camera Flash Bulb Like any light bulb, your camera flash bulb can blow at any time. The rest of your camera might be state of the art, but the flash bulb itself is relying on some pretty old fashioned technology. Unlike a light bulb, however, replacing a flash bulb can be a little difficult. Depending on the type of camera or flash you have, some dissection might be required.
Step 1: Choosing the Bulb There are literally dozens of different shapes, sizes and connectors used for camera flash bulbs. These will typically vary depending on the manufacturer. However, be warned, many manufacturers will use different types of bulbs in different cameras. Just because you have a Fuji camera, for example, doesn't mean you can buy any Fuji flash bulb.
Step 2: Safety First Camera manufacturers will never advise you to replace the camera bulb yourself unless you know exactly what you are doing. This is because your camera's flash uses very high voltages. A capacitor will be charged up in order to fire the flash. This capacitor can stay charged for months, if not years. If you're not confident doing this job yourself, then you will need to take it to a camera repair shop.
Sometimes if the camera is too old, you might consider using it as an excuse to upgrade it for a newer model rather than repairing it.
Step 3: Dismantling the Camera Now, you will need to dismantle the camera carefully so that you have access to the flash bulb itself. This may be time consuming and nerve-wracking. One false move could end up breaking the delicate plastic case of your camera.
Once the camera is dismantled, you should then discharge the capacitor safely so that you can continue to work on the camera.
Step 4: Removing the Old Bulb Most bulbs are soldered directly onto the circuit board. In this case, you will need to use a soldering iron to heat up the solder at the back of the bulb and carefully pull it away from the board. This can be difficult, as you need three hands to do it properly. With the old bulb removed, try to clean up the solder pads as much as possible so that the new bulb can fit properly.
Step 5: Replacing the Bulb Push the legs of the replacement flash bulb in position through the holes in the circuit board. Then, using a soldering iron and some solder, fix it in place. Be as accurate as possible to prevent shorting out the circuit. With the bulb in place, cut back the legs of the flash bulb so that it doesn't stick out too far from the board.
Step 6: Reassembly With the replacement flash bulb fitted in the digital camera, you will then need to reassemble your camera. This will be easier if you kept all of the screws in a safe place.This is the one occasion where it's a good idea to assemble before testing simply because of the high voltages involved.
Step 7: Testing Now, put the battery back in the battery and try taking a photo with the flash. Check whether it works; if not, you will need to investigate the cause of the problem

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Step 1: Choosing the Bulb There are literally dozens of different shapes, sizes and connectors used for camera flash bulbs. These will typically vary depending on the manufacturer. However, be warned, many manufacturers will use different types of bulbs in different cameras. Just because you have a Fuji camera, for example, doesn't mean you can buy any Fuji flash bulb.
Step 2: Safety First Camera manufacturers will never advise you to replace the camera bulb yourself unless you know exactly what you are doing. This is because your camera's flash uses very high voltages. A capacitor will be charged up in order to fire the flash. This capacitor can stay charged for months, if not years. If you're not confident doing this job yourself, then you will need to take it to a camera repair shop.
Sometimes if the camera is too old, you might consider using it as an excuse to upgrade it for a newer model rather than repairing it.
Step 3: Dismantling the Camera Now, you will need to dismantle the camera carefully so that you have access to the flash bulb itself. This may be time consuming and nerve-wracking. One false move could end up breaking the delicate plastic case of your camera.
Once the camera is dismantled, you should then discharge the capacitor safely so that you can continue to work on the camera.
Step 4: Removing the Old Bulb Most bulbs are soldered directly onto the circuit board. In this case, you will need to use a soldering iron to heat up the solder at the back of the bulb and carefully pull it away from the board. This can be difficult, as you need three hands to do it properly. With the old bulb removed, try to clean up the solder pads as much as possible so that the new bulb can fit properly.
Step 5: Replacing the Bulb Push the legs of the replacement flash bulb in position through the holes in the circuit board. Then, using a soldering iron and some solder, fix it in place. Be as accurate as possible to prevent shorting out the circuit. With the bulb in place, cut back the legs of the flash bulb so that it doesn't stick out too far from the board.
Step 6: Reassembly With the replacement flash bulb fitted in the digital camera, you will then need to reassemble your camera. This will be easier if you kept all of the screws in a safe place.This is the one occasion where it's a good idea to assemble before testing simply because of the high voltages involved.
Step 7: Testing Now, put the battery back in the battery and try taking a photo with the flash. Check whether it works; if not, you will need to investigate the cause of the problem

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1 Answer

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How to Replace Your Digital Camera Flash Bulb Like any light bulb, your camera flash bulb can blow at any time. The rest of your camera might be state of the art, but the flash bulb itself is relying on some pretty old fashioned technology. Unlike a light bulb, however, replacing a flash bulb can be a little difficult. Depending on the type of camera or flash you have, some dissection might be required.
Step 1: Choosing the Bulb There are literally dozens of different shapes, sizes and connectors used for camera flash bulbs. These will typically vary depending on the manufacturer. However, be warned, many manufacturers will use different types of bulbs in different cameras. Just because you have a Fuji camera, for example, doesn't mean you can buy any Fuji flash bulb.
Step 2: Safety First Camera manufacturers will never advise you to replace the camera bulb yourself unless you know exactly what you are doing. This is because your camera's flash uses very high voltages. A capacitor will be charged up in order to fire the flash. This capacitor can stay charged for months, if not years. If you're not confident doing this job yourself, then you will need to take it to a camera repair shop.
Sometimes if the camera is too old, you might consider using it as an excuse to upgrade it for a newer model rather than repairing it.
Step 3: Dismantling the Camera Now, you will need to dismantle the camera carefully so that you have access to the flash bulb itself. This may be time consuming and nerve-wracking. One false move could end up breaking the delicate plastic case of your camera.
Once the camera is dismantled, you should then discharge the capacitor safely so that you can continue to work on the camera.
Step 4: Removing the Old Bulb Most bulbs are soldered directly onto the circuit board. In this case, you will need to use a soldering iron to heat up the solder at the back of the bulb and carefully pull it away from the board. This can be difficult, as you need three hands to do it properly. With the old bulb removed, try to clean up the solder pads as much as possible so that the new bulb can fit properly.
Step 5: Replacing the Bulb Push the legs of the replacement flash bulb in position through the holes in the circuit board. Then, using a soldering iron and some solder, fix it in place. Be as accurate as possible to prevent shorting out the circuit. With the bulb in place, cut back the legs of the flash bulb so that it doesn't stick out too far from the board.
Step 6: Reassembly With the replacement flash bulb fitted in the digital camera, you will then need to reassemble your camera. This will be easier if you kept all of the screws in a safe place.This is the one occasion where it's a good idea to assemble before testing simply because of the high voltages involved.
Step 7: Testing Now, put the battery back in the battery and try taking a photo with the flash. Check whether it works; if not, you will need to investigate the cause of the problem

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Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

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