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I just purchased a used SX 3800 Receiver and upon viewing the back panel, suspect a pre-amp maybe required. What is required or compatible? This is a first for me.

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HI... NO pre-amp required.
Pioneer made it so you can send the pre-amp signal to a larger power amp ( if you want to)...Either there is a switch to jumper the "pre-out" to the "power in" jacks OR you need to connect a couple of RCA (phono style) cables between them

Posted on Oct 04, 2010

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1 Answer

I'm connecting Bose 901 speakers with an Active Equilizer hookup required to my new Pioneer VSX-520. What in/out puts should be used ??


The solution to using 901's in a multichannel rig works best when you have individual Front Right and Left Pre-Outs but this receiver doesn't have them so a compromise is in order.

First some background.


The use of 901's Active EQ (or any external processor) in any digital AV receiver setup for anything EXCEPT STEREO listening through the 901's alone requires you to have a separate amplifier for them and to avoid having to use a Tape Monitor which could introduce proprietary and potentially damaging Active Equalization back into anything in the AV Receiver with its conventional speakers.


In an AVR, if you activate any Tape Monitor circuit at all, you will kill any digital sources. That is a function of AV receivers in general, nothing to do with 901's. Your Pre-Outs get us around that possibility and limitation but it also means you need a moderately powerful amp for your 901's.

http://www.retrevo.com/support/Pioneer-VSX-520-K-Receivers-manual/id/23653ag911/t/2/

This works for all models of AV receivers when you want 901's as Front L&R speakers...


Get yourself a nice separate amp, draw the Front L&R pre-out signals from wherever you can find them, in your case maybe the CDR or DVR/VCR outputs.


On many AVR's, there is a pre-amp out for every channel in case you want to run external amps for any channels. That is how my old Pioneer VSX-36TX is equipped. For others (yours), you have to borrow the signals from a typical CDR or DVR/VCR Output RCA pair. Just remember, AV receivers disable digital inputs as soon as you switch in a Tape Monitor, so choose one you won

Feb 13, 2011 | Pioneer Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I have bose 901 with a rotel receiver im still not getting the sound i want will a power amp help get that surrond sound im looking for


The use of 901's in any digital AV receiver setup for anything EXCEPT STEREO listening through the 901's alone requires you to have a separate amplifier for them and to avoid having to use a Tape Monitor.

That is because if you activate any Tape Monitor circuit at all, you will kill any digital sources. That is a function of AV receivers in general, nothing to do with 901's. However, you can still draw the Front Left and Right signals out of any Pre-Out (with a Y-cable set, looping the Pre Out directly back to the Main In) or Tape Out jacks (remembering to NEVER activate that monitor on the receiver), go into the Active EQ's Amplifier Connections; then Out of the EQ's Amplifier Connection to a separate amp and attach the 901's to that amp. This way you won't introduce proprietary and potentially damaging Active Equalization back into anything in the AV Receiver with its conventional speakers.

Get yourself a nice separate amp, draw the Front L&R pre-out signals from wherever you can find them. On many, there is a pre-amp out for every channel in case you want to run external amps for any channels. That is how my old Pioneer VSX-36TX is equipped. For others, you may have to borrow the signals from a typical Tape- or Adapter-Out RCA pair. Just remember, AV receivers disable digital inputs as soon as you switch in a Tape Monitor, so choose one you won't have to switch IN. The signal Out is always there regardless of the monitor state.

The AV Receiver can still drive the Center, Surrounds and the Sub(s) as it is designed. This is how mine is wired.

Come to think of it, you could still have conventional Front L&R speakers on the AV Receiver, but why? Maybe one would prefer the 901's for music and some other speakers for surround. Level matching with the 901's to conventional front speakers would only be possible if the separate amp has its own volume, but it would work. Maybe I'll try it someday. None of my current amps has a volume control.

Nov 29, 2009 | Bose 901 VI Main / Stereo Speaker

1 Answer

Which home theater recivers are compatiable with the 901 equalizer and speakers?


The use of 901's in any digital AV receiver setup for anything EXCEPT STEREO listening through the 901's alone requires you to have a separate amplifier for them and to avoid having to use a Tape Monitor.

That is because if you activate any Tape Monitor circuit at all, you will kill any digital sources. That is a function of AV receivers in general, nothing to do with 901's. However, you can still draw the Front Left and Right signals out of any Pre-Out (with a Y-cable set, looping the Pre Out directly back to the Main In) or Tape Out jacks (remembering to NEVER activate that monitor on the receiver), go into the Active EQ's Amplifier Connections; then Out of the EQ's Amplifier Connection to a separate amp and attach the 901's to that amp. This way you won't introduce proprietary and potentially damaging Active Equalization back into anything in the AV Receiver with its conventional speakers.

Get yourself a nice separate amp, draw the Front L&R pre-out signals from wherever you can find them. On many, there is a pre-amp out for every channel in case you want to run external amps for any channels. That is how my old Pioneer VSX-36TX is equipped. For others, you may have to borrow the signals from a typical Tape- or Adapter-Out RCA pair. Just remember, AV receivers disable digital inputs as soon as you switch in a Tape Monitor, so choose one you won't have to switch IN. The signal Out is always there regardless of the monitor state.

The AV Receiver can still drive the Center, Surrounds and the Sub(s) as it is designed. This is how mine is wired.

Come to think of it, you could still have conventional Front L&R speakers on the AV Receiver, but why? Maybe one would prefer the 901's for music and some other speakers for surround. Level matching with the 901's to conventional front speakers would only be possible if the separate amp has its own volume, but it would work. Maybe I'll try it someday. None of my current amps has a volume control.

Nov 21, 2009 | Bose 901 VI Main / Stereo Speaker

1 Answer

Bose 901 Hook up help !


The use of 901's in any digital AV receiver setup for anything EXCEPT STEREO listening through the 901's alone requires you to have a separate amplifier for them and to avoid having to use a Tape Monitor.

That is because if you activate any Tape Monitor circuit at all, you will kill any digital sources. That is a function of AV receivers in general, nothing to do with 901's. However, you can still draw the Front Left and Right signals out of any Pre-Out (with a Y-cable set, looping the Pre Out directly back to the Main In) or Tape Out jacks (remembering to NEVER activate that monitor on the receiver), go into the Active EQ's Amplifier Connections; then Out of the EQ's Amplifier Connection to a separate amp and attach the 901's to that amp. This way you won't introduce proprietary and potentially damaging Active Equalization back into anything in the AV Receiver with its conventional speakers.

Get yourself a nice separate amp, draw the Front L&R pre-out signals from wherever you can find them. On many, there is a pre-amp out for every channel in case you want to run external amps for any channels. That is how my old Pioneer VSX-36TX is equipped. For others, you may have to borrow the signals from a typical Tape- or Adapter-Out RCA pair. Just remember, AV receivers disable digital inputs as soon as you switch in a Tape Monitor, so choose one you won't have to switch IN. The signal Out is always there regardless of the monitor state.

The AV Receiver can still drive the Center, Surrounds and the Sub(s) as it is designed. This is how mine is wired.

Come to think of it, you could still have conventional Front L&R speakers on the AV Receiver, but why? Maybe one would prefer the 901's for music and some other speakers for surround. Level matching with the 901's to conventional front speakers would only be possible if the separate amp has its own volume, but it would work. Maybe I'll try it someday. None of my current amps has a volume control.

Get yourself a nice separate amp, draw the Front L&R pre-out signals from wherever you can find them. On many, there is a pre-amp out for every channel in case you want to run external amps for any channels. That is how my old Pioneer VSX-36TX is equipped. For others, you may have to borrow the signals from a typical Tape- or Adapter-Out RCA pair. Just remember, AV receivers disable digital inputs as soon as you switch in a Tape Monitor, so choose one you won't have to switch IN. The signal Out is always there regardless of the monitor state.

The AV Receiver can still drive the Center, Surrounds and the Sub(s) as it is designed. This is how mine is wired.

Come to think of it, you could still have conventional Front L&R speakers on the AV Receiver, but why? Maybe one would prefer the 901's for music and some other speakers for surround. Level matching with the 901's to conventional front speakers would only be possible if the separate amp has its own volume, but it would work. Maybe I'll try it someday. None of my current amps has a volume control.

Oct 22, 2009 | Bose 901 VI Main / Stereo Speaker

4 Answers

Bose 901's with Onkyo A9755B


Did you buy the 901's new along with the eq? If you did then I wouldn't suspect it to be the eq. If you bought it used, it sounds like the eq. I have had two of them go bad. Are you cutting the bass up on the Onkyo? Do you have the speakers placed correctly, like 18" from the wall? These speakers don't have a lot of bass unless they are placed correctly against a wall. They really sound best in a corner. You should get a difference when you move the opts on the eq though. Hope this helps some

Jul 13, 2009 | Bose 901 VI Main / Stereo Speaker

2 Answers

How to connect old 901 Bose equilizer to amp/receiver


If you plan to use them with a home theater, you will need a seperate amplifier, as most a/v receivers don't have tape monitors. With an integrated amp hook rec out to the input on eq hook output on eq to playback on tape mon. with seperates hook pre amp out to input on eq, output on eq to power amp input.

Jun 23, 2009 | Bose 901 VI Main / Stereo Speaker

3 Answers

How do I connect my Bose 901 to my Pioneer VSX-515. I have used the eq to the tape in tape out as instructions tell me to do, but do not have a "tape monitor" button on my receiver. I get sound from the...


I'm not sure that receiver is compatible with outboard EQs like the 901 EQ. This receiver is also not on Bose's 901 EQ compatibility chart, so it's possible that this is not going to work at all. You could call Pioneer and ask if this receiver is compatible with ANY outboard gear (such as EQs, compressors etc) but I don't think it is.. The tape in/ tape out I think is only for 1 source.. That's the problem with new receivers, they expect that nobody will want to connect any external gear (like back in the day) because everything is built in.

Jun 11, 2009 | Onkyo TX-SR705 Receiver

1 Answer

Pioneer SX-950


use a cable tester for the wires that are connecting to the unit and you'll find the faulty wire that is bad.....good luck

Nov 03, 2008 | Pioneer AVIC-S1 GPS Receiver

1 Answer

SX-1600 + KD-491F


Hi again,

It would seem that you posted the problem here also. With your kind permission, I will repost my excerpts of my responses that others may benefit on similar concerns.

A. Most current receivers no longer include a PHONO input. Perhaps what could be done is to purchase a phono to line level pre-amplifier to go along in your purchase for a new receiver.

I was made to understand that the Pioneer SX-1600 is prone to speaker output problems which could either be:
1. the speaker relay (protection); and/or
2. the amp, STK4191II Stereo Module.

Either should be relatively easy to work on and perhaps you can try the services of a locally available qualified electronic technician since the repairs would not be too specialized. The service manual may be of help (or at least a schematic , they may be downloaded from here and here).

B. To recap what you need is a receiver that can accommodate:
4 - Pioneer S-DF1-K (15-100W, 8 ohms)
1 - Pioneer PD-F407 25 Disc CD Player
1 - Pioneer CT-300 dual tape deck
1 - Kenwood KD-491F turntable

C. Possible choices are (keeping in mind that the power output should be less if not equal to 100 watts and a turntable/phono input):
i. Onkyo TX-8522 Stereo Receiver;
ii. Yamaha RX-397 100 Watt Natural Sound AM/FM Stereo Receiver;
iii. Sony STR DE695 AV receiver;
iv. Teac AG-790 200 Watt Stereo Receiver;
v. Denon AVR 888 - AV receiver - 7.1 channel.

Some of the above also includes feature(s) to hook up to your video system. Some may even require a fifth speaker (subwoofer).

Incidentally, you can also choose another brand/model even without a turntable/phono input. As initially posted, a turntable/phone to line level pre-amplifier is only required. Here are some examples:
a. XP200 Turntable Preamp - Nano Series;
b. Pyle® Pro PP999 Phono Preamplifier;
c. Pro-Ject Phono Box Turntable Preamplifier;
d. Radial J33 RIAA Turntable Preamp Direct Box

Good luck with your project.

Apr 29, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

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